Skip to main content

Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (July-Dec. 1910)"

See other formats


D 20Q? 1202237 1 

California State Library 



'TA 

URY 



Accession No — Li IX 

Call Jfo.y "- 




AM 






i 



"GOOD TIMES TALK" IS GOOD TALK. GET THAT HABIT. 



Established July 20. 1856 







10 Cents 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, JULY 2 1910 



(* 



$4 Pir Yiir 



Ia Marquise 

Turkish Cigarettes 




(< 



OF A VINTAGE 

10 for 25 Cents 



» 



Ever Seen 
California's 
Holland? 

TAKE 

Southern Pacific's 

NETHERLANDS 
ROUTE 

The Daylight service between 
San Francisco and Sacramento 
via the new steamer "NAVAJO" 

Leave San Francisco 8:00 A. M. 
Arrive Sacramento 6:00 P. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

A DELIGHTFUL SCENIC 
WATER TRIP 

for tourists and auto parties. 

Meals — Beautiful Staterooms and Parlors 



HOTELS AND SUMMER RESORTS 



ASK AGENTS 



Pacific Street Wharf, Market Street Ferry,;Depot, 

Flood Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Bring the children and the fireworks for 
a Jolly Fourth of July at 

Hotel Del Monte 

GRAND FIREWORKS DISPLAY ON GROUNDS 
IN FRONT OF HOTEL 

Public and private fireworks displays 
permitted on Del Monte Beach and 
"Lover's Point'' in Pacific Grove 



For rates, reservations, etc., address 

H. R WARNER, Manager 
Chester W. Kelly. Cily Representative 406 Crocker Bide., S. F. Kearny 4013 




ALL ROADS LEAD TO 

Marchand's 

HAYWARDS 



For years located in San 
Francisco, and for 8 years 
at Geary and Stockton, is 
now located in Haywards. 
The same dinners, the same 
service as of old. A cele- 
brated chef has been se- 
cured. Garage attached. 
GasoMnt and oils con- 
stantly on hand. Auto fo r 
hire. 

EDDIE MARCHAND 

Manager 



HOTEL POTTER 

Offers a greater variety of recreation 
and comfort than any hotel in the world. 
Maintaining a standard in cuisine and 
service by which others are judged. 

Potter Hotel Company 

SANTA BARBARA 



Make LAKE COUNTY 



BY THE 

Scenic Route 



The most comfortable way to make Lake County is by Win. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery; easy 
carriages; careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, An- 
derson and Mira Vista, $7; to Adams, Seiglers; Bonanza, Hobergs, 
Howard, Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook, S9. Stages leave Calistoga 
11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at Calistoga. 
Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished when desired. 
Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific office. 



HOTEL LYNDON 



1 hour and 30 minutes over Bay 
Shore and Mayfield Cut-Off. 



LOS GATOS, 



Cal. 








PARAISO HOT SPRINGS 

CALIFORNIA'S FAMOUS HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT 



The Paradise of Automobilists. New 
Boulevard from Soledad to the Springs. 
All roads from Oakland south are now 
in elegant shape for motoring. The 
new road around San Juan Grade is 
now open to the public Special atten- 
tion given to Week End Auto Parties. 
The natural stopping place for autoists 
enroute from San Francisco to Los 
Angeles. Swimmingtank, plunges and 
baths, the finest in the West. Waters 
awarded first prize at St. Louis Exposi- 
tion. Expert masseurs. New reduced 
round trip rates $6.35 including auto. 



H. H. McGOWAN, Paraiso, Monterey County, Cal. 




The favorite resort for tourists, sight-seers, health and pleasure 
seekers. A greater variety of mineral waters than any one place 
In the world. The only natural mineral steam and Hammam bath 
having great curative qualities. Wi cure rheuma- 

tism and stomach trouble. All kinds of amusements, including 
dancing every evening. Table unexcelled. Climate perfect and 
scenery finest in the world. Good bunting and fishing. Rates $:> 
per day and $12 to Jlf per week. A new auto and stage re 
been built from Hoaldsburg to the G on and after May 

16th there will be an auto run In connection with the regular 
stage. C. C. Foss. the celebrated Stage driver, will handle the 
stage between llealdsburg and the Geysers For further par 
ticulars address R. IT. CURRY. Proprietor. THE GEYSERS. CAL 



Santa Cruz, Cal. 

The Santa Cruz Beach Company beg to announce 
that the Grill and Cottage City at the Beach will be 
open for the season on May 16th, 19 lO. Grand 
Opening Dinner. Saturday Evening, June 18th, 1910. 

Automobilists will find accommodations 

Santa Cruz Beach Company 




THE QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

W.H.MARSHALL, Proprietor. Open' the year around. Posi- 
tively the finest swimming 1 tank, mineral springs and plunges in 
this secTtion of the State. Table unexcelled. New and dtridUy 
flrsVclass management. LAKE COUNTY, CALIF. 



HARBIN SPRINGS 

The Resort of Lake County 

Unexcelled waters for rheumatism, gout, dropsy and 
all skin diseases. Round trip to springs at S.P. office, 
$7. For rates and booklet write MRS. J. A. HAYS, 
Harbin Springs, Lake Co., Calif. 



Anderson Springs 



LAKE COUNTY. 
CALIFORNIA 



The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths In t-akf County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Uoard — $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs — Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m.. or S, P. train to Calls toga, arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Tare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all 
communications to J. ANDERSON. Anderson Springs, Middletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE Be*l rouic (or «ul« u vi* rteaner lo Vallfjo. ihmce throufS Ntpa. Citilofi and 
Middktown 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San Pi Cities; 

ra* lido; NO STAGING; swimming tank, tub, plunge and 
el.-, trie light baths; cure stomach troubles, rheumatism, liver and 
kldnev complaints, every accommodation; reasonable rates. Take 
N w tl Sausallto Ferry at 7 15 a in. and 4:45 p. m.; 

fare $1 65 round trip. Inquire at 789 Market and 2004 Sutter, or 
RICHARDS, Agua Caliente. Sonoma County. 



CLOVERDALE STABLES 

Plneffl ric^ in Sonoma County. Headquarters for Geyser Stage 
tg and Fishing parties furnished with horses, buggies 

H I. BARKER. Prop. 







r* r^r »v 



i?esl,-solid-. 
" ivome-lika/ 
comlSr~tJ , ., 
allmoderjN 
Ldfelluxuriec 
beaoitiful, 

«Surroundin^<; 
reskSoarvaLlex 
diaries isAe 
cambina>£icfi\ 
wv^ll X/irvxi 



YOSEMITE 

Camp Lost Arrow c^Lmta 

Largest Hotel-Camp on the CoaSt. Grounds and 
buildings electric lighted. Now open for the season. 

O a* 1 ll/vfrvl The only Hotel in Yosemite. 
OCnlinei nOlCI The "Hub" of the Valley. 
Steam heated. Electric lighted. Open the year 
around. Glacier Point Hotel and Camp under 
same management. For rates or other information 

Address J. B. COOK, Prop., Yosemite, Cal. 

Or Southern Pacific Agents, Santa Fe Agents, 

Peck-Judah Information Bureau 



Castle Crags Farm 



A delightful place to spend the sum- 
mer among the pines near Mt. Shasta. 
Reopened June 1st under manage- 
ment of 



MRS. W. T. MORRIS 
Care Hotel Victoria San Francisco 



Skaggs Hot Springs 

AWARDED FIRST PRIZE 1909. 
Nine miles from Geyserville, Sonoma County. Two trains daily 
— fare $4.60 round trip, including stage. Natural hot mineral 
water at a temperaure of 135 degrees, cures Rheumatism, Kidney, 
Liver and Stomach troubles. Baths free to guests. Swimming, 
Hunting, Fishing, Livery, Tennis, etc. Fine orchestra. Table un- 
excelled. Rates $12 to $16 per week. Write for booklet and reser- 
vations to PETER J. CURTIS. Skaggs, Sonoma Co., Cal., or Peck- 
Judah Co., 789 Market street. 



Napa Soda Springs 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. 
L. Hlrsch and M. C. Dillon, Proprietors. 
Automobile service to springs meets three trains daily. Special 
round-trip fare from S. F. via Monticello Steamship Co., $3, in- 
cluding auto service to springs. A beautiful mountain, health and 
pleasure resort; newly renovated; hot and cold soda baths; new 
electric light service; bowling; livery and auto service; saddle don- 
keys for children. Write for booklet to L. HIRSCH, Napa Soda 
Springs, Cal. For folder and further particulars, inquire at Peck- 
Judah Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San Francisco. 



HOTEL WiNDQ MEL^ggguflL 

SERVICE AND ENVIRONMENT MAKE THIS AN IDEAL HOTEL F0RM0T0RISTS 
AND WEEKEND PARTIES. 




HW.MKC. 




TAVERN 

OF 

TAMALPAIS 

SUMMIT OF 
Mt. Tamalpais California 

STAY OVER NIGHT AND SEE THE SUNRISE 

APPOINTMENTS. SERVICE and CUISINE UNSURPASSED 

Address: "TAVERN OF TAMALPAIS." TAMALPAIS 

Telephone Mill Valley 83 



Seigler Hot Springs 

Best Location In Lake County. 

Natural hot baths for rheumatism, malaria, etc.; wonderful stom- 
ach waters; Greatest Arsenic Beauty Bath In the State; swimming 
pond. Baths free. Rates. $10 to $14. Livery in connection. Infor- 
mation at Peck-Judah's, 7S9 Market street, or address W. E. 
CATHIE. Seigler, Lake County, Cal. 



Mountain Home 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains; no better place in Central California 
for hunting, fishing, swimming; table unsurpassed; delightful cli- 
mate; stage at Madrone, Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. Long 
distance telephone. Train leaves city at 9 a. m. Send for souvenir 
of Mrs. Vic. Poncelet. Llagas, Cal. Delightful trip for automobll- 
Ists. Information at Letcher's Garage, San Jose. 



CAMP AHWAHNEE, Yosemite 

At the foot of Glacier Point Trail. Opposite Yosemite Falls. 
Every tent electric lighted. The most luxurious camp 

in the Valley. 

W. M. SELL, Jr., Manager 



Gilroy Hot Springs 



n«. M . * 1200 t0 S17.50 per week 
Kates ' $2.00 to $2.50 per day 



12 miles of elegant Automo- 
bile Roads from Gilroy to the 
Springs. Finest mineral waters and climate in the State. 
THE Place to Spend the WEEK END 

m. j. Mcdonald, 

Proprietor 




E»UMIiti«d July JO. ISM 



FRANCJ8 Co 

TER 

Devoted to the Leading Intereete of California and the Pacific Coaat. 





VOL. LXXX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 2, 1910 



Ni. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhlll, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication In 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

Over the hills to the prize-fight to-day, and over the hills 

hi the poorhouse by and bye. 

Colonel Roosevelt says he is going to be an oyster for two 

months — and those two months have no "R" in them. 

Yale has conferred a doctor's degree on James J. Hill. 

If you have a sick railroad, do not fail to send for "Old Doc." 
Hill. 

The arm of the law is surely long enough in Stockton, 

for it is attached to the person of a policeman six feet nine inches 
tall. 

In Missouri the meat trust is up against the law. The 

"show me" attorney general asks that the demonstration be made 
in court. 

Bryan told the missionary convention in London that war 

ought to be made impossible — in fad. it should be thoroughly 
Bryanized. 

And now the lady stars occupying the azure field will 

kindly move over and make room for Sister Arizona and Sister 
New Mexico. 

The eye of .lack London, empurpled by the list of Mul- 

downey, is eminently suited to the business of watching .1 pri e- 

fight for pay. 

New York bouts arc to charge guests extra for the use of 

napkins, tableware, etc. Menu cards, however, «ill still be sup- 
plied free of cost. 

Meeklj the News Letter pises to suggest thai perhaps the 

best way to keep microbes off the carstraps would be to compel 
the passengers to wash their has 

"Rockwell" is the name used i.v Teddy junior to keep him 

incog during his honeymoon. It has a certain cradle sugg 
ness that oughl tn appeal to father. 

The state University is looking for a peach thai will with- 
stand frost. Up annuel Mason ami Kllis there flourishes a variety 
that couldn't be feazed bj an iceberg. 

An authentic ease of hook-worm is reported from Phila- 
delphia, Aba. at last we begin to understand what has ailed the 
city of yawns and caps all these years I 

The biggest booked tisb of the season dragged down to the 

depths and drowned the small buy at the other end of the line. 
And this from Bober-minded Massachusetts! 

The United Brethren of California want the divorce laws 

of the State made more strict. Is that the only way the United 

Brethren can keep the United Sistern from seeking 

mat 



And there were some who thought thai a Governor could 

not really govern! 

It took two columns to adjourn Congress and two pages 

to describe a day's doings on the part of a pair of prize-fighters 
at Reno. Great is the art of modern journalism! 

Banker Drexcl's son went up more (ban a thousand feet in 

an aeroplane. He's a real highflier, but be doesn't do it in the 
manner most affected by the sons of multi-millionaires. 

"The walking is fine" — so reports the "shoe leather bri- 
gade" sent out to gather in the comparatively little money needed 
to bring the world's fair fund up to the $7,500,000 mark. 

Everything comes high over at Reno — the altitude, rooms, 

meals, divorces and re-marriages — except the moral tone of the 
community, which grows steadily lower and more cheerful. 

A professor at the University of Chicago predicts that 

pretty soon there will be no red tape in the administration of the 
law. When that time comes, what, pray, will the lawyers do? 

The State Entomologist is back from the Orient with a 

fresh lot of lady-bugs to devour orchard pests. The imported 
lady-bug has an appetite like that of the domestic "lady friend." 

Oxford's merry students bad not a word of the traditional 

"chaff" when that ancient institution gave Roosevelt his D. C. I.. 
Possibly tbev were doI sure thai be bad left bis elephant gun at 
the hotel. 

New York surgeons have outfitted a Connecticut man with 

an artificial jaw of solid gold. He oughl t" !»■ the righl person 
to turn I",,-,' against the next sixteen-to-one orator thai invade* 
his home town. 

A Watsonville woman has taken OUl a license permitting 

her in Imnt deer. The age of her i- fifty-seven, which may 1 
why she does qoI ind await a hunter with a differ- 
ent kind nf a license. 
Germany's official censor nf play- has come to the United 

Slates very ill. and seeking a long rest. Fur bis benefit, WO 

might revivi ent favorites like the unmodified version of 

'"] m i;irl from Rector's." 

The kind of San Franciscan who can't afford to buy a 

share of World's Fair >tock. but can spend no! less than - 
-o to the fight, might just a- well omit to buy a return ticket. 
the Has; wants him: we don't. 

The "Zeppelin Limited." carrying a score of 

360 miles in nine hours and serving them luncheon as they Hew 

1 nli. was the first commercial eonni 
the air. While America and France aviate for sport. Germany 
: ter the money. 

Times are so bitterly hard in the United States that the 

promoters of the Reno fight cannot figure on more than a quar- 
ter of a million dollars for tick a big white man and 
a big black man pummel each other for a few minutes or an hour 
or so on the Fourth. 



E ID) D T © 1 D A L 



EIMT 



That San Francisco business man 
Good Times Talk. who talks hard times or even listens 

patiently to pessimistic conversation, 
is doing himself and the community needless injury. Mercifully, 
there are not many such. We be a courageous folk, take us by 
and large, and resourceful in such measure that we astonish not 
only the outer world but ourselves. 

Just look at the larger facts of our recent achievement : in four 
years we have written off a calamity loss of $500,000,000 ; have 
rebuilt the city; have brought back or replaced about 250,000 of 
lost population; have held the largest and most enjoyable popular 
celebration in the records of the West ; have cleaned up our Gov- 
ernment ; have subscribed more than $G,000,000 on I of hand for 
a world's fair. 

Then consider what is about to happen : we shall soon have in 
actual operation a new transcontinental railroad; we shall shortly 
break ground for the greatest international exposition this side 
of Chicago; >ve are at the point of beginning the expenditure of 
many millions of dollars upon the municipal water project, which 
will give us a supply of the prime necessary of community living 
surpassing in quality, quantity and price that of any other Ameri- 
can city; the Panama Canal, moving rapidly and steadily to com- 
pletion, will soon be bringing us new population by the steamer- 
load to settle our broad acres and make them productive of the 
foodstuffs for which the markets of the world clamor ; the prom- 
ise of Oriental trade is so sure that the Pacific Mail is to build at 
once two huge, fast, modern ocean liners that will ply out of the 
Golden Gate. 

The man who can reflect upon these things done and these 
things immediately in prospect, must have been born a pessimist 
and does not belong here. 

Possibly one of the most cheerful signs of the times and most 
encouraging is the response so promptly made by the big public 
service corporations to the call for world's fair funds. Up steps 
the Southern Pacific with a quarter of a million to lay down be- 
side equal sums from the Royal Arch and the hotelmen. Comes 
the United Eailroads with $150,000, the S. P. Gas Company with 
$100,000, the Santa Fe with $125,000, and Standard Oil with 
$50,000. You can hear the jingle of the Western Pacific just 
outside the door with another thumping subscription. If these 
subscriptions do not testify to a far-sighted, long-headed faith 
in the future of San Francisco, then they mean nothing. And 
they show, too, the right kind of public spirit. They cannot 
fail to lay a hush upon the chorus of those who have so long 
lifted up their voices in criticism of the public service corpora- 
tions of San Francisco. 

Already we have hotels and apartment houses far beyond the 
capacity of the days of smiling prosperity that shone upon us just 
before the fire of 1906. And yet new buildings of this class are 
going up by the score, and other scores are beginning or are an- 
nounced. It is "wise money" that is putting up these structures. 
It knows what it is doing. With painstaking care it has fore- 
casted the early future and is preparing for it. The result of the 
census enumeration will unquestionably show that the city is 
back to where it was before the calamity in point of population. 
The capitalists and realty investors of San Francisco are not 
gamblers. They are essentially and conspicuously cautious and 
conservative. And they are betting their hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars on a great and immediate increase in the de- 
mand for house room here, which means a great and immediate 
influx of population, a huge and healthy prosperity in all lines of 
business. 

The News Letter has been here a long time and has witnessed 
many marvels. It, too, looks forward to better times than it 
has seen before. Harriman, observing men and cities from his 
financial eerie, foresaw the coming of great and greater things 



for San Francisco. He was busy getting the Southern Pacific 
ready for them when his hand was stilled. He had built the 
bay shore cut-off and planned a terminal adequate to the condi- 
tions as he saw and foresaw them. 

These things are coming to pass even sooner than his master 
mind divined. They are almost here. The optimist of to-day 
will be the profit-taker of to-morrow. It is no place or time for 
the pessimist. All's well with San Francisco, and all's going to 
be incalculably better. 



The End of the 
Prize-Fight Game. 



"It is the last 'big light" this country 
will ever see" — so say the wise 
patrons of the sport that is no spoil, 
the astute observers of the ignoble 
game. Devoutly let us hope that it "will turn out thai qray, ae 
most probably it will. Certainly the auriferous goose is dead, 
as far as California is concerned. Nevada mai tolerate the 
ringsters for awhile. Montana may beckon them. Arizona and 
New Mexico, just coming into the long-delayed maturity of 
statehood, will hardly want them. Thus civilization marches 
across the map. The burly bruiser and the cunning, crooked pro- 
moter go to join the "bad man" of the border in the rearward 
files of time. They are history, unpleasant facts in the record of 
the progress of a race. 

In truth, it was not the brutality of prize-fighting that proxi- 
mately caused its elimination from the present-day scheme of 
things, for, in fact, it was not physically brutal. Morally it was 
degraded and degrading, a glorification of the merely animal, 
but the blows struck- in the resined arena seldom hurt anybody 
very much. Football, even in its mollycoddled form, is a great 
deal more hazardous to the participants. More men have died 
from mishaps on the football field than ever found their way to 
the graveyard through the prize-ring. The real banefulness of 
it was more for those who looked on than for those who took 
part. For all of that, the game might have gone on a con- 
siderable way had it not been for the rapacious commercialism of 
it. The world might have endured the fighter, but it finally 
refused to stand for his manager or for the promoter, art 
ambo. It was they that hastened the course of evolution and 
progress. 

In the latter days of the game, it had become so corrupt that 
it was little more than a highly profitable sort of circus, a 
distinguished from other amusement enterprises by the baseness 
of its appeal and by its huge profits. It was more often than 
not sheer fraud from its inception to its finish, palpably arranged 
and "fixed," and frequently carried out to its prc-detennin.il 
conclusion with such clumsiness that not even the most gullible 
ticket-buyer or bettor could fail to see the sham of it. "If it's 
on the square"' was the common reservation of those who ven- 
tured to forecast the outcome of any of the "big fight.-." 

As with horse-racing, so it was with prize- fighting. Theii 
was hastened by internal disorders, the consequence of greed for 
illegitimate gain. It was not enough for the promoters that 
they should profit enormously by direct and open means. They 
must needs know in advance the result of a contest of skill and 
strength whose uncertainty was the essence of the game to the 
spectator and the outsider, and thereby doubly mulct the unin- 
formed. They achieved by experience a truly remarkable cum 
in such arrangements, but the actors in the shows, the fighters, 
were not always so adroit, and sometimes they did not keep faith. 
Slowly enough that patient ass, the public, discovered the actual 
inwardness of the thing, and then, when civilization bade the 
fighter and promoter and manager get on the shelf with the 
world's discarded things, the "fight fan" did not particularly 
care and offered no opposition. "It was crooked anyhow," he 
said. So passed prize-fighting. Let us give thanks, 






July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



It is bad enough to have to pay out 
A Farceto Be Eni>ki>. $11,200 Annually Eoi really unneces- 
sary bondsmen, but worse I" be eon 
liimallv denied a trial on a charge trumped up by business rivals, 
and it is with relief that a very tired public at last sees the Su- 
preme Court called upon to act in the eases of Thornwell Mul- 
lally, Tirey L. Ford and \V. M. Abbott, who for three years have 
been striving to bring to trial the indictments that were brought 
against them at the behest of a privately controlled prosecution. 

The provision for habeas corpus proceedings is one of the most 
vital ones in our national and State Constitutions. It was incor- 
porated in them for just such affairs as this. It is the only rem- 
edy for citizens charged with offenses of which they can never 
be proved guilty, to preserve their rights. Month after month, 
Messrs. Mullally, Ford and Abbott have besought a judge, openly 
charged with bias, to grant them the speedy trial guaranteed 
I hem by law, but that judge has persisted in his malign refusal 
to try them. They have followed the only channel of relief, and 
it is to be expected that the Supreme Court will soon act. There 
is nothing in the contention that their surrender to the Sheriff 
constituted a voluntary restraint of the defendant's liberty. They 
have been in constructive custody all along. In fact, a man re- 
leased on bail is not at liberty. His confinement is relaxed, that 
is all, for he is still under the restraint of the court. Happily, 
there are indications that the farce of Judge Lawlor's court will 
soon be ended, as it should have been long ago. 

»• 
The vital facts as to the cost of liv- 
Bepoet on High ing were hardly to have been ex- 

Cost of Living. pected from Senator Lodge's com- 

mittee. Naturally enough, the poli- 
ticians who conducted the inquiry and reported its results cov- 
ered up or ignored such facts as might reflect upon and work in- 
jury to themselves and their great and good friends. Senator 
Lodge is the elder brother of the trusts, and, hence, uncle on 
the paternal side to the protective tariff. How could he be ex- 
pected to lay a finger upon either the trusts or the tariff as causes 
contributing largely and powerfully to the ills that make the 
American people sweat and groan and toil lest, they starve? 

Nor was it to have been expected of Senator Lodge and his 
associates that they would turn up the cold truth about the part 
that labor unionism plays in the comedy- or is it tragedy? — of 
present-day living. They are politicians all, ami politicians dare 
not tell the truth about organized labor — no! aloud. Lake the 
commercialized press, the politicians are afraid of or: 
labor. They traffic with it and use it, all the while baring and 
fearing it. \ en bey are responsible for its strength, it 

not for ils existence. They and their masters, in blind and care- 
leas greed and selfishness, have fostered a like greed and 
ness in the strata below them, BO! lealing with it and en- 

couraging it to suit their own ends, and sometimes strengthening 
it by oppression. Now it is big and so strong that they dare not 
ill it l.\ in right name — dare not intimate that of all trusts 
the labor trust is the moel i;reedv, brutal and feckless. 

Most people in this country are neither rich nor poor, hfos 
of them have their being in between organized capital on 
hand and organized labor on the other. Most of them work hard. 
and, under normal conditions, get a fair living in return for their 
toil. Just now they, the vast middle class, suffer with growing 
BCUtenesa from a twofold pressure. Organized capital, operat- 
ing for the trusts through the tariff and through coinbin.it 
restraint of trade, makes <]ieir living dearer and harder. Organ- 
ized labor, more and more effectually controlling the opportunity 
to work, demands and gets the larger part of the toiler- 
of production. It is the man between the two organized forces 
that inevitably suffers. 

For the most part, Senator Lodge's brothers, the trusts, made 



the tariff'. They built it so that practically all the American 
people eai ami wear must pa] tribute to them, and hence must 
cost the consumer more. Other countries neighbor to us have in 
abundance and cheapness what we need. The tariff prohibits 
them from selling it. to us. Notice that as prices rise in the 
United Stales the cost of Government increases, and the tariff 
that bears the major part of that expense must also grow. Sena- 
tor Lodge and his friends determine the cost of Government, and 
they also make the tariff. There seems to be not very much 
chance of escape for the public. It will hardly be satisfied with 
the vague declaration of Lodge and his associates that the cost of 
living is high because the people want more than there is — that 
they seek to live too well. 

se- 
lf is barely possible that the Judges 
Court Decisions in San Francisco city and county 

in Labor Cases. may some day decide that they really 

have a backbone, and that the back- 
bone is a part of their physical make-up given them to carry out 
the mental process by which they arrive at decisions. 

It is possible that the reading of a decision given in the East, 
regarding picketing, may put a trifle of bravado into the men on 
the bench in California, when dealing with labor cases. 

It appears to be next to impossible to get a case against a 
labor unionite before the courts in this city and county. 

This is a Chicago case. The plaintiff, Schnell, was a member 
of the Wood Workers' union. He had been appointed a picket. 
He was engaged in the laudable occupation of boycotting, by 
picketing, a free-born American citizen when he was arrested. 
The specific charge in the complaint was that Schnell had made 
"a diversion tending to a breach of the peace." Upon the trial 
in the police court, Schnell was discharged. He then brought 
a suit for damages. The ground was malicious prosecution. Here 
is the decision of Judge Chetlain before whom the case was tried : 

"Chetlain, J. — Gentlemen of the Jury, the court has reached 
the conclusion, and is constrained to hold here that the plaintiff 
cannot maintain his action. The law in this State, as laid down 
by the Supreme Court in Barnes vs. Chicago Typographical 
Union, 2:52 III.. 4'.' I. is ibis: That peaceful picketing in itself 
is unlawful; thai one engaged in peaceful picketing is doing that 
which tends to a breach of the peace, which tends to annoy his 
employer, and is an act that is calculated to intimidate, and for 
that, iv mlawful. I have never s.> held before, but in- 

asmuch as the law is plainly laid down in the 232d Illinois, tin 
court is constrained In follow it. I will therefore direct a verdict 
of not guilty." 



Still another illustration of the urgent need for laws re- 
quiring rear lights on vehicles of all kinds was furnished in Xan 
Leandro last Saturday night, when an automobile, apparently 
with a (dear road ahead of it. came suddenly, and too late to stop, 
upon a wagon containing nine persons, among them three small 
children. In the inevitable collision that ensued, the people 
in the wagon were badly shaken up, and the children were more 
or less badly hurt, as was one of the older persons in the wagon. 
Such accidents are occurring all the time all over the State, and 
for each actual accident there are scores of narrow escapes. It is 
the simplest thing in the world to place a rear light upon any 
vehicle, and it is certainly not expensive. A law making it com- 
pulsory should be enacted at once by all county boards of super- 
visors, if not by the State Legislature. 

A noted prizefighter, employed, temporarily, as a special 

correspondent by a local paper, writes : "Suppose I should stop 
to answer all the slanders which have been published about me, 
what time should I have for any respectable employment '"" 1 
cannot conceive what disposition this person could make of time 
for any respectable employment ; it would surely hang very heav* 
ily on his hands. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



For fierceness and whirlwind activ- 
Ti-ie Political Outlook, ity the Congressional campaign of 
1910 is likely to be a memorable 
event in the history of American politics, and as it progresses, 
the greater political battle of 1912 will not be forgotten or lost 
sight of, for in a large measure 1910 will be a harvesting season 
against the gathering and housing two years hence. Earlier 
than has been the custom in Congressional elections in an "oil' ' 
year, both of the great parties are planning to get their best 
campaigners and spell-binders on the firing line at the beginning 
of activities, and every one. of them will be expected to start with 
an unusual amount of enthusiasm and do his level best to arouse 
the people to his way of thinking. 

President Taft has agreed to make at least ten speeches in the 
Middle West, but most likely he will nol enter the field until laic 

in the campaign — in October, he thinks. In September. Col I 

Roosevelt will commence pulling his end of the string in Kan- 
sas City, and will address the people at a few other points in I be 
West, but it is believed he will devote most of his time to repair- 
ing fences in New York where they have been somewhat dam- 
aged by the insurgent stampede. Then Governor Hughes wants 
to see the Republican machine in his Slate smashed before he 
takes his seat on the Supreme Bench, and as no man could do 
the job quite so effectually as Colonel Roosevelt, no doubt he 
will make a fiery machine-killing campaign in his home Stale, 
and in some measure to the neglect of other parts of the country, 
in any event, however, the former President will be booked for 
a speech at the weaker points in Ohio, Indiana and Iowa. But 
the Republican leaders fully realize that their party will have id 
walk-over in November, and as it is of the utmost importance 
that the second half of President Tai't's administration should 
not be saddled with a Democratic, and hence a hostile Congress, 
the National Congressional Committee has given notice that 
"every available Republican speaker will be called into service. 

Last week the Ohio Democratic State Convention not only re- 
nominated Governor Harmon by acclamation, but by the same 
unanimous vote pronounced him Ohio's first choice for the Demo- 
cratic party's candidate for President in 1913. But while boom- 
ing Judson Harmon, the convention by a vote of more than three 
to one weakened its party by turning William Jennings Bryan 
to the wall with a sort of a dull thud. Bryan has many enthu- 
siastic friends in Ohio who will be offended at the slight put upon 
their idol. It seems that Bryan had volunteered his advice to 
the Convention, which was to the effect that it name a candidate 
for the United States Senate, to be voted for at the primary. The 
Convention did not turn him down because it was opposed to the 
election of Senators by the people, but it took advantage of an 
opportunity that Bryan himself gave the party in Ohio to give 
him a humiliating snubbing. And as Bryan is not now, nor 
has he ever been, an admirer of Harmon, because the Ohio man 
helped to turn the Democratic tide against Bryan in 1896 to 
Palmer and Buekner, and to William McKinley. Therefore, 
Harmon starts in as a Presidential candidate with all the oppo- 
sition that Bryan can muster against him. All things consid- 
ered, therefore, and notwithstanding the insurgency of a few lie- 
publican Congressmen and Senators, the Republican party start < 
into the Congressional campaign a great deal freer from internal 
discord than does the Democratic. Still a lot of hard work will 
have to be done to give President Taft a Congress he can rely 
upon to sustain the party's policies. 

3B- 
Sixteen million dollars is the esti- 
Cheapness of mated cost of giving California a 

Goon Roads. complete system of public highways. 

If a reliable contractor would take 
the job at that price and guarantee good work, the State should 
make haste to close the contract. It is a bargain worth jumping 



at. Good roads are a very expensive luxury, but they are a neces- 
sity as well as a luxury, ami when one takes into account the 
benefits accruing to the region of country possessing them, the 
first cost of their making, great as it is, should deter no one 
from advocating their construction. The Eastern States long 
ago demonstrated to their own satisfaction that the benefits ac- 
cruing from good roads made their cost of little consequence, 
especially when their construction was so thorough thai subse- 
quent maintenance would be a tax too light to be felt. 

New York State has a total public highway mileage, which is 
a greater mileage than ;my half-dozen Stales together. Certainly 
all of this great mileage is not first class roads, but tin- State has 
more improved roads than all New England. More than 3,000 
miles of New York State's public roads are now under first-class 
construction, or reconstruction, rather, and 3,400 miles of mac- 
adam roads are open for public use; besides this highly improved 
mileage, there are 40,000 miles of earth roads that are properly 
shaped, crowned, depressions tilled, with culverts ami bridges in 
good repair. Besides this, there are 8,000 miles of gravel roads 
in first-class condition, which the several towns have constructed 
to improve their own business interests. The present available 

"road fund" of the State is $31,1 ,000, which is to be expended 

in the coming year in construction and in improvement of public 
highways. 

In the very near future, motor wagons in the bands of farmers 
will be the rule rather than the exception in California. It is 
estimated that with a motor wagon a given number of tons can 
be moved over good road- to a market fifty miles distant in less 
time and at a lower cost than the same tonnage could !«' moved 
ten miles by existing methods of farm transportation Over un- 
improved roads. With good roads, every fanner in California 
would lie from ten to forty miles nearer to the centers of busi- 
ness, produce and merchandise accumulation ami distribution, 
and thus save the present expense of railway freight lolls, re- 
ceiving, forwarding ami cartage charges, besides removing two 
or more middlemen who stand between his farm and the con- 
sumer of his produce, and exact commissions for brim: a acces- 
sary convenience, Sixteen million dollars would start a boom 
in good roads construction ill California that would keep on 
growing in energy and popularity until every public highway in 
the State would be a first-class road every day in the year. 



SOMETHING NEW. 

A split bottle of Aslicolony white or red wine for ].v. For 
sale at any restaurant, hotel or cafe. 



Pictures of all kinds made and framed to order by Fowzer, the ar- 
tist photographer. 3126 Sixteenth street, near Valencia. Finest child- 
ren's and professional work in the city. Photographs any time, any 
size, any price, any place. 




KCHAS.KEILUS & CO * 
HIGH CRAPE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Btorei. No Agents. 

BOOST for the FAIR 

Also booft your personal appearance by 
wearing one of our Spring and Summer 
Suits now selling at 

\ OFF 



Jewelers Building, Po& Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



Jttli ■-'. 1010. 



and California Advertiser 




'6WN CRIER 






A writer of national repute says that "Mr. Hears! seems 

to have become a confirmed pessimist." William Randolph 
Hearst never became anything — not even politics. He was born 
into the world just as he is to-day. That his cynicism is sulu- 
ratingly persuasive and atrociously insolent none can dispute. 
That his habit of deprecating good and imputing evil, of antici- 
pating failure ami misfortune, and his tendency to look on the 
dark side of everything were pulled into the world with his 
gloomy and despairing personality, none will doubt. Such pessi- 
mists are born, not made. And, finally, that God despises a 
cynic and loathes a pessimist is a truth equally indisputable. I 
would be a little sorry to have a harmless illusion so rudely dis- 
pelled, but 1 venture to think that long before the final results 
of liis present bushwhacking methods convince him of the folly 
of his ways, Mr. Hearst will have remarkably diminished ideas 
of himself. 

1 have been watching, with some inconsiderable interest, 

the conflict new going on between a much-advertised local author 
and the rest of the world, affecting the former's right to physi- 
cally smite an opponent without being subjected to the humiliat- 
ing necessity of accepting a smite in return. In settling this 
question, it may be to the disadvantage of the author that the 
rest of the world is very considerably his superior in point of 
age and its consequent unwillingness to have disputed a funda- 
mental maxim of sociology that every young man is an ass. If 
he would frankly admit these glaring deficiencies, sink bis in- 
dividuality, put his crude socialistic ideas to soak ami submit ule 
a maniier of shrinking bashfulness for the alleged premature 
ripeness of his psychical being, this, in the opinion of the large 
majority id' his critics, could not but improve his ordinal- 
and bring dignity, decency ami modest] of expression where they 
now liml vituperation and scandal. 

An English writer wants to know how a house can I" 

"anti-tubercular" when the lade-, obeying tin- dictates of fash 

ion. sweep up all the expei tion on footpaths and public 

walks, lake i] home in a dry stale, ami acatter germs broadcasl 
by shaking their long, trailing skirts in the room 

where Ma \ afterward Bleep? I don't know. 1 father gi 
can't. Hut why are the beastlj men permitted to expectorate all 
over the public walks ■<( England? Ii is plain that a tho 

wild Arabian horses COUld not pull one weak little woman's 
skirts from out that mes- of manliness where it is the fashion for 

skirts i.i trail. I m t oni' wild Irish policeman could control the 

tilth ejector. 

That some ">pots on the sun" may he permissible is only 

for the reason that all humanity is imperfect, and a round loo 

nt of perfection is unattainable; hut there must 

stains on the shields of the political standard hearer. These air 

the days when thi on inspection and the newspaper in- 

capable of spying out and magnifying a stain or a teat 
to be discovered. No gadder sighl can he than the exposure of 
a rent in the garment of one claiming a while and shining 
now is the appointed time for the sending of all ascension man- 

ihe laundry 'hat there may be eliminated therefrom 
rent and every offending particle <>f dirt that may ha 
from too familiar .out let with a wicked world. 



Among il tninenl scribes engaged exclusively by a 

morning iape! i report the big fighl al Reno are Mr. John I,. 
Sullivan and Mr. Jack Johnson, The connection oi either of 
these gentlemen in the character of correspondeni is surprising, 

for the reason that Mr. Sullivan was reported io have registered 
a imi never again to enrich the literature of that journal with 

the produci of Ins pen, owing to the latter's persistent habit of 
garbling his style and language, and to the circumstance that 
there has been no popular suspicion that Mr. Johnson could read 
ami write, In this connection, it is pleasing to notice with what 
ease Mr. Jeffries, of the opposition, is aide to conceal behind the 
features of an untutored gorilla all the erudition and polished 
diction of a ten dollar per week reporter, and at odd intervals 
between hailing the slats off his trainers and crunching the femur 
of a yearling calf, apply himself to the pleasing task of creating 
for posterity a true "History of my Life." And yet they claim 
that the game is brutalizing! , 

Already the air-hog is abroad and unless our law-makers 

bestir themselves or are bestirred, our very wind is likely to be 
cut off. The expression, "as free as air," is now a misnomer, the 
last remaining uhtrammeled possession of the poor man is in 
peril, and we are asked what we are going to do about it. 1 
will admit, with unaffected, and 1 hope characteristic, humility 
that, until the receipt of this communication, the necessity for 
wrestling with this mighty and momentous topic has never oc- 
curred to me. Upon subsequent reflection, however, there ap- 
pears to be no reason why the circumstance should not be fully 
and properly addressed to the public, and this I would be pleased 
to do were it not that I am entirely, and perhaps culpably, ignor- 
ant of the subject. 

In flie numerous open letters recently written, by men 

whom we lime elected to see that our laws shall he properly re- 
spected by ourselves, and caused Io appear in the public prints, 
a feu have, unwittingly, done good service to the cause of right 

and justice. Son f the writers opened themselves more widely 

than tho\ ever have before, ami made unconscious revelation of 
wdiat manner id' men they are. Bui so, for thai matter, lias the 
devil: while the cause of right ami justice continues to suffer 
right merrily. 

A Derrick County weekly has discovered a new verse 

writer who endeavors to make "screed" rhyme with "tread," and 
"face" with "gaze." and is of the opinion thai he can poo 
hotter" than Mr. Markham. At the same time the poetry of 
Mr. Sterling is flippantly, il nol slightingly, referred t,,. That 

this editor is" both culpable in his ignorance and criminal in his 
malice, no one will doubt. 





TRADE *Cyt~~~?%4 


r MARK 


BOOR 


D'S 


LONDON, ENG„ GINS 


DRY 

OLD TOM 

TWILIGHT 


CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Aeents Pacific Coast San Franci»co 



rancisco 




News Letter 



JtJLT 2, 1910. 



TEE CITY MAN IN CAMP. 
The Esquimo sleeps in his white. bear skin, 

All snug and warm, I am told. 
Last night I slept in my white bare skin, 

And caught a deuce of a cold. 

s s s 

A very charming widow from Louisiana is a guest at the St. 
Francis Hotel. Like most Southerners, she is possessed of a 
positive aversion for negroes, but, as she reads her newspapers, 
and is alive, she could not very well help being aware of the fact 
that there is a person called Mistah Johnson in the world who is 
very much in the public eye just now. The day after her arrival 
the lady had occasion to order a taxicab for herself and a friend. 
It was their purpose to get some salt sea air on the ocean boule- 
vard, and the chauffeur, having reached the drive, proceeded to 
let out a notch or two on his machine. The pace wasn't par- 
ticularly fast, but the lady from the South objected. 

"I see they are beginning to call that Johnsonizing," she re- 
proved. "So you will please drive at moderate speed." 
5 5 S 
Meat is always an interesting problem with us — particularly 
how to get it ; and since we are about to have another meat ordi- 
nance in place of the old one, consisting simply of an inspector, 
it is a matter of more interest still. Let us hope the inspector 
will be a man of most excellent taste and smell ; if he isn't, God 
help the poor — for the devil dances with the butchers. At a table 
in a semi-fashionable restaurant the other day the Looker On 
heard a captain of the high seas, one who should surely know, 
declare angrily that he had been served shark instead of tender- 
loin of sole. But the things the Looker On has been served at 
times in place of rump steaks would cause even a sea-captain to 
be thoroughly grateful for shark. This meat business recalls 
an incident concerning a certain individual who appeared to 
answer to some charge or other in Judge Deasy's court not long 
ago. He introduced himself by saying : 

"I am a butcher and an honest man, Your Honor." 

The judge looked at him scrutinizingly. "How is that?" he 

asked. "There is only one of you ?" 

W V V 
George Compere, representing the State- 
Commissioner of Horticulture, has re- 
turned from the Philippines, bringing 
with him nearly a million lady bugs. The 
lady bug, according to her abductor's con- 
ception of her, will make war upon the 
pest known as the mealie bug, which in- 
fects deciduous as well as citrus trees, and 
all other kinds of vegetation. The lady 
bug is a native of the East, and the mealie 
bug a native of California. Consequently 
between the two it will be war to the bit- 
ter end. And the million lady bugs form 
an invasion that will sweep California 
from Washington to Mexico. If the mealie 
bug wants to exist he will have to practice 
jiu-jitsu or turn into a flea — which is 
much the same thing. A friend to whom 
Compere was explaining this insect in- 
vasion was about to perpetrate, made the 



following objection: 

"Suppose," he said, "that in the end we have so many lady 
bugs that they will be crawling all around us— even getting into 
our soup. Or suppose they turn into a city pest like the bed- 
bug?" 

Compere smiled. "San Francisco has nothing to fear, at' any 
rate," he retorted. "She can never get the lady "bug" any worse 
than she has always had it." 

* T5 S 
It is rather exciting, after all, to be the son of a great man : 
people all want to "rubber" at you. And if you happen to be 
Teddy's Teddy, and have "Teddied" or gone and got married, 

and have your bride along — well Fond hope — how popular 

the dining room at the St. Francis was an evening not long ago, 
and one or two since! How strainingly and insistently eyes 
turned toward the entrance ! But Teddy, the carpet-maker, did 
not appear. He and his dainty bride had dinner in their apart- 
ments — which was much cosier and more chatty, of course. Be- 
sides, they wanted to be loving probably without being gaped at. 
Indeed, it is more than possible they couldn't help being loving. 
And since no one, if he is really in love — not even the son of 
a Great Man — can be "properly" loving, how could Teddy and 
his bride bear the scrutiny of several hundred eyes, all burning 
with curiosity. Downstairs in the St. Francis dining room the 
young groom might have been stiff — when he would have suffered 
criticism, and women would have said he was cold ; or, going to 
the other extreme, he might in a moment of impulsiveness have 
kissed his bride, when women probably would have fainted, hold- 
ing up their hands and exclaiming "How delightful !" The kiss 
of a great man's son is no different from any other man's kiss — 
ask any woman? But, of course, she couldn't know about 
Teddy's — until she had tried. It has been said that many wo- 
men kissed King Edward out of curiosity — no wonder he died 
early. But as he said, he did his duty. Our own King Roose- 
velt would take no such chances. It costs money even to kiss 
a Bible these days. But, .to return to our own King Roosevelt's 
son: in his own apartments he would dine on love alone if he 
choose — which he probably didn't. In spite of one's best inten- 
tions, one has a stomach, and it is often in that way — as many 
good women and doctors know — that he finds out he has a heart. 
A juicy beefsteak is a matter that no one can afford to pass up 
lightly. Men have died for the want of it oftener than they have 
died for the want of love. Teddy, the modest and unassuming 
son of the Great Man, however, is never likely to die for want of 
either. And because one must take off his hat to a real love af- 




.NT THE USE 
: CLOTHES 

that makes them old before 
their time; it's the rubbing and 
straining on a washboard — get- 
. ting the dirt out by main 
strength. 

MARLINE 

THE IMPROVED SOAP 

is in powdered form for your 

convenience. As it washes 

without rubbing, it saves the 

I worst of the wear. 



PEARLINE ENJOYS THE 
LARGEST SALE AMONG 

Intelligent Women 



Jul? 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



9 



fair wherever he beholds it — well, here's a little story. Some 
one hai that true lovi is sublime childishness. An. I so 

doth it answer to a child. The child in this instance n 
little flaxen-haired boy with big blue eyes and a tiny fingei in 
his mouth. Playing in the hotel rotunda while Ins mothei 

to catch a glimpse of the I.' ive ts, he suddenly sprang 

leution as she exclaimed under hei breath al their appearance. 

"There's Teddy, sweetheart." she pointed out, touching the 
little fellow on the arm. "Teddy, the son of Teddy, who killed 
the lions in Africa. Don't you know — your Teddy bear." 

"But, mamma, he isn't a Teddy bear," argued (he child, per- 
plexed. 

"Why, of course he's not." rejoined the lady. "But he's 
Teddy, and " 

The child, however, had broken away, and ran straight for the 
happy groom and bride. 

"Hello," he exclaimed eagerly. "Are you Teddy?" 

Young Boosevelt paused, smiling. "Yes, I am Teddy," he 
replied. 

The child's lips pouted iu criticism. "But you ain't no hear," 
he catechized. "You can't suck your paw or hug, can you?" 

A quick, mischievous smile lit Teddy, Jr.'s, face. "Ask my 
wife," he said. 

The child turned his wide-open blue eyes on the bride. "Can 
he?" he repeated seriously. 

The lady blushed, smiling at her husband. "I have never seen 
him suck his paw," she declared sincerely ; "but he can hug." 

« 5 8 

The Geokwar of Baroda has come and gone. The reflection of 
his jewels and the sinuous grace of his women, with their un- 
usual and striking costumes alone remain in memory to haunt 
us — the flash of their dark Oriental eyes, and that something 
about them which was all feminine and which American women 
lack. The Sun of India and the East burns not with reserva- 
tions, and the hearts bred under it know none. And like the 
glorious tiger of the jungle, to them belong that blood instinct 
and unconscious mastery of life and its philosophy that what we 
are accustomed to call civilization has long lost with the best 
part of its talents and soul. The Geokwar of Baroda was an in- 
teresting person, but hie WO D wen more SO. Their utter un- 
consciousness might well earn tl nvj of the greatest 

queen. Wo society queen, indeed, could approach it — for their 
mil onsi iousnesB belonged o I heir life, and the aillions 

of general ions of perfa i li of all their 

and learnh • that was truth 

in theil blood. No wonder hat men should turn and look after 
these women — and no wonder that women should look after them 
too. Whether in the «m or sauntering throug 

hotel, eager, curious, int. , - were always observing 

them, The] highly and lightly amuBed. One 

man with en it an introduction, lie 9 

it. but that was all. What need had these women of .him — be- 
ii race and silent conception of 
things. W'itli their dark, pool-cupped eyes, they looked through 
pond him. The . and the wild u 

smiled at his I ied hurry. Because of the 

Oriental women attracted, one young lady found 

it in her heart to be just a little 5 irried a day 

•nl the papers announced the wedding. But she was 

still betrothed the night she and her fiance beheld the I 

women in the ' 

"They have wholly and completely subdued every man in 
the house." remarked her companion, his eyes brighten 
admiration. 

His betrothed looked at him. "Ti. n women b 

reputation for being snake-charmers." she said. 



While n cannot be denied thai putting pol til into the unions 

i re ulted in vast benefit 

undeniable that it has I n a manifest injurj to the labor wo 

in union ranks. It is of no materia] benefit to labor that its 
chiefs divide the spoils of office or the graft of polities. The 
leaders in labor arc making the Los Angeles and the Seattle fight 
so as to entrench themselves as dictators in politics. It was an- 
nounced, last, week, in Los Angeles, that i Labor Party would 
be organized and that a fight would be made for every office 
within the gift of the people, from the highest to the lowest. 
Watch the result of that light in intelligent Los Angeles. Los 
Angeles has watched us lose our manufactories, and she knows 
which is the buttered side of her bread, and the Los Angeles 
mechanic knows well that it is better to have work all the time at 
$3.50 rather than work only half that time at $4.00 a day. Ten 
hours and a sure pay roll is far better than eight hours and only 
an occasional pay roll. It is the women and the children who 
feel the pinch. The leaders in labor make hay while the strikes 
last. When there is industrial peace the jaw-smiths in labor 
ranks starve. The only excuse for the labor union leader's ex- 
istence is continual strife. 

0-8 5 

Mrs. Clark Fisher, of Trenton, New Jersey, making an auto- 
mobile tour of the world, was tendered a banquet and reception 
at the Palace Hotel last week by the local representatives of the 
Locomobile Company. Among the good things edible and edify- 
ing was a speech by Frederick Thompson on "What I don't know 
about automobiles." This was in reply to Colonel Frank Mars- 
ton, who told with a poetry and eloquence befitting the occasion 
what he did know about them. Mrs. Fisher, a woman of much 
personality, and possessed of a keen sense of humor, in chatting 
with a couple of her entertainers on the dangers of automobiling, 
told the following story : 

"In the Palace Hotel here, yesterday," she said, "1 sat down 
near two society women who at th iment happened to be talk- 
ing over an auto accident. V mutual friend of the two, another 
lady, whose name I forget, bad been severely hurl. 

"I think it would be terrible to die in an auto accident ," I oil ed 

one of the pair, her face set in horror at the prospect. 

"Yes, particularly now that there are airships." returned her 
( ompanion seriously. 



"CANDIES OF RARE QUALITY" 




One of the Vacation Luxuries 

Ttikt* it alonq with you or purchase it from 
any of our Salt'.* Aqents 

C audit's 




Hare never been. 

itU'd m Purity 

— Quality 

a Ml 



J@to§®nn L®§@ @n& & 6S F@nH? 



99 



Caseygrams. 

The faro bank deposits in Reno are picking up. 

The next international affair to be fired np by Tex Rickard 
will be a spelling match between th' white race an' th' html. 

Anny chicken that crosses the road in front av dark Johnson, 
does so at th' peril av its life. 

Abraham Lincoln is th' man responsible fr th' prize fight 
There niver would have been a black champein tint fr him. 



"I'm opposed to thim prize fights," said Mrs. Casey, "but 
I can't help but be excited by the pictures that the papers print 
every day av Jack Johnson." 

"I think he is a feroshus looking man mesilf," said Casey. 
"The other day wan av the papers had a photograph av him 
standing by a chopping block, holding an axe in his hand and 
looking at a fat young rooster, and the expression on his lace 
was wan av th' most horrible ever put on by anny human being." 

"I suppose," said Mrs. Casey, "that they feed him on game 
roosters all the time so that he will be able to look at Jeff wit'oul 
jumping out av the ring and running away." 

"My dear Mrs. Casey," said her husband, "the question av diet 
for thim two has been thrashed over in the newspapers av the 
whole world manny times, but thim newspaper fellys, who are so 
acute in ordinary matters, have intirely overlooked wan very im- 
portant element av the affair. In ivry paper that you pick up 
you see that Jeffries has gone fishing, after breaking the back of 
wan of his sparring partners, tearing the arm off from another 
wan, and leaving all the rest av thim senseless from fright. And 
there is no day goes by but what he has fish to eat." 

"I have no doubt he enjoys them," said Mrs. Casey, "hut I 
sh'd think he'd get tired av eating thim every day." 

"There ain't anny doubt in my mind," replied Casey, "but 
what he does get tired av thim, but no matter how tired lie gets, 
he still keeps on eating them, and while nobody seems to have 
discovered what he does it for, there ain't anny doubt but what 
he is ingaged in improving his mind for July lib, for the great- 
est brain food in the world is fish." 

"And there ain't anny question about his needing a lot av 
brains whin he gets into the ring wit' th' naygur," said Mrs. 
Casey, "for he seems to be smart." 

"Annybody that thinks he ain't," said Casey, "is under a mis- 
apprehension, and he has manny a trick waiting to bring out av 
he needs to. Av he becomes convinced that he ain't able to beat 
the white man wit' his fists, he will no doubt fall back on his 
brains, and in case he sees that he is going to lose anny way, he 
may make up his mind that he will lose on a foul, and in me 
opinion that's why he is confining his diet to chickens." 

"Casey," said Mrs. Casey, "the pun that you make is a de- 
plorable wan, but I must confess that there is a grain av truth 
in what you say." 

"There ain't anny doubt about that," replied Casey. "Ami 
if the debate to be held at lteno proves that the white man is a 
better fighter than the naygur there ain't going to be anny great 
amount av satisfaction in it. If Jeff whips the naygur he will 
never fight annybody else. But if the naygur gets whipped, he 
will keep on in the game. Outside av Jeff there ain't annybody 
in the world who can whip him, and whin Jeff retires he will be 
king av all the fighters who are in the public eye." 

"I hear you," said Mrs. Casey, "but I don't understand you. 
What do you mean ?" 

"I mean," said Casey, "that a good manny little side bets have 
been overlooked by thim people who think they are wise. Av 
Johnson sees that he is bound to lose, he will immediately make 
up his mind that he would rather lose on a foul than anny other 
way, and if he should do so he will be right where he was before 
he stepped into the ring. The big half av the purse will go to 
the white race, the mental inferiority av the black will be estab- 
lished beyond anny doubt, thim who bet on Jeff will ride home if 
they are able to refrain from the inducement av the crap game 

and the faro bank, and thim who lost will be obscured in a cl ! 

av alkali dust whin they start to walk home, and whin the head- 
aches av the day after are cured by bromo and the great writers 
av fiction have told all they could get the papers to buy from 



them, the alarm clock will go off and the world will arouse from 
its sleep and whisper "Bunk.' 

"Highly plausible," said Mrs. Casey. "11111 do you think that 
there is anny chance av Jell' getting whipped?" 

"My dear' Mrs. Casey." said her husband, "annything in the 
world is possible except William Jennings Bryan for President 
av the United States. But as for the naygur whipping him. I 
have no idea that such will be the case. And whin the empire av 
the occasion has decided the affair, there will be great joy. Thim 
people who prefer other things than prize-fight news in Hie 
papers will have a chance warist more to refrain from reading ii 
because there will not be anny for thim to read, while mad 
crowds av thim who are opposed to anny such brutal sports will 
pay out good money lor a chance to see what the moving pictures 
say av the affair, and how the man looks who was whipped, and 
what the man who whipped him looks like." 

"I see that Jack London is looking for a yellow streak, anny- 
way," said Mrs. Casey. "I wonder if lie is going to find wan?" 

"Quite possible," said Mr. Casey, "but there ain't annybody 
who knows before hand. The naygur comes from a race that 
was born in slavery and had to stand around whin the white 
people spoke. The' thing that put the black race into slavery 
was not a question av muscle but a question av mind, and that 
is why Jeff is confining himself to fish, lie eats enormous quan- 
tities av thim, ami if lie should win the light, the fish trust av 
San Francisco will at once raise prices again. By whipping the 
naygur he will demonstrate that tiie white race has more brains 
than the black race, and in me opinion the next great contest 
for superiority will be a peaceful wan. Wit' (his tight the day av 
the ring goes by. There is no place in the country where the 
fight could be held except in Nevada, and even that State is last 
becoming civilized. Wit' California as a pace-maker, the sage- 
brush State will soon follow on, and then, whin the black race 
cannot prove that it has the most brains by beating up the 
white wan, the only way av determining the matter will be to 
hold a spelling match between Benjamin Ede Wheeler and Booker 
Washington wit' til' entire works av Thavilore Rooseveli as a 
prize." » 

"Anil 1 suppose," said Mrs. Casey, "that this is the lasi lug 
fight that will ever he held; all (he papers saj so, anny way." 

"Manny of thim who attend ii will never want to go to an- 
other wan," said Casey. 'Tvery gambling game that can sepa- 
rate man from his money is being moved into Reno. Ami ivery 
gambler that can find a place to put his game will have it run- 
ning wide open. There will not be enough beds in the town for 
all the people; there will hardly be enough to eat to go around, 
and the aggregation av hoboes that is already on its way their 
bills fair to be a historical convention av its kind." 

"It's a good thing fer the town, though," said Mrs. Casey. 

"No doubt about that." said her husband : "there will be 
more money there than thim people have seen since the boom 
days, ami whin Nevada people find themselves in (he midst av 
money, they are quick lo acquire it. If they cannot get ii by 
renting rooms hv the minute, (hey will iniplov gas pipes and 1'aro 
layouts, and there ain't anny doubi hut what if the people of th.' 
town had anny say they would nominate Jeffries for President 
and Hi' naygur for vice-president, for thim two have fairly saved 
the town. And on the birthday av the nation, whin little children 
mi -where are repeating the Declaration av Independence and 
wondering what it means annywav. the eyes of the world will 
turn toward the United States. The Panama Canal Exposition 
in San Francisco wi!l lie forgot, the greatness av the latest scien- 
tific discovery will be untlioii'jlil of, and the wan and only thing 
that is talked of is the big fight." ' 

"Casey." said Mrs. Casey, "ain't it a pity that you ain't going 
to gel a chance (o see it. I have a notion thai y'd like to go." 

"I have no notion av thai kind whatever," answered Casey. 

"I know I'd like to see it. and if you weren't the wise' old woman 
that you are. I won hi." 



Burns Hammam Baths 

Sulphur Baths— Electric Baths 

Eddy and Van Ness Ave. and Kearny and Jackson Streets 

LADIES' DEPT.— Eddy and Van Ness Ave. only 



July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




PLEASWE'bli) 




!Sy IPshuiD (G©ir§©iifc 

David Kessler at tin Van Ness. 

A unique personality is David Kessler, the noted Yiddish 
actor, who filled a brief engagement at the Van Ness Theatre 
las! week. Among- ids own following he is considered the Mans- 
field and [rving of his profession. In New York, Kessler has 
an enormous following among Ids own people, and there are no 
less than five theatres devoted exclusively to the Yiddish drama. 
Considered from the standpoint of versatility, those Yiddish 
players are without doubt the most wonderful actors on earth. 
One evening they will play tragedy, and the next evening I'am- 

comedy, and the very next evening they will produce a preten- 
tious opera, and they do them all remarkably well. It is from 
these people that we have lately secured Bertha Kalich and Nazi- 
mova. Tl will be remembered that last year the Lieblers of New 
York, the noted theatrical managers, undertook to star David 
Kessler in English with a strong English supporting company. 
A play was selected and the company opened in Boston in due 
time. Without exception all the Boston critics hailed Kessler 
ms the legitimate successor of Mansfield, stating that since the 
days of the wonderfully clever and eccentric Mansfield no such 
powerful work had been seen in the Hub City. Kessler then 
opened in New York under the most auspicious circumstances, 
but in the Metropolis of the East, where he should have at least 
received encouragement and due praise for conscientious efforts, 
he was literally slashed to ribbons by the critics. Kessler told 
me himself that this so took the hear! out of him thai he resolved 
at once to abandon the English-speaking stage Forever, and <ro 
back among his own people, where hi' is an idol. This is a great 
pity, too, as the ranks of the really great actors of our stage 

was never so poorly represented as al present. We n led Kessler 

sorely. These New York critics are a weird Lot Biirely. They 
think they should set (he standard of these United States in 
matters theatrically. Why not give the rest of the country a 
chance to see and to judge I'm- themselves? Kessler and his com- 





the dainty English singer of <l<iinhi ttory songs, who 
will appear ihi.< Sunday afternoon at tl>e Orpheum. 

piny expect to r.'turn here for three days the first week in July 
at the Van Ness Theatre, an. I I earnestly advise all my readers 
not to miss seeing ibis wonderful man. You can understand his 
art and his work thoroughly without knowing his language. His 
expression and bis pantomi vivid and real, so wonder- 

fully impressive, that a kn if the Yiddish language is 

unnecessary. Kessler staled that Bertha Kalich was his leading 



Mrs. Fisl-e, who hh 
»•<•(•<■«■. comment iy night, -Inly ilh. 




THE READERS- 
NEW BROWSING CORNER 

PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Our rooms are cordially open to visitors. 
329 Grant Ave., between Potft and Sutter Streets 
San Francisco 



13 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



woman for a lone;- time, and he furthermore states that there are 
a number of still cleverer women among the Yiddish companies 
of New York. He tells me that his repertoire of plays is enor- 
mous, numbering hundreds, and that they run the entire gamut 
of human emotions from very grave to very gay. You should 
hear Kessler sing. He has a marvelous, high baritone never 
heard outside of grand opera. He is a gifted man, who would 
have been a wonderful and notable figure, indeed an ornament, 
to our English speaking stage. 

Since writing the foregoing, I have learned from an absolutely 
reliable source that next season New York will have no less than 
eight theatres devoted exclusively to the Yiddish drama. Two 
of these theatres are owned by David Kessler, who besides being 
the most popular Yiddish actor in the Metropolis, is an extensive 
property owner. 

The Orpheum. 

The bill this week is not as good as we have been accustomed ti 
at this house lately, but then we must bear in mind that we have 
had "vaudeville extraordinary" at the Orpheum for some time. 
and the program this week is no doubt somewhat of a reaction, 
but at that, it is, on the whole, satisfactory, but two numbers 
hot being Orj heum class. One of these opens up the activities. 
It is a farce, which features Lewis McCord and a company of five 
people. The author calls it "Winning in Wind." The plot and 
idea is a direct steal from Gillette's "All the Comfort? of Home." 
The author has made poor use of the splendid material he had 
at hand, and it is a pity to see six people waste their time and 
efforts on a proposition so entirely devoid of wit and humor as 
this sketch. McCord no doubt thinks he is a comedian, but he 
makes a sorry attempt to live up to his belief. Peter Donald and 
Meta Carson are next in their Scorch diversion. Donald is a rare 
comedian, unctuous and witty. It. is fun pure and simple. lie 
is capably assisted by Miss Carson, who is pretty and can sing 
and dance creditably, too. Though we have seen them here be- 
fore, their act proves just as entertaining as ever, and the audi- 
ence thoroughly enjoys them. A Danish gentleman styling him- 
self Mr. Clement De Lion, does some neat palming with twelve 
billiard balls. It is all verj' clever and dexterous, and consti- 
tutes a neat and novel act. Clown Zertho and his twenty odd 
canines of various kinds and breeds end the first half of the 
program. It is a very good act of the kind, and Zertho works 
hard. Of course all the usual stunts are gone through which 
we see in animal acts of this kind. It is entertaining, though, 
and the act is capitally mounted with special scenery and effects. 
Maud and Gladys Finney open the second half with their aquatic 
exhibition. They are two exceedingly handsome girls of stun- 
ning proportions, and their work in their small gjass tank bor- 
ders on the marvelous. One of the ladies is under water a full 
two minutes at one period of their act. Their splendid exhibi- 
tion is fully appreciated, and they are awarded unstinted ap- 
plause. Next in order is Annabell'e Whitford, who gained some 
reputation as the original Brinkley girl. She was lor some years 
one of the features of Ziegfeld's Revues, which we believe is I In 1 
correct way of spelling the annual show that Ziegfeld springs 
on the big Eastern Metropolis. Miss Whitford is a tall and at- 
tractive looking young lady, not pretty, but very good to look at. 
She can sing fairly well, and ends her act by sailing over the 
heads of the audience in a mechanical contrivance, scattering 
flowers and flashing her light in the faces of sheepish looking 
men. The best part of her act is her accompanist, a remarkably 
clever pianist, who is down on the programme in verv small type 
_ as Hans Hanke. Prank White and Lew Simmons arc next, in 
twenty minutes of black face stupidity. It is one of those acts 
which we have come to look upon as inevitable, and which every 
now and then flash across an Orpheum horizon. It is vapid anil 
silly to a degree. The bill ends with "The Five Olympiers,'" 1 
two women and three men. with bronzed bodies, who do some 

very effective posing. It is all very beautiful. We have s i 

acts of this kind before, and to a certain extent there is alii - 
a similarity, hut the Olympiers are as good as the local stage 
has ever shown us. The moving pictures are lair. 

* * * 

"Cam ill e" at the Alcazar. 

Miss Harned's interpretation of "Camille" at the Alcazar this 
week is sowell done that many in the audience gave in to their 
sympathetic natures and dimmed their eyes to such an extenl thai 
many parts of the scenes were hardly visible to them. "Camille" 
was conceived by Alexandre Dumas, Jr., and was adapted for use 



in this country by the late Matilda Heron, who first presented ii 
fifty-four years ago in Cincinnati, ami thereafter until she re- 
tired from the stage it -was her favorite vehicle. Miss Harned, 
however, has successfully subjected the play to a thorough re- 
vision and has eliminated the unnatural scenes and superfluous 
dialogue, inserting numerous bits of •'business" that add to the 
general effectiveness — in brief, transforming it from a rather 
old-fashioned creation into one that complies with the require- 
ments of modern dramaturgy while retaining all the heart appeal 
that has made it a classic. 

(if the story of "Camille" it need only be said that it lias pro- 
vided foundation for almost every play that treats of a man's in- 
fatuation with a woman whose fame was not fair when he became 
enslaved. When she first meets Armand, there is little likelihood 
of Camille yearning for domesticity, but her character becomes 
chastened by his devotion and her own love, and when the in- 
evitable severance of their relationship is effected, she is the re- 
cipient of the human sympathy that is evoked by human suf- 
fering. 

Miss Harned works upon the emotions of her auditors to such 
an extent that finally they seem to come in touch with her, as if 
she were a "Camille" in reality, and not a "Camille" of the stage. 
Her acting is as vivid and powerful as any one would care to see 
or hear. 

William Courfenay, too. warms up to his work as well as we 
have ever seen him. His scene with Camille in the third act was 
a delightful pine of acting, ami gained the spontaneous applause 
of the audience. The other members of the company live up to 
their parts very well, as they nearly always do. 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and Stelner Street*. 
Phones— West 1400. Home 8. 4242. 



New 



Belasco and Mayer, Owners and Managers. 

Week commencing with matinee on Monday, July -1th, farewell ap- 
pearance of America's distinguished actress, VIRGINIA IIAHNEli. 
supported by WILLIAM COURTENAY and the Alcazar players, In 
Pinero's masterpiece, 

THE SECOND MRS. TANQUERAY. 
A perfect production. 

Prices — Night, 25c. to $1; matinee, 25c. to 50c. Matinee Saturday 
_and Sunday. Seats for sale at box office and Emporium. 

OrVheUTU O'Farrell Street. 

\SI JJIWWIIV Bet Stockton and Powall. 

Safes! and Most Magnificent Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

A GREAT NEW SHOW. 
LILY LENA, the Dainty English Singer of Dainty Story Songs; 
LOIE PULLER'S BALLET OF LIGHT; Special Feature— WILL 
M. CRESSY and BLANCHE PAYNE in Mr. Cressv's one-act play, 
'Grasping an Opportunity;" CAPTAIN MAXIMILION GRUBER & 
MISS ADELINA'S EQUESTRIAN REVIEW: FIVE OLYMPIERS; 
WHITE & SIMMONS; HE LION; NEW ORI'I JEr.M MiiTION PIC- 
TURES. Last week, immense hit ANNABELLE WHITFORD 
the Original Brinklev Girl. 

Evening prices— 10c. 25c, 50c, 75c. Box seats $1.00. 
Matinee prices (except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 26c, 60c. 
Phones DOUGLAS 70; HOME C 1670. 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottlob, Marx & Co., Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Ste. 
Phone Franklin 160. 
Home C 678J. 



July 1th. Harrison Gre: 



Two weeks, beginning Monday Night 

P Iske presents 

MRS. FISKE, 

mSi„^s, J ^CK? T |gAl? MPANY ' ' V ' y 6Ve 8 il "" SatUrfla » 

Wednesday matinees only, PILLARS OF society. 



Savoy Theatre 



McAllister Street, 
Above Market. 



TO-LET 



By the afternoon, evening or week, till August 1, 1910. 
Apply at theatre office dally, from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



JULT 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Mrs. Fiske, whose position .is Vmerica's representative dra- 
ttii srtisl is beyond dispute, is to annear at the Columbia Thea- 
tre during the two weeks beginning Monday evening, July lili. 
in her famous characterization "I "Becky Sharp," and for two 
single performances rs Lona Heswel] in Ibsen's "Pillars of 
Society." "Becky Sharp" will be presented Eor all evening per- 
formances, as well as for the Saturday matinees, while "Pillars 
of Society" will be the bill at two special mid-week matinees, to 
be given on the respective Wednesdays of the engagement. 

* * * 

James K. FTacketfs season at the Alcazar, commencing July 
11th, promises to continue the success of the "two-dollar star" 
experiment which Relasco & Mayer inaugurated with the en- 
gagement of Virginia Harried, for then' is. no actor in America 
better or more favorably known than the man whose name is in- 
ilissohihlv linked with "The Prisoner of Zenda." He is booked 
for six weeks, opening with "The Prisoner of Zenda," and will 
appear also in "'Monsieur Beaucaire," "Don Caesar's Return," 
"Samson," "John Glade's Honor," and "The Pride of Jennieo." 
He »ill bring with him Miss Beatrice Berkley, an English actress 
who was his leading woman last season, and Arthur Hope, one 
of the best "heavy men" in the country. Alcazar players will 
fill the remainder of the easts. 

* * * 

Virginia Harned will make her farewell appearance at the 
Alcazar next week. "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray" wilt be given 
for one week commencing Monday matinee. July 4th. It will also 
be the farewell week of charming Bessie Barriscale. 

Miss Lily Lena, the dainty English singing comedienne, has 
just returned from London to fulfill another engagement over 
the Orpheum circuit, and will make her reappearance next 
Sunday matinee. 

Loie Fuller's ''Rallet of Light" will be one of the big attrac- 
tions next week, and it is not too much to predict that its colos- 
sal success in Boston and New York will be duplicated here. 

Will M. Cressy and Blanche Dayne have been secured as a 
special feature of next week's programme, and will appear in 
Mr. Cressy's sketch of New Hampshire life, "Grasping an Op- 
portunity." 

Captain Mavimilion Grnher and Miss Adelina's Equestrian 

Review includes three animals — an elephant, a horse and a pony. 

Next week will he the lasl of the Five Olvmpiers. White and 

Simmons, De Lion, and of the beautiful A.nnabelle Whitford, 

the Original Brinkley Girl. 



The question as to who is the mosl popular Native 

Daughter of the Golden Wesl is <1 ne big thing thai i- agi- 
tating the Native Sens and Daughters, in particular, and the 
public a I large, in general, of the State '>f California. A conl si 
is now on for the selection of "California," the Queen oi the 
Admission Day 1910 Festival, to be held in San Francisco, Sep- 
tember 8th, 9th and 10th, big bundles of ballol i en Benl 
to every Parlor of Native Daughters in the state, and in many 
localities voting is going on with a \im. 

The Queen musl l>e a Native Daughtei in _ l standing in 

o E the [enters, and the i obtaining the highest num- 

ber of rotes «ill be accorded the distinction of being the "Firs! 
Lady" of the big celebration, and the fourteen next fell. .wing in 
number of votes will he chosen 

ami ai i as M aids of Honor to Queen California. After the votes 
are i ounted, I be fori one e Queen and her Maids « ill Ix 
a ten davs' outing in the Yosemite Valley. Vol s and full par- 
ticulars ol 

the Admission Day Festival, 1050-1058 Phelan Bu 
Francisco. 



THE ADVERTISING MEN'S CONVENTION. 

Last week's convention in this city of the Pacific Coasi Ad- 

.'ii, ing Men's \ ocial n « a a notable ei ent, and its re nl 
cannot fail to be beneficial to San Francisco and Pacific I 
business. It is just, such meetings, where men in close touch, 
as the advertising men are, with both merchant and customer, 

may exchange ideas, that bring ahout that publicity se vital to 
I ra ile activity. 

Advertising is now recognized as one el' the lea. ling p, 
sinus. Proper advertising is an essential lo trade, as ever] es 
perienced business man knows, fur one may have the best goods 
in the market and fail to sell them unless he lets people know 
that he has them. In these days of keen competition, trade must 
be sought; it will not come of itself, and the best possible way 
to seek it successfully is to advertise. 

An important feature of the Convention was the thorough 
discussion of the various means of advertising San Francisco 
The great value of newspaper, magazine and periodical advertis- 
ing was fully brought out in this discussion, which was partici- 
pated in by the best publicity experts. 

The convention was a complete success in every way, and its 
consequences are sure to be extremely profitable. 



TAKE A 

VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

TO THE COUNTRY 'WITH YOU 
VICTORS from $10 to $100 on the Easiest Terms 

From our 100,000 Records you and your friends can be 
entertained at a moment's notice by foremost bands, the 
greatest opera artists, funny comedians, sweet singers, and 
all kinds of clever people — take along all the latest song hits 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

Sleinway and Other Pianos. 

Player Pianos of All Grades Victor Talking Machine! 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS. OAKLAND 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



I ncomparably better than any other in its class 
A Little Lower Priced Than the Others 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

118-117 Kearny Street near Post 



Atnadee Toullin, the well-known artist and popular 

Bohemian, after several years' absence in Paris. Mexico and New 
Mexico, ■■- just returned to this city, and has taken a studio 
;. Jonllin has made a feature of Indian paint- 
or some time. One of (he h.-I pictures he has prod 

"The Medicine 'Man." recently exhibited at the Bohemian Club. 
This has caused -o much favorable comment that the club has 
painting, and it will be hung in their new quarters 
n as they arc finished. Mrs. Joullin is al- 
and is dec \ork in Joullin'- 



A SKIN OF BE.UTT IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BCAUTIEIER 

Removes Tan. Pimples, Freckles. MotS-Paicfces.. 
Rash and Skin Diseases, and every blemish oo 
beanM?. and defies detection. It Ha* stood the lest 
of 60 rears: no other ha*, and it to harmless tre 
taste il lo be sure it is properly made. A«epl no 
eounterfeil of smilar name. The ditunouished Dr. 
L. A. Say rr said to a lady of the bail - to* (a patient): 
"As ran ladies will stse tkeaa. I recaaasead Coa- 
rand's Cream' as lb* least aarmfiH «f all tW Skia 
prfoaraltaai." - 

For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Coods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and adults. ExqtusUesy perfumed Relieves Skin Irntan'ons. cures Suo- 
bera and rtixJen an excellent compiexioo Price 25 Cents, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair , Price % l.OO. b- nail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. H Great Jones St.. New York C.ty. 




14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



K»^7 




own, 



-^f 




There is a sob squad at Santa Barbara. Of course the squad 
doesn't sob right out loud, because it's almost impossible to sob 
without distorting one's face, and tears have been known to 
spoil the most exquisitely prepared complexion. So the sobs are 
sort of ingrowing and very painful. The chief sufferers are 
Helene Irwin, Elizabeth and Marian Newhall and Julia Lang- 
home. Young Boosevelt and his bride are the unwitting causes 
of the malady. It was expected, of course, that the young couple 
would spend their treacle moon at the smart hotel, and the out- 
siders all calculated that the San Francisco contingent, had the 
market cornered. Helene Irwin is engaged to Templeton 
Crocker, who knows the bride very well, and altogether it was 
a foregone conclusion that this little set would annex the Teddy, 
Jr.'s, introduce them to the sea and the sands and the lovely 
roads. This congenial set is very intolerant of any one who has 
shown poor taste in ehosing parents. Inherited wealth is a pass- 
word, and a gentleman is primarily one who docs no! have to 
work for a living. But a sweet and lovely spirit can reside in 
people committed to the aforementioned theory, and with demo- 
cratic zeal these young people decided to regard young Iioosevelt 
as a bit eccentric, not really vulgar. They prepared lo receive 
them just as though Teddy did not know the difference between 
body Brussels and Axminster. 

But alas for the high resolves and noble purposes ! The Roo 
velts did not go to the smart hotel ! Instead they took a modest 
cottage at lovely but inexpensive Montecito, and prepared to en- 
joy Santa Barbara in a two-sy sort of way. A friend who is 
staying at Montecito writes me that they are as cordial and un- 
affected as any young couple who ever honeymooned there, but 
they show a distinct preference for their own society, which 
symptom has often appeared in the first few months of married 
life. They hold themselves just as pleasantly remote from the 
smart set as from the common or garden variety of seasider. 
There is nothing supercilious, no taint of condescension in this 
aloofness, and the common or garden variety respects it; but 
the smart set, particularly the San Francisco contingent, has 
about decided that after all, a man who would choose to work for 
a living, especially when he lias a "pull," is more than eccentric 
— he is a bit of a vulgarian ! Otherwise he would have met their 
advances more than half way. 

© © © 

One good story has not yet been told anent the short visit of 
the Boosevelts at the St. Francis Hotel in this city. Every one 
in the hotel developed genuine caoutchouc in the cosmogonv "I 
the neck, but there was very little opportunity to exercise the 
elastic, for the young couple sought the retirement of their own 
apartment. At the hotel is a matron whose husband lias re- 
cently amassed a fortune in oil. and when wealth is a recent 
acquisition, time is apt to lag heavily. So this matron had 
looked forward to a few rubber thrills which she did not get. She 
was unfortunate enough not to be in the lobby when they regis- 
tered. Voila! (she is studying French), she would sit around 
and wait. She did. Void ! She has spotted them ! She over- 
hears them engage a machine for a ride to ihe Cliff, and she 
hastily engages another, jabs a hat on her coronet braids and 
trails after them. They alight and order luncheon at Ihe Cliff 
House. She manages to get the next table and orders an elabo- 
rate repast. By training both ears on them, she can catch a 
word or two of their conversation. After a few moments of 
concentrated effort, not on the food but in their direction, she 
hears a word that chills her to the marrow (not on toast — her 
own marrow.) The word was Frederick. What's in a name? 
Fred and Ted sound just about the same, and yet the good dame 
would never have rushed after them if she had not confused 
them. But it was impossible to confuse Frederick with Theo- 
dore, even if Fred did look something like Ted's published photo- 
graphs. Further aural concentration developed the fact that this 
young couple came from Los Angeles. The enterprising matron 
was out the cost of a luncheon and automobile hire, and of course 



PALACE HOTEL 

Entirely rebuilt since the fire. The 

MUSIC IN THE COURT 

during and after dinner 
is a feature of the city 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

The largest hotel company in the world. 
Also operating the palatial 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



she took it out on the chauffeur — who had not misled her. So 
he fell privileged to tell his next fare about the adventure. 
© © © 

Coincident with the court martial of Lieutenant-Colonel Rob- 
ert F. Ames, Twelfth Infantry. F. S. A., at Manila, comes the 
news that Marian Andrews Bruguiere will figure in Hie divorce 
suit of Mrs. Henry Clews. Jr. In the Philippines one scandal 

is unpleasantly involving the, first Mrs. Bruguiere, and now fr 

Paris conies the report thai the second Mrs. Bruguiere will be- 
come Mrs. Clews just as soon as the present Mrs. Clews h.\< I n 

freed. Mrs. Clews, like all the others quilted into this patch- 
work romance, has essayed matrimony .several times with a con- 
spicuous lack of success. She was originally Miss Lulu Morris 
of Baltimore, and later acquired the distinguished name of Geb- 
hardt, with Freddie thrown in. Their marriage was not a suc- 
cess, and she evidently thought she had a real clue to happiness 
when Clews came along — but that has likewise proven an in- 
efficient talisman. 

Mrs. Clews has a gorgeous home in Paris, the Villa Said, and 
I hear that Ned Greeowav is a frequent visitor in her salon. 
Edward M. is the real Baltimore terrapin, and therefore knew 
the Morris family in Maryland. There is no occasion tor ner- 
vous tremors about Ned's bachelor's vows becoming wobbly, for 
Mrs. Clews has shown a predilection for a man of title. It is 
correct now to choose a successor before you dives! yourself of 
an incumbrance, which is only following the homely adagi . 
Never throw out the dirtv water till you have clean." 
' © © © 

From the same source T learn that while Greenway is having 
a magnifique time in France, he is not going lo bring back an 
accent. He is not stabbing at the language, and ihe San Fran- 
cisco girl in the party had to poke him in the ribs '<> keep him 
from snoring out loud at Chantecler. lie slept sweetly through 
all the double entendre of the reception, and woke up with a 
benign smile when the cock crowed. "1 was dreaming — and 
thought I was down at a week-end party at the Tcvis place — 
the chickens there are so noisy, too!" 

While his appreciation of Ihe French drama may be sopo- 
rific, he has taken a wide-awake interest in getting new ideas for 
the social season. The first Assembly d nee i- dale,] For Novem- 
ber -1th. and it is just possible that it will be a cotillion- at all 
events, one of the Assemblies will take that form, for Ihe Czar 
has already shipped 1" (his pori a bos of the handsomest and 
smartest favors turned mil in Paris. With new idea- --..iked in 
Paris brine, Greenway will doubtless make the other aspirants 
cast a verdant shadow. 



WEDDING PRESENTS AT 
NATHAN-DOHRMANN COMPANY'S 

This store is famous for the beauty and 
individuality of its offerings for bridal gifts. 
Most of them are obtained abroad by our 
representatives and are selected from the best 
workmanship of France, Germany and 
England. 

NATHAN-DOHRMANN COMPANY China K i Swl, v "" Dd 
UNION SQUARE, GEARY AND STOCKTON STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



To return to Manila, via Paris. A- soon as her prese 
not required by the authorities, Mrs. Janney will return lo San 
Francisco. She says she will lead the simple life I" 1 "'- but sim- 
plicity and the former Madeline McKissick have ae\ n moved in 

the same set, and if she does settle in her own ho she will 

surely furnish the scandal tigers with some interesting tid« 

bits. She lias upheld Chaplain John E. Dallam, who wa 
rimanded for censuring Captain Wickersham, who lefl thi din- 
ner party when trouble seemed unavoidable. The chaplain said 
that the Captain should not have deserted, and referred to Ins 
conduct as "heartless am 1 , cowardly." For this, the chaplain 
was censured in general orders as a "busy-body." The chaplain 
says his rebuke to the Captain was in line with his duties as a 
clergyman, and the fair young widow nods approvingly. This 
is probably the first time in her life that Mrs. Janney has up- 
held a clergyman. 

© © © 

Mrs. Lawrence Scott (Caro Crockett) bears a charmed life, 
for which every one is very grateful. She has been mixed up 
in some dreadful automobile accidents, and always escapes with 
a few scratches. The Lawrence Scotts were the only other occu- 
pants of the car when Mary Crocker Harrison was hurled to her 
death. Several times since then, Mrs. Seott has been in smasli- 
ups. but nothing makes a dent in her motor enthusiasm — not 
even the collision with the Payson machine the other day. Harry 
Scott, who was driving his cousin, likewise escaped with a few 
scratches, but he has bad an attack of "nerves." 

Jennie Crocker, who returned from the East the first of Ihe 
week, has replenished her garages, and now has (he laiesc 
caprices in interior decoration. Miss Crocker is looking very 
pretty these days, and is affecting the very small hats and thi 
tailor suits that look as if the material had given out before the 
skirt was completed. The ultra smart tailor skirt must stop 
short of measuring just a yard and a half around the bottom, if 
it goes a notch further, it loses class, and cannot sei up as a 
smart skirt. 11 is probably a summer fancy, but while it lasts, 
if ma has any little scraps around you can probably get severa| 
tailor skirts out of them. 

© © © 

There are numberless versions of the return of Margaret 
Illington to the stage. Here is one that is guaranteed bj thi 
Tacomaites, and it comes as a distinct surprise to those whfl 
thought thai while "I'M." Bowes had married an actress, his 
fortune was not in stage money. But my Northern Lnformanli 
insists that Bowes has had Financial troubles, thai he could not 
keep up the magnificent house he purchased for his bride, and 
that they have of late been living in on apartment building he 
owns up there, where he also has his offices. Mrs. Bowes' return 
to the stage Is, according to this prophet, a wifely and devote^ 
attempt to make good her husband's financial losses. 



DRESS YOUR HAIR WELL 

The New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors at 
130 Geary, near Grant avenue, are equipped 
with all European and up-to-date appli- 
ances for Hair Dressing and Manicuring. 

MRS. A. W. FINK 

Has had extensive and varied experience 
in European and Eastern Hair Dressing Par- 
lors and has introduced many new ideas. 

SPECIAL, FOR THIS WEEK ONLY, 

Great Sacrifices in 31 and 4 ounce, 36-in. Switches 



Parisian Nail Bleach, SS 



New 

Itraovrs All Slains 



Try a course of scalp treatments by our well known 
specialist. Given by the Therapeutic System. 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK— Ten Treatments, $6.00 

New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors 

130 GEARY STREET 



— ! 

life, s id Sum > ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 ■_■ 'I hing "i es - ind w don'l know 

whether a divorce is e 



TO CELEBRATE THE FOURTH, 
ii Cannon Flag and Shield Boxes ed with candles Ap- 
propriate- i-\- ui-iii .-i a Ml,-, niiiy i , ,i younf old, k.1 all ' 10 

Mi i s. mis' o stores: Phelan Building-, Fllln an Ne«s 

at Sutter; una 28 Market street, near Ferry. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF JAMES "WOODS 

The farthest 
advance of 
science in 
service 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 




] HOTELSAVOY 



SEATTLE 

"TvK-Ire Stories of 
Solid Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping dist'Li. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates. SI. 50 op 




Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2. SO, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
■With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 



A comfortable, hieh order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN, formerly manager of St. 
Duncan's. 



Hotel Von Dorn 

242 Turk St., San Francisco 



REMODELED AND UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



Telephones: Franklin 3666 
Home C 3666 



Rates: European $ 1 .00 and up 
American $2.60 and up 



Geo. A Eastman, Manager 



SAN MARCO HOTEL 
and RESTAURANT 

M. DeBRET, Proprietor 
(formerly with Marchand's) 
N. E. Cor. Geary and Mason Streets 



NOW OPEN 



San Francisco 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



S@<skS m<& W<B\?mm(2& feinM 



WEDDINGS. 

Brashear-Ertz.— June 30th.— Miss Eleanor Brashear and Mr. Coleridge 
Ertz were married at the Sweden borgian Church, on June 30th. 

Dille.— June 28th.— Miss lone Dille, daughter of Mrs. F. M. Dille, and 
Lieutenant Reginald Heber Kelley, U. S. A., were married in All 
Saints' Church, Palo Alto. 

Hussey-Adams. — June 30. — Miss Helen Hussey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John B. Hussey, and Mr. Frederick Adams, were married at the 
home of the bride's parents on June 3<Hh. 

O'Connell-Geary. — Friends of Mr. J. J. Geary, General Passenger and 
Freight Agent of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, are congratu- 
lating him upon his wedding with Miss Lucille E. O'Connell, which 
took place in Star of the Sea Church last Tuesday morning. The 
bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William B. O'Connell. of 3::2 
Eighth avenue, and a sister of Father T. J. O'Connell, of St. Joseph's 
Church, Alameda. After the ceremony the couple left for a honey- 
moon trip through Colorado and the Northwest. 

Paxto'n-Talbot. — June 25th. — Mrs. Susan Darneal Paxton, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hervey Darneal, and Mr. William H. Talbot, took place on 
June 25th, at the home of the bride's parents, in Alameda, 

Rooney-Young. — June 15th. — Miss Edith Aileen Rooney and Francis Jos. 
Young were married on Wednesday, June 15th, at the Vendorne in 
San Jose. The couple will be at home after July 1st at 2211 Broder- 
ick street. 

Sutton-Sherman. — June 30th. — Miss Helen' Sutton, daughter of Mrs. Allen 
Mackenzie Sutton, and Mr. Henry Edwin Sherman, were married at 
the home of the bride's mother, June 30th. 
Turner- Seitz. — .Tune 2Mth. — Miss Ashleigh Turner and Mr. Joseph Seitz 
were married at Mountain View on June 29th. 

WEDDINGS TO COME. 
Turner-Ruhien. — July 16th. — Miss Emma Turner and Lieutenant George 
Ruhlen, U. S. A., will take place July 16th in the Presidio Chapel. 
Reception at the home of the bride's brother-in-law and sister, Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Frederick Stafford. 

DINNERS. 

Franklin. — Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin was a hostess at a dinner given re- 
cently at the Palace Hotel. 

Huntington. — Mrs. M. E. Huntington entertained informally at dinner at 
her Pacific Avenue home on June 23d, when her guests included Mr. 
and Mrs. Brockway Metcalfe, Miss Marion Huntington, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Gilbert Brooke Perkins. 

McNear. — Mrs. George McNear entertained at the Claremont Club huuse 
at dinner in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Lang of Portland, who 
are visiting Mrs. Sam Bell McKee on Vernon Heights, Oakland. 

Neville. — Jack Neville has sent out cards for a dinner at which he will 
preside as host on the evening of Monday, July 4th, at the Claremont 
Country Club. The dinner is in compliment to Miss Harriet and 
Marian Stone. 

Stow. — Mr. Vanderlynn Stow was a guest of honor on June 22d at a fare- 
well dinner given by some of his fellow members of the Bohemian 
Club. Mr. and Mrs. Stow left for Boston, where they will meet their 
son, Ashfield Stow, who is a student at Harvard. Later they will 
sail for Europe. 

Simpkins. — Plarry Simpkins was host at a dinner on June 24th, at the 
Fairmont, at which he entertained Brigadier-General Edwards, Mrs, 
Edwards, Captain Miles Anderson, U. S. A., and Mrs. Anderson. 

Stanton. — A house warming and dinner was given by Mr. and Mrs. D. J 
Stanton on Tuesday evening at their newly-completed home on 
Palm avenue, in honor of their daughter. Miss Evelyn Stanton, 
whose marriage to Mr. Gould is to take place next week. In the 
evening a pleasant musical was enjoyed. The guests were Miss 
Evelyn Stanton, Miss Laura Ferguson, Miss Edna Terschurn, Mi.ss 
Carrie Gordon, Miss Hattie Ferguson, Mrs. V. E. Mathews, Mrs. 
S. P. Tuggle. Mrs. D. J. Stanton. Mr. H. F. Gould, Dr. E. Topham, 
Mr. R. C. Rolpe, Mr. W. C. Prichard, Mr. H. Gingg. Mr. V. E. Mat- 
thews, Dr. S. P. Tuggles, Mr. D. J. Stanton. 

Wood. — Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin Wood, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Dillingham, of Honolulu, entertained at dinner on Saturday evening, 
and later took their guests to the theatre. 

LUNCHEONS. 

Breeden. — Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden was hostess at an elaborate 
luncheon at the Francisca Club recently, the complimented guest be- 
ing Mrs. Emory Winship. 

Burton.— Dr. and Mrs. Richard Burton, of Minneapolis, entertained on 
Thursday, June 23d, at a luncheon at Cloyne Court, Berkeley, in 
honor of Percy Mackaye, the dramatist, and Mrs. Mackaye. 

Friedlander.— Mrs. T. Carey Friedlander was hostess at a luncheon on 
Monday at the Palace Hotel. 

Howell.— Mrs. Josiah Howell was hostess at a pretty luncheon on Wed- 
nesday at the Fairmont. 

Mattheis.— Mrs. Jack Mattheis gave a charming luncheon at her home. 
103 Congress street, last Tuesday, June 28th, in honor of Mrs. Oscar 
Brynn, of Los Angeles. The afternoon was spent in music and bridge. 

Martin.— Mrs. Eleanor Martin was hostess at the St. Francis on Tues- 
day at a luncheon in honor of Mr. and Mrs, William Burke (Ml 
Genevieve Walker.) 

Miller.— Miss Marian Miller was hostess at a luncheon and bridge on 
June 21st, at which she entertained a number of last winter's debu- 
tantes prior to her departure for a motor trip to the southern part 
of the State. 

PMIsbury.— Mrs. Horace D. Pillsbury was hostess at a luncheon at the 
Francesca Club on Wednesday, the complimented guest being Miss 
Mary Josselyn. 



Reid.— Miss Merritt Reid entertained at a luncheon on Friday, the com- 
plimented guests being the Misses Cunningham. 

Smith. — Mrs. Robert Hays Smith entertained at a luncheon on Wednesday 
at the Fairmont Hotel, in honor of Miss Evelyn Campbell, of Michi- 
gan. 

Tevis. — Dr. Harry Tevis entertained a.t an elaborate luncheon on Friday 
at the Fairmont in compliment to Mrs. J. P. Arnsden, of Versailles, 
Ky.. and Mr. and Mrs. W. M. M. Haupt, of New York, who are visit- 
ing in this city. 

Waterhouse. — Mrs. John Waterhouse. Jr., was the complimented guest 
at a luncheon on June 21st, at the Palace Hotel, which was given by 
her mother. Mrs. Wallace Alexander. Mrs. Waterhouse's home is in 
Honolulu, and during her stay in California she will be often enter- 
tained. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

Bowles. — Miss Amy Bowles will entertain a number of young people over 
the week-end at her home. Saturday night she will take her guests 
to the dance at the Claremont Country Club. 

Brewer. — The Misses Isabel, Elena and Marie Brewer entertained a 
merry house paity of young people in their bungalow in Mill Valley 
over the week-end. 

Hopkins. — Miss Florence Hopkins entertained a Jolly house party at her 
home at Menlo Park over the week-end, and they attended the in- 
formal dance at the Menlo Country Club Saturday evening. 

Josselyn. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Josselyn entertained several guests over 
the past week-end at their home near Woodside. 

Magee. — Mrs. Flora Dean Magee will entertain a house party at her 
ranch in Nevada over the Fourth of July. Miss Ethel Dean, her sif- 
ter, is now her guest. 

Morrison. — The Misses Morrison entertained at a house party at their 
home at San Jose over the week-end. 

Wheeler. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler will entertain a merry 
house party of young people over the Fourth ot July at their place 
on McCloud river. 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

Casserly. — Mrs. John D. Cosserly entertained a theatre party at th< pi r* 
formance of "Antigone" at the Greek Theatre on Thursday evening. 

Kerr. — Mrs. George Keir entertained at a theatre party on Saturday af- 
ternoon at Margaret Anglin's performance of "The Awakening of 
Helena Richie." Her guests of honor were Mrs. Harold Havens and 
Mrs. King. 

TEAS. 

Beardsley. — Mrs. George Beardsley was hostess at one "i the prettiest of 

the recent teas given at her home in San Rafael, Th< c pllmented 

guests were Mrs. Mary Jarboe and Mrs* Ralph Mart. 

Cunningham. — Mrs. James Cunningham entertained at an Informal tea on 
Friday in the Laurel Court at the Fairmont for a score of the younger 
girls. The hostess was assisted by her daughters, 

CARDS. 

Furnlval. — Mrs. Furnival, mother of Lieutenant Furnival of the Presidio, 
has sent out cards for an elaborate bridge party, at which she will be 
hostess in compliment to Mrs. A. X. Faulkner and Miss Marie Lun- 
deen on the afternoon of Tuesday, July 5th. 

Harber. — Mrs. Giles Harber entertained friends informally at bridge on 
board the California on June 20th. Mrs. Harber is occupying apart- 
ments at the Colonial, while Captain Harber Is on duty at Mare 
Island. 

Langhorne. — Miss Julia Langhorne was hostess at an Informal bridge 
party at her home in Pacific avenue on Thursday evening in honor 
of the Misses Cunningham. 

Miller. — Miss Marian Miller entertained a number of friends of the 
younger set at a bridge party and tea on Wednesday, June 22d. 

Young. — Major and Mrs. Haldimand Putnam Young entertained an even- 
ing bridge party recently at their home in Pacific avenue. The affair 
was in honor of Mrs. Emory Winship. 

MOTORING. 
Anderson.— Mrs. Alden Anderson and Miss Kathryn Anderson, with a 

party of friends, enjoyed a motor trip through Lake County last week. 
De Laveaga. — Mr. and Mis. de Laveaga motored on Saturday from their 

home at Menlo to Santa Cruz, where they spent the week-end at the 

seashore. 
Hatfield.— Sir Robert Hatfield, with Lady Hatfield and Mayor Walter, 

motored to the Vendorne for a few days' stay to visit Mt. Hamilton 

and other points of interest in Santa Clara Valley. 
Hatfield. — Sir Robert Hatfield and Lady Hatfield, who have been spending 

a month at Del Monte, have gone South on a motor trip before leav- 
ing for the East. 
Hopkins.— E. W. Hopkins, Miss Florcnee Hopkins and Samuel Hopkins 

motored to Del Monte to spend the week-end. 
King. — Mr. Frank B. King, with his sister, Miss King, and their guest, 

J. C. Quay, motored to the Vendorne from San Francisco tor the 

ride to Mount Hamilton. 
Morton. — Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Morton, with Mrs. A. M. Colman, motored 

down to the Vendorne from San Francisco t.. spend the week-end 

visiting their mother. Mrs, Lydia Morton, and their sister. Miss 
Carrie Morton. 



Beautiful Willow Plumes 

Made from old feathers and 
boas or new material furnished 

Phone West 221 1398 O'Farrell Street 

GUARANTEE— No Fibers can be Shaken from Plumes 1 Willow. 



July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



Moffitt.— Dr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Moffltt, accompanied by Miss \ 

Jolliffe, enjoyed a motor trip to Northern California. Klamath 
Springs was their destination. 

Miller. — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. O. Millei and \ilt i Vlarlon Mills ■ e 

ing a motor trip to the south ei n pi C thi 

Oyster. — Captain and Mrs. J. S. Oysfc 

ter and George Oyster. Jr., of Wn.sh in^j. ii m. i >. i,v. made I .-. 

last week that motored to Byron Springs, going from there to Del 

Monte. 
Tobin. — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sadoc Tobln. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas \i a ■:■■■ 

and Walter Hush made Up a party that motored to Santa Cruz for 

the week-end. 

PICNIC. 

McLaughlin. — Miss Isabelle McLaughlin gave a picnic on Sunday in San 
Mateo, which was much enjoyed. About twentj guests were invited, 
who ate their lunch under the trees. 

ARRIVALS. 

Burke. — Mr. and Mrs. William P. Burke (Miss Genevieve Walkei-) re- 
turned unexpectedly from Dublin, and have been at the Palace since 
their arrival. They left on Wednesday for their country home at 
Laurelwood, where they will remain most of the summer. 

Board man. — Mrs. George Boardman and Miss Dora Winn returned on 
Monday from a long sojourn abroad. Miss Winn will make her debut 
during the coming season. 

Brownell. — Mrs. Earl Brownell, who has been visiting in the East, re- 
turned to her Broadway home on Wednesday. June 21st. 

Bancroft. — Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bancroft have returned after a pleasant 
trip to Byron Springs. They were accompanied by Hubert Bancroft. 

Beaver. — Mrs. Frederick Beaver, Miss Isabel Beaver and their guest, Miss 
Ruth Casey, have returned from a visit to Aetna Springs. 

Crocker. — Henry Crocker, Jr., Patrick Calhoun, Jr., and Mayo Newhall 
arrived on Thursday from the East, where they have been attending 
school. 

Campbell, — Dr. and Mrs. Wallace Campbell, of San Jose, will be visitors 
in town next month, but will pass most of the time as the guest of 
Mrs. Phoebe Hearst at the country home of the latter near Pleas- 
anton. 

Champney. — Mrs. Elizabeth W. Champney, the well known writer on the 
chateaux and villas of France and Italy, is at Cloyne Court, accom- 
panied by her son, E. Frere Champney. 

Cook. — Dr. W .V. Cook, Mrs. Cook and Carson Cook of Pasadena are 
among the recent arrivals at Castle Crags. Mrs. John S. Merrill and 
her daughter from Menlo Park are summering at Castle Crag. Other 
recent arrivals include the Misses Dabney. of Oakland; Mrs. A. H. 
Hendry and two sons; Mrs. N. Y. Tiff ally, of Sausallto; Mr. and 
Mrs. Anson Herrick, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Anderson. 

Cowell. — Mrs. Earnest Cowell is again occupying her apartments at the 
Fairmont Hotel after a sojourn at her country home in the Santa 
Cruz Mountains. 

Deane. — Mrs. James R. Deane and Miss M. A. l >eane arrived Tuesday 
from Honolulu, where they spent a month most enjoyably. 

Dohrman. — Mrs. E. A. Dohrman, win l« i I" ■- n visiting her daughter, 
Mrs. Clarence Eddy, in New York, tor several months, will return to 
California In July. 

Felton. — Mrs. W. W. Felton is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Prentiss Cobb 
i [ale, b mi will remain Indefinitely. 

Hyde.— Miss Helen llyde, after n i' ■ years" nbsi-ncn In the Orient, re- 

tur i on Saturday Ias1 on the liner China. 

Irwin.— Miss Helen e Irwin has returned from B short visit it I EUlsborO, 

where she was the guest of Mrs. Mountford S. W\ 
McMillan. -Mrs. Robert McMillan, wlfl ol Captain McMillan U, S. a. 

who was Miss Leon tine Blakeman, arrived from FV>r1 Hamilton, N. 

7., on June 21st. Shi Is the guest ol hei parents ' ■ ■ ■ and Mrs. T 

z. Blakeman, at the KUlcrest. 
MacMonagle. — Douglas MacMonagl ned from his Bast n 

school and Joined his parenl Id rty MacMonaj 

their home In Bi 
McAllister. —Miss Ethel McAllister and hei brother, Otis 

from the Basl 
Miller.— Mr. and Mrs, Christian MJllei (MiM Bes l< Etl i "it are at their 

m w l ie in .San Rafael. Mrs, Miller Is charming Southern girl, 

who will ii. ;m addition t<> soclet) In San 
Martin.— Mrs. Walter Martin, who '< lutheru part of the 

State wnii the children during the earls pari ol the summer, is again 

.■ii Burllngame, Walter Martin is In Portland. 
Mansfeldt. — Mrs, Hugo Mansfeldt returned on June !4th from a trip of 

qi i Northern Africa, she had one of the most unique 

join [i ed by any of thi 

abroad, Mr. and Mrs. Mansfeldt left on Thursday for U 

home pa, where Mrs. Mansfeldl will res! and ret >ver from 

her long |ourne> 
Neibling. Mi r daughter, Mlsa 

Sundaj from Portlund. where they have been vlsil Nelbllng 

the motif of much gayety In thi ' A dlnm 

dance al the Portland Country Club was given in her 

week they were guests of ft 

in South, it 



Newhall.— Miss Virginia Newhall will arrl m ] loston ■ ■ 

she I .. or the past ■ i 

Spreckeis.— Mr. and Mrs. .lark Spret 

i i tusiness i rip to New ^ ork. 
Pease.— Mr. and Mrt Richard pi i and Mr. an rthui Watson 

have returned I a visit to Aetna, and art t theli Pi 

avenue home, 
Phelps.— Reai Admiral PhelpB, U. a. N. (retired) has retu I to his 

i in Berkelej from a visit with friends al Bremerton Navj STard 

Potter,— Mr. and Mrs, \iii-. Potter and Miss Nine Joins are at the Palace 

for a few days before proceeding to Santa Bi a 

DEPARTURES. 

Barron. — Mrs. Edward Barron and her daughters, Miss Margaret and Eve- 
lyn Barron, are at Del Monte, where they will remain over the 
Fourth of July holidays. 

Bourn.— Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Bourn left for the Gast and Europe on Mon- 
day. They will join Mr, and Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent (Miss Maud 
Bourn) in London, and later travel on the Continent. Much satisfac- 
tion is being expressed over the recent purchase by Mr. and Mrs. 
Bourn of the Burlinga residence of Prince Poniatowski. 

Bee.— Mrs. Louise Bee: has temporarily closed her apartments at the 
Lafayette, and is enjoying a change of climate at Skaggs Springs. 

Buck. — Major Carroll Buck and Mrs. Buck will leave early in July for 
a trip to the southern part of the State. Later in the month they 
are going to Lake Tahoe for a visit of indefinite duration. 

Crellin. — Mrs. Thomas Crellin and her daughter, Mrs. Robert Fitzgerald, 
are at Castle Crags for a stay of several weeks. 

Donohue. — Mrs. J. A. Donohue and Miss Katherine Donohue left Sunday 
for Yosemite. They will be joined shortly by Mr. Donohue, who is 
now in the East. The family is contemplating a trip to Yellowstone 
Park before returning. 

Dillingham. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dillingham were passengers on the 
Siberia, which sailed Tuesday. They were en route to their home 
in Honolulu. 

Gordon.— Mr. and Mrs. Mackenzie Gordon will leave this week for Wood- 
side, where they will spend the summer. 

Humphreys. — Mr. and Mrs. William Penn Humphreys have taken a bun- 
galow at Mission San Jose for the months of July and August. 

Holton.— Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Ilolton and Miss Willmot Holton are in the 
Yosemite, and are thoroughly enjoying their visit. 

Jones. — Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Jones are at Castle Crags, where they 
will remain about two weeks. 

Lukens. — Mr. and Mrs. Russell Lukens will visit Mrs. E. J. Lukens at 
her country home in Siskiyou during July. 

Langhorne. — Miss Julia Langhorne will leave in a few days for Santa 
Barbara, where she will be the guest of the Misses Newhall at the 
Potter. Later she will go to Colorado Springs, where she will visit 
her sister, Mrs. Richard Hammond. 

Lent. — Mrs. George II. Lent, accompanied by Miss Laura Bates, will 
leave next week for the Atlantic Coast. 

Lund. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lund, Jr., have gone to Santa Barbara for 
the months of July and August. 

Linforth. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter Linforth left on Sunday for Yosemite 
Valley, where th< ■ peel to remain a month. 

Martin. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin ac ompanled by her son, Peter Martin, 
left last week for Los Angeles on a business and pleasure trip. They 
will be extensively entertained during their sojourn there. It is 
possible thej may vlsil Coronado before their return, 

Mc Near. -Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear will Leave on July 7th for 
Santa Barbara, where they will s] I the summer. 

Ph later.— Colonel Matl PI rhlrtleth infantry, with Mrs. Phls- 

ter and his daughter, Miss Belle Phister, have gone to the Yosemite. 

Thi ) will Ml iru to the I'i- ni the summer. 

Russ. — Mrs. John EtUSB will leS H New York, and after a 

brief stay in the Eastern City, will sail for Europe early In July. 

Treanor. — Miss Edith Treanor Is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Covington 
at Menlo. 

Van Slcklen.— Mr. and Mis, Frederick Van Sirklcn and their daught< r, 
Miss Dorothy Van Slcklen, of Alameda, are rusticating at Lake Ta- 
hoe. They will remain until alter July 1th at the Tahoe Tavern. 

W hi ttler.— William F. Whlttier is month at the Bd 

Country Club. 

Zeile.— Mr. and Mrs. Fred Zetle and Miss Marlon Zelle, who make th< Ir 
home at the Fairmont, are going to Lake Tahoe In July, and will 
1 a month at the Tavern. 

INTIMATIONS. 

Aronson. — Mr. and Mrs. Philip N A ompanled by Mrs. Ralph 

Prager. of San Fr&nciKO, after touring Italy and Germany, are now 
at Bad Nauhelm. 

Atkinson.— Mrs % lira M Wadsworth, are 

at the Victoria Hotel. Amsterdam. They will go to Germany later, 
and will Witness the Passion I 

Brooke— General and Mrs, John H. Brook-'. 9. A., (retired), who are 
well known in San Francisco society, are in Paris, after a long so- 
journ in Germany. They Btfl of Embassador Bacon at 
lun My. 






Go to Headquarters 

BATHING SUITS 

Sweater Coats Summer Underwear 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 




Cor. Grant Ave. and Post Sts. 



TBa@ Moitt^gip Wkh €Mbw©mm 



By Habbiett Watson Capweix. 



What's the matter with clubwomen? 

I put the interrogation to a member of the California Club. 
She made me cross my heart that I would conceal her identity 
if she 'fessed up about her club-mates. So I'll just mention that 
she has held various positions in her club, and at one time had 
charge of the civic department. 'What's the matter with club- 
women? "They have growing pains, that's all," came the answer 
with conviction. 

"Growing pains." A neat diagnosis that, and one that even, 
a Christian Scientist couldn't refute. We've all had to bear with 
children afflicted with growing pains, and we know the symptoms 
at a glance. The disease has external manifestations indicated 
by a magnificent disdain for hanging together. The boy or 
girl with growing pains always seems about to part company 
with his or her clothes — a mute threat which, fortunately, is 
seldom carried out. Growing pains come in the gauche period, 
when the body seems but a by-product of the hands and feet. For- 
tunately foi the male species, his clothes are provided with capa- 
cious pockets into which he can jam his hands, and likewise he 
can purse i p his lips and whistle to draw attention from his feet. 
The female species afflicted with growing pains is deprived of 
pockets and forbidden to whistle. Thus she must navigate her 
creed of dissimulation early, with her hands and feet fully ex- 
posed, and yet convince the onlookers that she is less gawky than 
her brothers. 

The member of the California Club, having made the com- 
parison, should be permitted to show the merits of the simile. 
She went about the task with zest. "There are individual club- 
women who have passed the awkward age. Their ideals and ideas 
are not put on and taken off with every breeze that blows — they 
have poise, charm, gift. Mrs. J. W. Orr, who urged San Fran- . 
Cisco's claims for the general federation at the last national 
meeting, is a clubwoman who has found herself. She can be 
taken as a type of the clear-headed clubwoman who has a gift 
of prophecy, an understanding of the place and power clubs will 
have in the future. .Meanwhile she doesn't play ring-around- 
the-rosy with every new fad that comes along. Mrs. Max Sloss, 
Mrs. E. L. Baldwin, Mrs. James E. Crawford and many more 
women in the club have likewise erect and full-grown ideas about 
club work and its application. But we are not arguing about in- 
dividuals. The California Club, like every other club in San 
Francisco, is still in the awkward age. 
© © © 
"Individuals may no longer have growing pains, but the 
clubs as a composite are in that period. How could it be other- 
wise when one considers the way clubs have grown the last few 
years? Not much more than a decade ago, clubwomen were 
in the nursery playing with reading blocks. They were poorly 
organized, and committed to 'literary' exercises. Since then, 
they have grown faster than Fate can let down the hems of 
their skirts. They have abandoned open-mesh linen organiza- 
tion and stepped into strong, closely woven Jersey silks. With 
the change has come power and opportunity to expand with the 
circumference of human endeavor instead of May-daying in the 
sun with the poets and novelists. The expansion is" not in the 
large, even, flowing way set down in Greek art. It is jerky; it 
doubles up on itself; clubwomen seem to be running from one 
unfinished task to another; they try to settle all the problems 
of the world at once instead of finishing up one job at a time. 
But that's a very natural state of affairs considering their sud- 
den emancipation from abstractions, and the way they have been 
shooting ahead since the reform. After a bit the growing pains 
will abate, and the clubs will slough off the awkward a°e ami 
enter a period of well-poised progression." 
© © © 
"What's the matter with clubwomen?" I asked a member of 
the Sorosis. "They have been drugged bv flattery," she quickly 
answered. _ "Their faculties have been sugar-coated and then- 
efficiency is not starched and crisp in consequence. To the con- 
trary, they are floundering around in a quagmire of compliments 
Let me illustrate: Not long ago a Professor from Stanford Uni- 
versity addressed us on the British poets of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. He devoted the first half of his lecture felicitating him- 
self upon having so responsive, so intelligent an audience°to ad- 
dress; leaped from peak to peak of encomiums on modern woman 
—and on the highest peak planted the flag of the clubwoman 
Ihere were a few women who would have liked to say f oh slush I' 



out of the corners of their mouths, but the rest opened them 
wide and drank deeply. It was like giving sugar water to a 
baby. 

"Why should the Professor have wasted his time and ours. 
Addressing an audience of men, he would not thus pilfer time 
from the subject-matter to wade around in flattery. He would 
have stuck to the poets of the nineteenth century. Lecturers al- 
ways seem to feel called upon to re-assure women about their 
intelligence. And surely intelligence never came to beings who 
expect it less, judging from the way women take to this reassur- 
ance. They evidently do not appreciate how insulting it is. in- 
constant patting on the head. It is about time clubwomen re- 
buked the lecturer who hands out this sugar drip. Sorosis is not" 
a reform club — we go in for arts and letters, and let others take 
care of civic righteousness. Nine distinguished men out of ten 
who have lectured for us waste half their lime telling us how 
clever we are. 

"It is no better in the halls of civic righteousness. I have 
attended meetings of clubs that go in for that sort of thing, 
and the occasion of my attendance is usually an address by some 
prominent man. I should think these women would get tired of 
hearing about their 'intelligent faces,' 'moral worth' and "ability 
to do' the public things the men have for some years now been 
voting not to let them do. Women are just beginning to awaken 
to this incongruous flattery. When they are wide awake they 
will yawn through all the sugary part of the lecture, and seeing 
them yawn, the lecturer will realize that the awakening has come, 
that clubwomen no longer tolerate shower upon shower of com- 
pliments. 



San Francisco, Cal., July 1st, 1910 

ON JULY 15th ALTMANS WILL BE TAKEN OVER BY 
A NEW FIRM-AND ON 

July 5th 

We will start a 

Final 10 Days' Sale 

■When every garment remaining 

MUST BE SOLD 

The reducttions are extreme and 
you may come expecting unheard 
of bargains. Respectfully 




/S*<VBt>OI>ATrD 



139-141 GEARY ST., Bet. Grant Ave. and Stockton St. 



Miss Harker's School, 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and AMlls. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Beift 



Alice BeA 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 



.Iuly 2. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



if the other day whether the w m's clubs 

are goin^r to Buppori Thomas E. Hiayden if he runs for Con- 
gress. Mr. IIm\ li upported the clubwomen in the belief 
that their 'intelligence/ 'ahilitj to do,' etc., is worth] of special 
comment. He is iden ified with many interests toward which 
chilis have thrown their unit. 'J strength, and 1"' has a large I 'in 

inine constituency. The ladies interested in raising the tuber- 
culosis Eund selei ted Mr. Hayd n to thank Man. I Allen when i 

danced for the benefil of that society. That is the only i i i 

ever heard Mr. Eayden refrain from reassuring the feminine so.n 
about its intelligence. He confined himself to Miss Allen, and 
reassured her about the morals of her dancing. 1 cannot say 
thnt the chilis arc going to endorse Mr. Hayden. I. for one, would 
rote to hold him up as an awful example to his fellows. I should 
make him scissor all the felicitations out of his addresses to 
women's clubs before I endorsed him." 



"What's the mailer with clubwomen?" I asked the member 
of the Century Club. She, too, had an answer ready. "They 
encourage pseudo intellectuals. A club is a veritable hot-bed for 
the charlatan germ. To be sure, the standard of knowledge dis- 
seminated at clubs has steadily improved, but it needs to be 
roughly jerked up a few notches. Clubwomen are too prone io 
acquire their knowledge by the painless method. They do not, 
as a rule, prod down to the very marrow of the facts; they skim 
lightly, sometimes gracefully, over a subject, and just as often 
they waddle awkwardly over the rough places. 

"An instance comes to my mind now. A clubwoman read a 
paper on a subject which touched biology at some points. She 
rambled on in discursive uncertainties, and then made a dozen 
succinct statements startlingly out of joint with the scientific 
facts. Dr. Martin and half a dozen others gasped, but the rest 
of the audience wore the same 'My — isn't — this — a — deep — and 
■ — intellectual — paper," and maintained that same deferential ex- 
pression to the end. Now, if a woman finds that her subject is 
taking her out into deep waters she should watch her stroke. But 
clubwomen will get up a paper in a few airy moments snatched 
from other duties and diversions, whereas the subject could not. 
be handled by a trained investigator in the same time. 

"It is not to be expected that all clubwomen are deep-sea 
thinkera. There are many charming creatures who live in the 
shallows. My quarrel is that in club life the shallow ones are 
permitted and encouraged to poses deep-sea thinkers, [n giving 
out topics, there is too little deference for subjects thai need 
special study and investigation, A woman who docs not know 
in what ward she lives will cheerfully agree to write "n tainted 
municipal politics; a woman who has never from choici read 

poetry, will blithely crib from a few reference I ks an i 

Matthew Arnold's 'Touchstone Method;' a woman who has 

never Been nor yel studied anj other school system, will writ i 

the 'Superlat ive \ alue of I he Lmei i 

"This laxity develops half-baked women. Tin standard should 
be raised. Even i tub a to hold in 

check the pseudo intellectuals. Members should bo 
mined to handle subjects beyond tl it reach, [f a woman knows 
how to hake a blackberry pie better than anything el 

id message instead of B which she 

I- M. i w 3 nothing." 

This ders, and take your choice, Wnafs thi 

with clubwomen ins? Druj 

are they pseudo-intellectus 



OBITUARY 



\ - i to the business and newspaper wot: 

well as 

AJamei I inlay, « ho for years has 

prominent writer for the n financial and comi 

-. For a long time Mr. Pinky was as d with the 

stair of the N< « - i. 

ids upon financial conditions were notable. Be w 
genial, lovable nature, . and many ar 

mourn him. He 

California at an The funeral took pi 

from h 

vate. Mr. Finlai 

laughters, Mrs. l.ulu .lam- \. Y. Judson at 

William Kingwo 



IJniiiiie 

:i 




Strong winds blow- 
ing in their favor 



CAMBRIDGE 2Sr 

in boxes of (en £«*Jt, 

AMBASSADOR -3C 

ihe after-dinner size sW*' 

The Little Brown Box " 



Philip Morris 

Cigarettes 



For Dandruff and all Scalp Diseases 
HI A. F. COSGROVE 

SPECIALIST 

Diseases of the Hair and Scalp, at 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

239 POWELL STREET 




H. BETTE 



Ladies Tailor 



and 



Habit Maker 



IMPORTER OF FINE NOVELTIES 

Fall Importations and styles just received. 
270 SUTTER STREET Opposite White House 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO. CALA. 

Elesant new fire-proof construction. Service as perfect i 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



S®d®B sumdl IP©rs®ifiiffll M®m§ 

Continued from Page 17) 

Boyd. — Mr. and Mrs. John Boyd and Miss Louise Boyd, who have been 
abroad for several months, are expected to arrive in San Francisco 
early in July. They were met in Paris by Mr. and -Mrs. Aimer New- 
hall, and the party spent several weeks together. 
Bates. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Seaiies Bates with their children are spend- 
ing the summer at Blithedale. 

Bull. — Miss Edith Bull ana Miss Elizabeth Bull are having an enjoyable 
visit at the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. 

Beylard. — Miss Sophie Beylard, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Duplessls 
Beylard, is convalescing from tne effects of a recent operation for ap- 
pendicitis. 

Crocker. — Templeton Crocker, owner of the St. Francis Hotel of San 
Francisco, and one of the holders of the Crocker millions, will arrive 
at the Hotel Potter Friday for an extended stay. In his party are 
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Irwin and Miss Helene Irwin, formerly of Hono- 
lulu, but now of San Francisco. Miss Irwin, who is reputed to be the 
richest girl in the world to-day, having untold millions in her own 
name, is the fiancee of Mr. Crocker. 

Currier. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker' Currier are at present in Honolulu. 
They will sail for San Francisco in the first week of July, and will be 
at the Fairmont. 

Conr.ell. — Miss Eleanor Connell is at present at Oberammergau, where 

she is living at the home of Anton Lang, the singer, taking the part 

of Christus. After witnessing the Passion Play, Miss Connell will 

go directly to Paris, and then to Italy. She expects to return to 

San Francisco in September. 

Crocker. — Miss Jennie Crocker is expected from New York in a few days; 
She has been the guest of her aunt, Mrs. Charles B. Alexander, for 
the past two months. 

Eddy. — Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Eddy recently gave a musicale at their home 
in Paris, which was attended by several Californians now In the 
French capital. The Eddys have just concluded an enjoyable motor 
trip through Germany. 

Fabian. — Mr. S. M. Fabian (pianist) a native of California, will be here 
next month on a visit to his old home, after an absence of twenty 
years in the East. 

Foreman. — Miss Sands Foreman, who has been a recent guest of Mrs. 
John t>. Spreckels, Jr.. is now visiting Mrs. Alexander Hamilton at 
Burlingame. 

Grant. — Mr. and Mrs. loseph D. Grant are enjoying a trip in the Austrian 
Tyrol, after having spent several months of pleasant travel in Eng- 
land. 

Josselyn. — Miss Myra Josselyn will go to Keswick in July to visit Miss 
Dorothy Baker at the. Baker ranch, where they have established an 
ideal camp. 

Jolliffe. — Miss Gertrude Jolliffe is with a party of friends in London, 
where they are domiciled at the Carleton. 

Keeney. — Mrs. Charles Keeney and her daughter, Miss Innes Keeney, 
have crossed from London to Paris in order to join their many San 
Francisco friends in celebrating the Fourth of July. 

Leib. — Judge and Mrs. Leib are entertaining Judge and Mrs. Hughes of 
San Antonio, Texas, at their home, "Leibheim," at San Jose. 

McCusher. — The Misses Helen and Evelyn McCusher of Portland, Ore., 
are spending their vacation with their aunt. Mrs. John Francis Mc- 
Geough, at her summer home in Menlo Park. 

Mills. — Ogden Mills has joined Mrs. Mills and their daughter, Countess 
Granard, in Paris. He will return to America in the fall, and will 
be in California again during the early winter. 

Martin. — Mr. and Mrs. Peter Martin are planning a visit to Newport in 
August. Mrs. Martin's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Oelrichs. have 
taken the Sargent cottage there for the season. 

McDonald. — Mr. and Mrs. Allan MacDonald (Suzanne Kirkpatrick) and 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth MacDonald (Anita Davis) are occupying the 
Davis country home at Ross for the summer. 

McCalla. — Mrs. Bowman McCalla, of Santa Barbara, and her daughter, 
Miss Lillian McCalla, are in New York City, and during their stay 
there, are at the Martha Washington. 

Poor. — Mrs. Charles Poor, of Washington, D. C. and her daughter. Mrs. 
Roscoe Bulmer, wife of Lieutenant-Commander Bulmer, U. S. N., 
will be in San Francisco several weeks during July. 

Sharon. — Mrs. Frederick Sharon, who has been seriously ill in Paris, is 
rapidly recovering. She and Mr. Sharon have abandoned their plans 
for a trip to California this summer, and will remain abroad. 

Spreckels. — Mr. :ind Mrs. A. B. Spreckels are spending part of the summei 
at their farm in Napa Valley. 

Talbot.— Mr. and Mrs. Earle Talbot have written interesting letters of 
their life in Corea, where, for the last year, they have made their 
home. They expect to return to Ameriea by way of India and Suez 
sometime during the coming year. 

Whiteside.— Mr. and Mrs. Norman N. Whiteside have taken an apartment 
at the Keystone, corner of Washington and Hyde streets. 



CANDY FOR THE FOURTH. 
To take with you on your Fourth of July outing: Appropriatelv decod 
rated boxes filled with candies. At all four of George Haas & Sons' candy 
stores: Phelan Building; Fillmore at Ellis; Van Ness at Sutter; and 28 
Market street, near Ferry. 



When the best argument our contempo- 
raries can make for their oil, is that 

"It is the same as MONOGRAM." 
"Looks just like MONOGRAM." 

"Why not use that standard of excellence? 

MONOGRAM OILS 

Ask for it. See that you get it. 

NEW YORK LUBRICATING OIL CO. 

GEORGE P. MOORE, Pacific Coasl Manager 
586 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1910, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) pur cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Friday, July 1. 1910. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from 
July 1, 1910. H. C. lvl,EVESA.HT., r-wlii.r 

Offlce-7s:: Market street, San Francisco, ~ 1 , ' ,slllt| - 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society (The German Bank.) 

Membft- of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, laiO, a dividend has been declared at 

the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Friday. July 1, 1910. Dividends not called for are 

added to the deposit account and earn dividends from July 1, 1910. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager. 
Office — 526 California street; Mission branch — 2572 Mission street, near 
Twenty-second; Richmond District branch — 432 Clement street, between 
Fifth and Sixth avenues. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French -American Bank of Savings. 

(Savings Department), Formerly French Savings Bank.) 

For the half year ending June 30, 1910. a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Friday, July 1. 1910. Dividends not called for are 

added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 

1. 1910. 

A. LEGALLET, President 
Office— 108 Sutter St., San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings Union Bank of San Francisco, 
(Whose name was San Francisco Savings Union) 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1910, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four 14) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Friday, July 1. 1910. A dividend not drawn will 
be added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, and earn divi- 
dend from July 1st. Money deposited between June 15th and Monday,, 
July 11th, both days inclusive, commence to earn interest from July 1st. 
Office — N. W. Cor. California and Montgomery. 

R. M. WELCH. Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending June 30, L910, dividends upon all depots at 
the rate of four ill per cenl per annum, free of taxes, will bo payable 
on and after July 1. 1910. FRED W. RAY, Secretary. 

Office — 316 Montgomery Street, San Fran< 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Savings and Loan Society. 

(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For the half year ending Juno 30, 1910, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four Mi per rent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes. 

payable on and after Friday, July 1, 1910. 

Dividends not drawn become part of deposit accounts and earn divi- 
dends from July 1st. Money deposited on or before July 11th will earn 
interest from July 1st. WM, A. BOSTON, Cashier. 

Office — 101 Montgomery St, corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hlbernia Savings and Loan Society. 
At a meeting' of the Board ot f>irect<>i-s of n.is society, hold this day. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and three-fourths (8%) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30, 
linn, frro horn all t;.\. >. ami payable on and after July l. L910. Dividends 
not drawn will he added to depositors' accounts and become a part there- 
of, ami will earn dividend from July 1. 1!H0. I '■ -posits made on or before 
July 11. 1910, will draw Interest from July l. 1910. 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Cormr Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 
June 27, 1910. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 
A dividend has been declared for the six months ending June 30. 1910, 
of G per cent per annum o M time deposit money ami i per cenl i" r annum 
on < nil money. 

EDWARD SWEENY, Fre&ident; WM. CORB1N. Secretary, 
Office — Junction Golden Gate Ave., Market and Taylor Streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Italian-American Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1910, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four iii per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after ■ Friday. July 1. 1910. A dividend DOt drawn will !>■■ 

added to the deposit account become a part thereof, and earn dividend 

from July l. Money di posited between .1 L5th and Monday, July nth. 

both days Inclusive, commences to earn interest from July 1st 

A. SBARBORO. President; A. B. SBARBORO iilcr. 

Office— S, IS, Cor, Montgomery and Sacramento streets. 



• T|IY 3 - 191 °- and California Advertiser 21 



PARAFFIN OIL 

Important Discovery of High Grade Refining Oil of Paraffin Base, Forty Miles South of San Francisco 

This discovers la of tre ndoua significance to the oil Interests nl the State. California, world renowned as a producer of fuel oil, 

is now to the front with the discovery of phenomenally high-grade refining oil of paraffin base. 

PERSONALLY INVESTIGATE THIS 

We cordially Invite oil men and investors to our camp to fully investigate. It Is a revelation to oil men— a liberal education to the 
inexperienced — to see the enormous outcropping sand ledges, oil springs of 35 gravity oi", and the tanks of high grade oil of 45 to VI 
gravity and of PAHAFFIN BASE as certified to by the best chemists of the Pacific Coast. The oil has never sold at the wells at less 
than $1.50 pel- barrel, and now refiners offer $2.70 per barrel. 

Our company has large acreage, low royalty leases, four drilling rigs, about 15,000 feet of casing, tanks, oil and water lines, 
machine shop, electric light plant — in fact, a complete, up-to-date equipment. Ample treasury stock reserve with cash in hand to 
finish present well. 

The present well was started with 16-inch pipe so that great depth could be acquired if necessary to penetrate the lower sands. Ex- 
perts predict a big production and flowing wells. Ralph Arnold, the noted Government Geologist, surveyed the territory and reported 
the sandstone of great thickness and the formation practically undisturbed for 5,000 feet at the point where our company is now 
drilling with day and night shifts under the supervision of H. W. Parr, one of the best oil men of California. The property is 
proven by the wells already drilled. Reports of chemists and refiners and experts are to the effect that there is no better oil pro- 
duced. The management of the company is capable, trustworthy and dependable. They pioneered the field, they took the risks, they 
proved the field as oil-bearing and the buyers of our stock may feel assured of the safety of their investment and the certainty of 
profits. 

PARAFFIN On, IN NEVADA 

The Western Pacific Railway, in drilling- a water well at Sulphur in the Black Rock Desert in Humboldt County, Nevada, sixty 
miles west of Winnemucca, accidentally discovered oil. The fact became quickly known, people rushed in, and land has been located 
for thirty or forty miles. Many prominent California people have lands in this new field. Much excitement resulted when the drill 
passed through five feet of waxy formation. Chemical tests proved it to he paraffin wax, chemically known as ceresin. The claj 
formation is permeated with flecks of white paraffin. Oil was struck in two lower strata. 

This high-grade paraffin oil appears to be a natural lubricating oil. It is a source of surprise and wonder to oil men. The out- 
eroppings of the field show sand, shale and paraffin formation. 

The HIGH GRAVITY UNITED OIL COMPANY, having the distinction of producing the highest grade refining oil of the State, if 
not of the world, In its wells forty miles south of San Francisco, made a thorough examination of the Sulphur field and closed the 
biggest deal that has yet been made at Sulphur and now has a well there 550 feet deep, which will be drilled as a deep test well of 
the field. 

The HIGH GRAVITY UNITED OIL COMPANY will follow its policy of development and production, growth and expansion, by 
acquiring and operating SEVERAL properties for and on behalf of ONE company. As one property is placed on a paying basis, It is 
our intent and purpose to acquire new properties to prove and develop. With foui producing wells and drilling operations going for- 
ward day and night on our California property, and with the development of our Nevada property, it is safe to assume that within 
a short time this company will be on a dividend paying basis, 

The successful development of an oil field it Sulphur, Nevada, will revolutionize the commercial conditions of that great mineral 

State, just as the discovery of oil has done tor Cal la, and will open scores of new industries, giving employment to thousands 

of people an.' permitting the reduction ot low-grade ore thai cannot now be handled. The discovery of oil In common lal quantities 
by the HIGH gravity UNITED OIL COMPANY on Its largi Nevada holdings ot upwards of 2,000 acres will add millions ot dollars 

to its already large assets, and wll It mand for the shares at high prices, rivaling in value the stock of any Nevada mining 

company of to-day. 

STOCK OF MERIT AT ATTRACTIVE PRICE 

To carry forward active operations with the big equipment ol npany, SHARES ARE OFFERED AT THE BX- 

TREMELY LOW PRICE OF SS CENTS PER SHARE » ida people are making rapid subscription to this stock. V 

will be subscribed In a vei snort time, and it will not be necessary to repeat this announcement In fact. It Is mentioned 

for the purpose of acquainting tin I CHe x lw« >" " ' with the fact of the discovery of oil In I in tor the purpo 

of the sale of the stock, n e the future it will be at a much higher price. 

POLICY OF COMPANY 

The policy of our company is growth and expansion, the development of various promising properties und 
ment This plan otters the greatest possible protection to the buyers of pur slock. The buyers of our shares have a full in 
Is r,n the properties being di veloped by this company. The fact that we produce a paraffin oil can cent of the lighter reta- 
ins fractions tl; 16 per cent being a M gravil tplali riiy refiners offer as high as **.70 per barrel for 

the oil. From this you will realize this company's great future possibilities. 

w, „,l you every opportunity for Investigation and solicit your interest and your subscription to 

As long as ti,.- pn » nl allotment lasts it will be sold a< 86 CEN rs PER SHARE, it Is worth much more, as the proi Is and 

development have cost over I I It is now a safe i I 

Remit in any convenient form; ot if ok will be sent with draft attached. Investigate and you will Invest, and if you 

invest we believe you will roalln than on any oil investment you have ever made. 

High Gravity United Oil Co., IZ F^c^°Qdifo™fa 



HIGH GRAVITY UNITED OIL CO.. 337 MONAONOCK BLDG.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
Please send me information in reference to the above properties. 

Name 

Address cit * 

State 






22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 




Oil Fields or 
California. 



Though every now and then excel- 
lent tidings come from the gold 
mines of California, such as the new? 
of the great strike in the sensa- 
tional Tightner property and the offer of $2,500,000 fiat for the 
mine, public interest continues to center on the oil fields of the 
State. The development of proved territory and the exploration 
of areas which show signs enough to encourage the prospectors,, 
go forward on such a scale as to indicate an expansion of the 
industry away beyond the predictions <>f the most sanguine fore- 
casters. The talk of a dull market for the California product 
turns out to have been without foundation. On the contrary, the 
diminishing output of the oil measures in other parts of the 
DTnited Slates and the extension of the use of this fuel arc 
strengthening the demand and keeping up the price, <\cn in ihe 
face of enormous increase of production. 

The wells of the Middle. West arc rapidly going dry. This fact 
resells doubly to the advantage of California, because it turns a 
large volume of investment money our way. and also stiffens 
the demand for our oil. Unquestionably there will come into 
California during the next ten years many oil men from oilier 
and exhausted fields. They will bring many millions of monejs 
and with it experience gained in the business elsewhere that will 
materially help in the development of our known oil measures 
and in the opening up of new territory. Comparatively speak- 
ing, the drills have found as yet only a trifling fraction of the 
greasy treasure deep hidden under the hills and plains of the 
State. The hundreds of millions of dollars already added to 
the wealth of California and the country by our oil wells arc but 
a traction of the riches to come from the same source. 

In addition to settling the fuel question as far as the Pacific 
Coast is concerned, the remarkable oil fields of this State are 
giving, and will long continue to give us, wealth as great as has 
come from our mines or from our farms and orchards. The oil 
era, just beginning, promises to overtop in richness I In bonanza 
time of the seventies. It is a surer prosperity and more sound) 
and it will last a great deal longer. The world must have fuel 
and od, of all fuels, is the cheapest and most economical. I ali- 
fornia oil ranks above the product of any other field, and nobody, 
no matter how expert, may say how many billions of barrels lie 
in the golden sands awaiting the drills. In many parts of the 
State that have not yielded a gallon of oil are signs and indica- 
tions quite as encouraging as those which led to the discover} of 
the territories now producing millions of dollars worth of petro- 
leum every month. It is possible, even probable, that the most 
sensational strikes are yet to be made, and that all estimab - if 
the production of the next few years will be proved by events to 
have been absurdly small. The oil millionaires of California 
will shortly outnumber the fortunate ones who have found wealth 
in the other industries of the State, and will outrank them in 
riches. 



Negotiations now pending between 
A Matter of the Hay Cities Water Company, of 

Simple Equity. Alameda County and the municipal 

authorities of that county, suggest 
a few remarks concerning the matter of public utilities generally, 
a city water supply being especially illustrative of the conditions. 
Assume that a city has made an agreement with some corpora- 
tion by which the latter invests some millions of dollars in the 
installation of a water supply. For some years the corporation, 



or company, fulfills its contract, establishing a costly distribut- 
ing system, providing an ample water supply and giving general 
satisfaction. After some years of this, some one, or some faction 
or some interest, conceives the idea that the water may be better, 
that in some other place than that used by the company a better 
source of water supply may be found. Assume, solely for the 
present, that this idea may have some foundation in fact. What 
is to be done? 

The professional r -orporation-baiter, the cheap demagogue, the 
political aspirant, will shout loudly for the installation of a 
municipal water system. Neither be nor the great majority of 
his Listeners has any idea of the situation. The installation of 
a municipal water supply means the violation of a contract made, 
not with a coterie of grasping capitalists, as the great bulk of 
the populace generally imagines, but with a large number of 
small stockholders in a company that, trusting upon the good 
faith of the city authorities, invited investment from all cl 
the widow, the aged, and the thrifty wage-earner generally. Mil- 
lions of dollars, largely collected from these sources, have beeu 
invested in the elaborate distributing system of the water com- 
pany. Is it right that the county, under the goad of the agita- 

liould abrogate its treaty with these investors and 
comparatively valueless their greal property? 

What if the water supply i c lacking in either quantity or sup- 
ply? If another source of supply is desired, by all means ci it. 
but deliver it. at the county line, into the distributing system 
of the company, which has for years faithfully fulfilled its part 
of the contract. The distributing system is there: why uol usi 
it, am!, especially, why nol perform an acl of obvious equity? 

Indeed, any other course is preposterous. The abandonment 
of an existing distributing system means the tearing up of 
streets, the maintenance of chaotic conditions and the expendi- 
ture ni vast sums of the taxpayers' monej 

Common sense, equity and the slightest consideration of the 

interests of multitudes of stockholder-, small and large who have 
invested perhaps their all in a vital public utility, demand that 
existing water distributing system- should be utilized, even if 
a new water supply be determined upon. 



Private Wire-New York, Chicago 


Western Union Code 


J. 


c. 


WILSON 


Member 


New York Stock Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bond Exchange. S. F. - 


Main Office 




Branch Offices 


MILLS BUILDING 




— 


Sin Francisco 




PALACE HOTEL 


— 




(Main Corridor) San Francisco 


Correspondents 




HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 


HARRIS, WINTHROP & CO. 


Los Angeles. Cal. 


New York. Chicago, London 


andP 


ris 



MORE THAN 



5% 



The increased cost of living 1 has made it necessary for 
the investor to seek a larger return on his money 
To meet this demand we have a carefully prepared 
list of bonds yielding a hiph rate and affording: perfect 
SAFETY OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST 
Write for our Circular 
SUTRO & CO., 412 Montgomery St, San Francisco 



THE OIL BOOK An Authority on California Oil 

A Weekly Publication Devoted to the Oil Industry 
Mailed free upon request. 

LINCOLN MORTGAGE AND LOAN COMPANY 

14th and 15 th Floors 166 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
New York Sealilr Los Aogeles 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



New Steamers tor 

I'll I PACIFIC. 



By Ear the raosl notable commi 
even! of the week was the annoum i 
ment, following the return from the 
East oi General Manager R, P. 
Schwerin, thai the Pacific Mail Steamship Company will add to 
iis fleet two magnificent new steamers, to be used in the trans- 
Pacific service of the company: vessels thai will vie in size and 
splendor with the two famous Cunarders, Lusitania and Mauri- 
tania, and the great George Washington, of the North Ger 

Lloyd Company. This announcement comes at a mosl opportune 
time, being an effective silencer of the critics who have been 
howling (heir heads off over an alleged disinclination of the 
Pacific Mail Company to better its service. 

By adding these two vessels to its fleet, the company is doing 
far more than bettering its service. It is undertaking, by this 
means, to combat the efforts of the Japanese to control (lie com- 
merce of the Pacific Ocean. These two new steamers will lie Ear 
ami away the finest in the Pacific, and will be the attractions 
(hat will bring to this port and take to and from the Orient a 
great part of the choicest passenger and freight business thai 
now goes to Japanese, British and our own Puget, Sound trans- 
Pacific lines. Furthermore, it. is convincing evidence of the 
faith that the far-seeing Pacific Mail directors have in the future 
of San Francisco and its trade with the Far East. 

The new vessels, which are to cost $3,000,000 each, will be 
(i."ii i feet long, with a beam of TO feet and a mean draft of 33 
feet 6 inches. They will displace 38,000 tons, or nearly twice as 
much as a modern Dreadnaught. They will each carry 500 first 
cabin, 150 second cabin, and 700 steerage passengers. Their 
staterooms and cabins generally will be fitted and furnished with 
every luxury, making them, indeed, palatial floating hotels. 

To Mr. Schwerin is due the highest praise for tin- efforts he 
has made to bring about this addition to the commerce of San 
Francisco and the Pacific Ocean, and the highest congratulations 
for his success. 



Dull Season on 
the Stock Exchange. 



ill he 



The dull season on (he slock mar- 
kets has arrived, and unless some- 
thing unexpected happens il is not 
any sensational developments in the 



likely that there wi 
near future. 

The settlement of the railroad rate controversy had a steadying 
effect on railroad stocks, and an evidence of the workings of the 
new law was found in the result of the announcement last week 
of a raise in freight rates by the New York Centra] Road, to be 
effective August 1st. This raise will, of course) have t" be ap- 
proved by the Interstate Commerce Commission, but il is under- 
stood thai shippers and (he railroad people reached an agreement 
before the announcement was made, and no appreciable objection 
iii the raise is expected. The incident served to give strength to 
railroad stocks. Copper, notabl] Ugamated, has shown 8 
after a slight decline. 



Reports of the shipments by 
Salmon Shipments. salmon from San Francisco -how a 

marked increase over • orresponding 
periods of last year. During Maj ■'( 1909 ami 1910, the ship- 
ments were 5,306 and 6,193 cases respectively. 11 it 
to note thai of the various countries taking (his valuable Cali- 
fornia product, Chile led with 1,900 cases, followed by Argentina 
with 1,150. The next tomers were the Philip 

the East Indies, china, and Samoa, and then do line in 

decreasing quantities. South Vraerica maj be made the 
our foreign markets for nearly all of our products, if our mer- 
chants would only bestir themselves towards ic development 

with half (lie energy that h rized (he English and (ba- 

nian merchants, who now outdo us right at our doors, i: 
South and Central \meriea. The Bureau of American Repub- 
! work toward showing the possibilities of the 

■South and Central American marke -. but it is doubtful if many 

of our manufacturers and producers read the reports of that 
bureau or pay much attention to its work or Y. : 

complaints are made of poor business. Our local Men bants' 
li.m is awakening to a realization of the fact that we 
must be up and doing if we do tiot want our foreign rivals to 
rather in the markets that are rightfully 



Mrs. Gossip— They do say thai 
motor ataxia. Mrs. Parvenue I don't think much of 

lieap cars ; my husband has an imported 8mai ; 



For Centuries 

Known as Chartreuse 
LIQUEUR 

PERES 
CHARTREUX 

—GREEN AND YELLOW— 



THE GRAND 

FINALE TO 

THE WORLD'S 

BEST DINNERS 



At first-class Wine Merchants, 

Grocers, Hotels. Cafes, 

Batjer & Co., 

46 Broadway, New York. N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 




. ixiqujeur 




Ton speed limits in this town? Count 

Nope, you can't get out of here any too soon to please us. 



Big Panoche 

Oil Stock now selling 
at 

15c. Per Share 



Now is the time to buy before 
the next raise. Big Panoche 
Oil Company. 410 MuTs Dldg., 
San Francisco. Phone Kearny 
4585 Home C 1695 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jura ■>. 1910. 




WKMMLl 



/i^rtsfl^-j-rfaa^ 



13 



By L. J. Pinkson. 

New automobile owners of San Francisco and vicinity for Hie. 
week ending June "25, 1010: 

DAVIS. W. S.. 3 Presidio Terrace, San Francisco White 

RICHARDSON, W. H„ Gen. Hospital, Presidio Mitchell 

HINTON, J, M., care 545 Mission St., San Francisco Ford 

BATEMAN, W. F., 1577 Lincoln Ave., Alameda E. M. F. 

FOORMAN. Mrs. I. S„ 10 San Mateo Ave.. San Mateo Detroit 

HOADLEY, G. O.. 118 Commonwealth Ave.. San Francisco Oakland 

R1DEOUT. MRS. CORINNE Hotel Stewart. S. F Stevens- Duryea 

KING. HOMER S., 1S98 Broadway, San Francisco Llco 

DRENSIK. O. B.. 125!) Fifth Ave., Sunset Dist., San Francisco. .Overland 

COMYN. MRS, W. L., San Rafael Haynes 

MOl'LTHEAP, MRS. A. C, 1536 Ninth St., Alameda Haynes 

NAYLOR, A. \Y.. 2200 Durant St., Berkeley Columbus 

McCREADY. E. H.. 22S Ney St,, San Francisco Ramble* 

WELLS-FARGO NAT. BANK, San Francisco Locomobile; 

LYONS, W., Menlo Park Buick 

DODGE, G. S., 2001 Alameda Ave.. Alameda Locomobile 

NAYLOR. F. L., 2200 Durant St.. Berkeley Ford 

HDND. DR. F. J„ Ross, Marin Co Studebaker 

ADAMS, B., 950 Fifty-fifth St., Oakland Pope-Toledo 

FLATLAND, M., 1959 Mission St.. San Francisco Touring 

OLDER, F., care The Bulletin, San Francisco 

S. F. GAS AND ELEC. CO.. San Francisco Locomobile 

SHIPLEY, M. R„ 1070 Broadway. Oakland Maxwell 

MERLE, A,, Bay and Stockton Sts.. San Francisco Olds 

BUSSE, F. A., 112 Tenth St.. San Francisco Overland 

STEVENS, L. L., 654 Fifteenth St.. Oakland Cartercar 

CRELLIN, T. S„ 1394 Alice St.. Oakland Stevens-Duryea 

LOVDAL, O. A.. 3906 Clay St.. San Francisco Pope-Hartford 

STAMM. P. G.. 329 Hayes St.. San Francisco Pope Tourist 

LAMBERT. W. J. G„ Hotel Stewart. San Francisco Overland 

SOLTAN. H. J., 140 Alpine St.. San Francisco Dragon 

COLE, F„ 210 Walsworth St.. Oakland Ford 

EXCELSIOR SUPPLY CO.. .161 Golden Gate Ave.. San Francisco 



PAC. CEREAL ASSN., Bay and Taylor Sts., S. F Autocar 

HAWLEY. W. T., 3018 Harper St., Berkeley Reo 

SYVAYER, R. B., 232 Lake Shore Bldg.. Oakland Stevens- Bfl 

ELSEY. MRS. ANNA L., 653 Eleventh St., Oakland-- 

McCABTHNEY, MBS. ANNA. Bay Farm Island, Alameda 

DOHERTY. E., 2092 Howard St.. San Francisco Autocai 

METZGER, L., 58 Second St.. San Francisco W'inton 

SCOTT, s. F.. 1253 Octavia St., San Francisco H 

* * * 

The enthusiastic meeting of the automobile dealers of this 
city, beld some weeks ago, at which time the old organization was 
disbanded and a new organization, to be known as the Automo- 
bile Dealers' Association of San Francisco, was formed, and new 
officers elected, has met a Bnag which at the present time seems 
to have sent them dan'gerously near to disaster. All this 
happened at the second meeting of the dealers, which was held 
last Tuesday evening, when a special meeting was called for ac- 
tion on the committee report on a constitution and by-laws. 

The committee, instead of making a report, or rather present- 
ing the articles of the constitution and the by-laws, made a 
statement, in which they reviewed the objects of the association. 
The statement included a declaration that membership in the 
organization !«• restricted to automobile dealers only, thus bar- 
ring accessory, tire and garage men. h was this clause thai 
caused all the trouble and set the organization going in a dim- 
cm that looked dangerously near rain for it. 

Some of the members were anxious to have the sundry u[''ii 
included in the lis! of members. Others were firm in their opin- 
ion that the dealers alone should make up the membership, and 
while the discussion was spirited during the time it lasted, no 
vole was taken, for the President declared that the entire pro- 
ceedings were out of order. The committee, he claimed, had 
failed to report a constitution and by-laws. Following this rul- 
ing, a motion to adjourn passed unopposed. President I.. V. 
Lynch has given up hope to bring the dealers togethei again, 
for he felt sure at the time of his selection as head of the new 
association that an organization would be built up that would 
rank with the best in the country. 

The failure .if the dealer- ■> j-jve mi i he terms id' organiza- 
tion i- to be regretted by the trade generally, for with a good 
Dealers' Association working in unison, much could have been 
accomplished for the promotion of the industry in general. Every 




BUILT IN NEW ENGLAND 

FOR HARD SERVICE AND HILLY COUNTRY 



BEST BY TEST" 



The Slate of Maine, with its difficult roads, furnishes a hard tesl for a motoi car. There, all possible conditions of 
hilly country, rough roads and steep grades are encountered; yet statistics -how thai there were more ENOX ear- sold 

in Maine last year than all oilier makes, selling at $3,000 and over, combined. 

There must be a reason for this, as the modern motorist has reached the stage where he buys with his . j es (I ide open. 

Eoad conditions in the Stale of California are similar to those in Maine. Where power, durability and hill-climb- 
ing qualities are first considerations, the KNOX stands pre-eminent. 

A little detail of Knm- comforl over rough roads lies in the nickel steel springs of special costly alloy, mad 
a company that has been manufacturing springs for over one hundred years. The shock absorbers furnished as Stan l- 
ard equipment, aid the springs, and, together with the deepest, softest upholstery obtainable, gives the maximum com- 
fort to the passengers. 

Public approval has made the Knox reputation. II pays to buy the best, not only in material and design, but also in 
reputation. 

Licensed under Selden Patent 

RELIANCE AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 



342-352 VAN NESS AVENUE 



San Francisco 



July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



city of any importance in the United States has a deal 
ionization that is looked to in the matter of plain 
shows ami various contests that increases the general intei 
the game and a. Ms to the lists of prospective owners. The a 
sence of an organization of this character is missed on many 
other occasions; onej Eor instancej is the entertainmenl of celeb- 
rities in the motor car world thai honor the city with their 
presence. Last week, when Mrs. Fisher, who lias the record of 
crossing India and many untraveled Oriental roads in the Ori- 
ent, was a guest of the city, there was no automobile organiza- 
tion to entertain her. A banquet in her honor was given by the 
manager of a local Eactory branch in order to save the reputaf ion 
of San Francisco as a hospitable automobile center. 

Again, the absence of a dealers" organization will douhtless 
cause the loss of the, National Automobile Show, for which (he 
preliminary campaign was laid during the spring by one of the 
local agents who was on a visit to the factories. The manufac- 
turers were said to have looked favorably on the plan to hold 
the big show here under the auspices of a dealers' association, but 
with no such organization in existence here, no hope can be en- 
tertained at this time for the exhibit. 

It is to be hoped that some pressure be again brought to bear 
upon the dealers, and that a renewed effort be made to get to- 
gether and save what was foreshadowed to be a beneficial organi- 
zation to the trade in general and the entire business community 
of the city. 

Had the San Francisco Automobile Dealers' Association 
adopted a constitution and by-laws and perfected the organiza- 
tion outlined by the enthusiasts who were selected as officers, one 
of the first objects of the association would have been to promote 
good fellowship by holding pleasure trips to near-by points dur- 
ing the week-ends. With one of the tours every two weeks or 
so, it was believed that the members of the trade would have be- 
come better acquainted, and thus be enabled to work better for 
the advancement of the business. 

A. E. Hunter, one of the dealers who declared strongly in 
favor of limiting the members of the association to dealers only, 
pointed out the benefit that would have been derived from boost- 
ing the association by week-end tours. He said: "I had planned 
to introduce at an early meeting of the association a plan to hold 
short trips into the country. There are many attractive places 
in close proximity to San Francisco, where such trips could have 
been arranged, and these tours would certainly have broughf 
the dealers closer together and promoted a good feeling that 
could in no other way have been reached, fi is too bad that we 
cannot agree, 1ml there is nothing more to be done for the 
present." 

* * * 

Active work is new in progress on the Golden Gate road race 
which is (o be run on Saturday, September 10th, as one id' the 
star features "l the celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of the 
admission of California into the Union. The contest is to be held 
under the auspices of the Automobile Club of California, and 
thai organization has appointed Percy -1. Walker as chairman oi 
the race committee. Walker, who i« a local contractor, has been 
deeply interested in automobiling since the inception of the 
game in California, lie purchased one of the Srsl automobiles 
that ever came In the Coast. He ha- given all races an. I 
lesls in ibis viciniti |j (love attention, ami ha- gained a 
wide experience thai coven rj end of the sport. The Ameri- 
can Automobile Association recentlj selected him a- technical 
representative of 'lie organization on the Pacific C trib- 

ute lo his kne\. itomobile. 

Walker lias began the preliminary work in arranging the 

course for tin it. He has gone over the course, which 

if Boulevard, a short distance west of Nine- 
teenth avenue, runs west on the boulevard to the Ocean II 
\va\ ; thence north on the mean to the south entrance of Golden 
Gate Park: along the south ami middle drives of Hie Park to 
Nineteenth avenue; thence south on that street to the starting 

nt. He has carefully noted all the had spots along I 
and plans to have certain stretches in the Park fixed in such a 
manner that dangers of accidents may he eliminated as far as 

possible. A huge grand stand will be ei the start- 

val others will he constructed along the beach. 
The executive committee of the club, it is understood, has 

opened i with some of the large manufacturers 

maintaining racing crews, tod i1 
burners will be among the en 



o 



4 



i"- 



V 



A 









'/ ~> 



v#z. '■- The Escape from Worry 

Give us a winding road, a sky full of white 
floating clouds, a river and a bridge over which 
to rumble, a lake, blue and inviting, among 
green bills, an hour's run to dinner, and the sense 
of power and control at the wheel of a Rambler— 
and we will have no thought of business cares. 

With /T^TIIt-V-VKEW 

there is added to the pleasure of touring the satisfaction 
of freedom from the worries of the road. 
The great economy and efficiency of this car is due to 
such exclusive Rambler features as the offset crank- 
shaft, straight-line drive, new expanding clutch and 
Rambler Spare Wheel. 

Rambler Automobiles, $1,800 to $2,500. 

THOS. B. JEFFERY & CO. 

117-125 Valencia St. 
Near Market, 
San Francisco, Cat. 




WHAT CAN YOU PAY? 

The Question of Auto Upkeep Most Important 

It is not a question fully of what price v :SJ] afford to 

i- an "Electric" ear. but which one is the ver, 

made, ii respi tive of iu are going to be sure 

that von are dei he i ighl o 

In this connection, if it is fair to judge a man by his 
deeds, il is o to judgi trie" ear by its 

performances, and when this crucial teal i j applied the 
"Babeock" is the onlv one that will qualify uncondition- 
ally. 

It has earned its | D bitterly contested events 

and its accomplishments have become a part of the auto- 
mobile history of this country, or else its demonstrations 
have been made under the auspices of authorities so com- 
petent that their certi to the results cannot be put 
in question. 

It is a source of satisfaction to any one to own an '■Elec- 
tric," the selection of which caDnot subject him to adverse 
comment, and even competitors will admit that this is 
true of the "unbeaten Babeock.'' 

New models are on exhibition at 72-1 (iolden Gat' 
nue. and a call on the 'phone will bring a demonstration. 

PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO.. 724-32 Golden Gate kit., San Francisco 

188 12th St.. Oakland 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



The need for uniformity in the various county laws regulating 
the speed of motorcycles has long heen apparent, and.it is pleas- 
ing to note that Alameda County has recently joined the othei 
bay counties in a proposition lo confer with a view of drawing 
up similar codes for all. The diversity thai has hitherto e; iel & 
has worked I" the greal inconvenience of motorcyclists, who. 
while lawfully proceeding in one county, would suddenly be ar- 
rested, to find themselves in another county, probably without 
their knowledge, where different regulations prevailed. The 

sooner that uniformity is secured the better. 

* * * 

A Beautiful A utnmobile Trip. 

It would be difficult to imagine a more attractive motoring 
tour than that to Las Uvas, in the southwestern part of Santa 
Clara County. Splendid roads are to be found there, and the 
run from Oakland to San .Jose, and thence to the southward, 
is a magnificent one. The New Almaden road to Las Ovas leads to 
the attractive Uvas Creek, where there is good fishing, and by 
this route motorists may have a most enjoyable trip to Watson- 
ville and thence on to Monterey. The Monterey road, through 
Coyote, Mad vine and Cilmy. connects with the Las Uvas road at 
two or three places, while the Redmond road from Los Gatos 
also joins it. This route is becoming move popular every week, 
especially with week-end automobile parties. 

* * * 

Mr. A. II. Bar. President of the Denny-Bar Co., wl »n and 

operate six large general merchandise stores in Siskiyou County, 
was in the city last week, to purchase an automobile Eor rough 

country work in his vicinity. The competition among local 
dealers to land this order was keen, as they intend to use several 
more machines in their business as soon as they find the car thai 
will stand up under the strenuous work required. After exhaust- 
ive tests and comparisons, a Knox 40 h. p. touring car was 
selected and immediate delivery taken. Mr. Bar and party are 
now well on their way North, driving the car to Etna, where the 

headquarters of the firm are located. 

* * * 

Leon Sloss lias just taken delivery of a torpedo body Renault 
car. It has pigskin upholstering, and throughout the machine is 
elegantly furnished, and is probably the finest equipped car on 
the coast. Mr. Sloss put in some time studying the qualities of 
tires, and finally decided in favor of Morgan & Wright, which 
the Renault is now wearing. Mr. Sloss is a pioneer auto owner, 
having purchased one of the first cars that came to the city. He 
is consequently exceptionally well prepared to pass judgment on 

either automobile or equipment. 

* * * 

P. H. Lyon, vice-president of the Chanslor & Lyon Motor Sup- 
ply Company, is in town making headquarters at. bis firm's local 
branch. On his way up from Los Angeles. Mr. Lyon stopped at 
Fresno and gave attention to the new branch that Chanslor & 
Lyon are opening there. Prom here. Mr. Lyon goes to Seal lie. 
where he will spend some time looking for business interests 
before reluming home to Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Tom Skeggs, the pathfinder, writes from West Poinl as fol- 
lows: "The Morgan & Wright Nobby Tread Tires 1 am using on 
the Pathfinder ear for tin Munsey tour are the same set of tires 
that I used on the 'Little Gliddcn' Pathfinder. II rained all day 
and the roads were very slippery, bul T did not use chains. Total 
distance. 1572 miles." 

* * * 

Mr. John s. Md.ain. agent for the Franklin automobile, will 
leave for the Easl on July 8th, and will be at the factory in Sj ra- 
cuso for some time, before he returns, which he expects to do 
about the end of the month. 

* * » 

C. s. Richardson, of the Reliance Automobile Co., agents for 
the Detroit Electric, reports the sale of a "Model "l>" four-passen- 
ger brougham, to Mr. T. J. WVampelmeier of this city. 



FUHH TIRES 

Guaranteed for 5,000 miles or 200 days* service. Write for a 

copy of our Guarantee. 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER CO. 

544 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

Factories: Trenton, N. J. Branches in 16 Cities 



BOWSER- 

TANKS AND PUMPS FOR THE 
PRIVATE AND PUBLIC GARAGE 

MEAN 

Better Gasolene for Less Money 

Better, because the underground tank 
prevents evaporation, keeps the gasolene 
free from water, grit and dirt, and at an 
even temperature. 

For Less Money, because you can buy a 
barrel at a time, saving from 25 to 50% 
on every gallon used, and not lose a drop 
through evaporation or waste. This sav- 
ing alone is sufficient to pay for the out- 
fit in one season. 

If In a minute, by a few easy strokes of the 
pump, gasolene can be transferred directly 
into your car without exposing it to the 
air. Dangerous as gasolene is when hand- 
led the ordinary way, it becomes as safe 
as water when handled "the Bowser Way.'' 

f What wouldn't it mean to you to have 
the assurance that you will never again be 
subjected to the annoyance of having to 
wait for gasolene?— Of always having 
pure, strong gasolene, which would make 
your car tingle with pent-up energy and 
give it that easy, noiseless speed which . 
renders motoring so enjoyable? 

We have the lowest priced outfits and 
We Have the Best 

Bulletin No. 81 should be read by all car owners 

S. F. BOWSER & CO. INC., 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 
San Francisco Office: 612 Howard Street 



J 




.Iri.Y 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



One of the most sensations thai has ever ezcitei 

em Oregon was the murder of the Newel] brothers, re 
committed by a sheep-herder in their employ 
Sarcoid. The chase which followed and resulted in the mur- 
derer's capture was very materially aided by the nse of a Buick 
loaned by the Buick agencj of Lakeview, in th i which 

place the murder was committed. On numerous occasion 
fugitive's trail Led the posse off the roadSj and over what 
seemed practically impassable country. The Buick 3 no 
standing, was always in the lead and out-distanced the horses 
ai every Btage "I' the chase. Due i" the auto's service chiefly, 
Harrohl was never allowed to get far enough ahead i<> svade 
the pursuers. He has confessed the crime, I'm- which there is 
no excuse. The popularitj of the Newell boys, ami the revolting 
manner in which they were murdered, so enraged the community 
that only (he greatest precautions on the part of the officials 

prevented a lynching. 

* * * 

V. il. Howard, President of the Howard Automobile C 

pany, returned to San Francisco Monday after an extended tour 
in a Buick through Napa, Lake, Mendocino and Sonoma Coun- 
ties. While gone, Howard and family put in a few days at Aetna 
Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport ami .Met liny, a summer resort one 
miles north of Cloverdale on the Russian river. Howard reports 
the roads in tine condition, much attention having been given 
them, especially in Lake County. Unusually large number of 
auto touring parties are, as a consequence, resorting to this sec- 
tion of the State this year. Howard stayed in town but one night 
— leaving Tuesday for another tour. 

* * * 

Evidence of an unusual I v Mattering nature has just been given 
of the reputation that the Hupmobile is gaining as an accessor} 
car. A number of businessmen who own large ears for heavier 
work, because of the cheaper running expenses, have hem adding 
Hupmobiles to their garages for general utility purposes. The 
latest instance of this is that of H. (). Harrison, the well-known 
dealer in high-powered automobiles, who has just taken delivery 
of a Hupmobile from S. G. Chapman. This machine is to be 
used by Harrison in his business as a genera] runaboul ami 
utility car. 

* * * 

W. L. Brown, manager of Sudden & Christensen Lumber Co., 
of Los Angeles, has just driven up From the Southern metropolis 
in his Autocar. Mr. Brown was accompanied by his family, and 
the entire party report a most enjoyable trip. The ear ran per- 
fectly all the way, and reached San Francisco in great shape. 
Some two weeks will i"- spenl in this locality, and Mr. Brown 
contemplates making several local tours before returning home. 

\V. C. Black, who has driven his big Peerless car in excess of 
17,500 miles, using Monogram oil constantly, made a thorough 
investigation of his engine, and was surprised to Bnd absolutely 

ii.i carbon. This is a wonderful record, anil well indicate, ih, 

possibilities of lubricants when pure and properlj refined, 

* * * 

Tony Nichols, president of the Weinstock-Nichols Company, 
writes from Detroit, where he is nsiting the Morgan & W 

factory, that the plant is pushed to its utmost capaeitj i tel 

orders. The foreign department is doing a Burprisingh enor- 
mous business, this being especially so with Nobbj Tread tires. 

* * * 

The Globe I Irain and M tiling i ompany, thi 

of iis kind in Southern California, now emplo Oakland 

roadsters for its traveling salesmen, s. G. Chapman hat 
advised that these cars, which cover a territory ag into 

\n ona, Nevada and Ren Mexico, arc giving excell 

* • * 

The Pioneer Automobili Company receipt of 

gram stating that B. C. Pehmzc. driving Chalmers "30" 

.lass in Times Despatch North Carolina endurance run: car 

finished in perfect condition with no repairs. 



SOME people have TIRE TROUBLE, others buy and use the 
UTTLE WONDER VULCANIZER having detachable moulds which fit 
the size of their tires and is guaranteed to do perfect work, heated by 
electricity. Alcohol or Acetelcne Gas taken from tank or generator. 
Price of iron Vulcanizer, nicely nickel-plated $6.00, price of solid alumi- 
num Vulcanizer $7.00. 



I V'- X'^ 

11:.- .' -> Mt7~^I I II ill ' ' 4 *^29 



PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 

DISTRIBUTORS 
50 VAN NESS AVE., SAN FRANCISCO 



Have your automobile work done by a Reliable Firm. Cars 
wired for elecStric lights. All work guaranteed. No "overchirge" in 
this establishment. 

INDEPENDENT GARAGE 

BRANCH OF 

INDEPENDENT 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

Directors— S.H. Home, President: F.W.Dohrmann,Jr.,Vice-Pres.; ■ 

J. M. Carlson, Sec'y andTreaa.; C. M. Fickert, Dr. Kaspar Pischel. 

381 FULTON ST., San Francisco. Cal. S. H. HORNE, Manager 

Phone Market 2196 



Tire Cost is Lessened 

THE KEATON VULCANIZING WORKS 
616-618 Van Ness Avenue 

issue a new 
GUARANTEE ON RETREADS 

which should interest all owners. This guarantee is practically 
the same as that governing new tires and is most liberal in its 
terms. It will pay you to investigate this practical form of tire 
insurance. 

The Keaton Vulcanizing Works 
616-618 Van Ness Ave. 

REMEMBER THE NAME AND THE PUACE 



A Perfect Score 

FOR THE 

SPLITDORF equipped Reo and Mitchell Cars 

IN THE 

New York— Atlanta Reliability Tour 

Only the Be£t and Mo£t Dependable Ignition 

enabled these cars to achieve this splendid 

result. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 VAN NESS AVENUE San Francisco 



The Hill Climbing 
Car 



ft>L,vyviBV>s 
v Elecxric 



BAY CITIES ELECTRIC CO. 



1554-56 Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 1275 



1760-62 Teletrapb Ave.. Oakland 
Phone Piedmont 203 



Th c rm o \ d 

WILL NOT BURN— Li 

Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 
FACTORY 
REPRESENTATIVES 



Brake 
Lining 

544 Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



Tips to Automobilists 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and kee p it as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
14- MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Automobile Supplies and Re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

SAN MATEO.— Brown s Garage, 350 B street. Phone Mateo 67. 
C. J. Brown, Prop. Open day and night. Expert automobile re- 
pairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 

NORTH OF BELMON T. — Cypress L,odge. First-class mixed drinks. 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties. CHAS. P. HOWKE, Prop. ____ 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
PALO ALTO. — Palo Alto Garage, the only first-class fire-proof garage 
in Palo Alto. 443 Kmmerson street tone and a half blocks from depot.) 
Expert automobile mechanics. High-grade oils, gasoline and sundries. 
Carah & Schenck, prop. Phone P. A. 333. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE-WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and SL James 
streets. Aii,WO square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. (See under Stockton.) 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 

particular at ention. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

GILROY HOT SPRINGS.— Twelve miles of line, goo a road truin Gttirov, 
Just the place to stay over Saturday and Sunday. Hot plunge. Good 

lishing and hunting; (jasollne and automobile nils. 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout. Telephone 
Main 861. - 

MADRON E. — Madrone Exchange. A. Boecker, Prop. Gasoline. Meals 
at all hours. Phone Farmers 93 for special chicken dinner. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 
ALAMEDA— PARK GARAGE. William Higby, Prop. Machine and re- 
pair work. Automobiles for hire. 1600 Park street, cor. Lincoln avenue. 
Park Street Station. Telephone, Alameda 386. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 
UKIAH, CAL. — Ukiah Garage. John Snow, proprietor. Expert auto- 
mobile repairing. Sundries, Oils, Gasoline. Best equipped garage in 
Mendocino County. Open day and night. Telephone 1263. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
Warren's Garage. Fully equipped blacksmith and 



CLOVERDALE 

machine shop. Expert Auto Repairing, Gasoline and Supplies, 
and night. Phone Main 221. Geo. F. Warren, Proprietor. 



Open day 



CLOVERDALE.— United States Hotel. M. Menihan, Proprietor. Only 
first class hotel in town. Electric lighted. Hot and cold water In every 
room. Detached baths, special attention to touring parties. Phone Main 
233. ' . 

SANTA ROSA. — Houts Auto Co., Mendocino avenue, one-half block 
north of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils 
and gasoline. Open day and nighL Tel. 527. 

BOYES HOT SPRINGS.— Steve's Grill. The automobilist's paradise— 
where you can obtain the finest and most appetizing breakfast, lunch 
or dinner In the State of California. Special attention given to auto- 
mobilists. Wines and liquors of ail kinds. Tel. Sub 64. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT, CAL. — Enterprise Machine Works. H. Slotter and J. A. 
Schneider, Props. Forbes street, between 9th and 10th. Phone 66. Ex- 
pert auto repairing, electrical work. Agents for Panhard Oils and Greases, 
Gasoline, Batteries and Auto Supplies. 

NAPA COUNTY. 
NAPA. — Elegant roads from Vallejo, through Napa County. The GEO. 
D. REYNOLDS GARAGE. 208 N. Main street. Automobile repairing and 

sundries. Panhard Oil a specialty. ■ 

PETRIFIED FOREST. — Five miles from Calistoga, on the Santa Rosa 
road. One of the world's wonders. Here the eye is attracted and the 
mind is overwhelmed in a bewildering mass of giant trees trampled to 
earth by the forces of early volcanic action and long since turned to stone. 
Good automobile road. J. I. NELSON, Santa Rosa, R. F. P. No. 6. 

, ST. HELENA.— Philo S. Grant Garage. Phone Main 771. General 
Machinists. Expert automobile repairing. Oils, sundries and gasoline. 
Service at all hours. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

STOCKTON— WALLACE BROS.* GARAGE. 30 S. Sutter Street. Most 

convenient location. Best of service. Large stock sundries. Rambler, 

Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Main 287. (See San Jose.) 



AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

444 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Everything for the Auto at Prices which are Right 

Open Evenings Until 9 P. M. Open Sundays Until 3 P. M. 



Irwin A. Kuhn ; sales manager of the Babcock Electric, and one 
of the most prominent figures in the electric vehicle business, ar- 
rived in San Francisco recently from Los Angeles, where he has 
been spending some time with the Southern California Babcoek 
agency. While in San Francisco he will make headquarters 
with the Pioneer Automobile Company, who are distributors of 
the Babcock Electrics in tin? territory. His stay will cover sev- 
eral weeks, during which time he will thoroughly investigate the 
local field. 

"I find the principal requisite out here is that a car -be an 
efficient machine on hills. In this respect we have nothing to 
fear, as the Babcock has conclusively proven itself in numerous 
contests as well as in practical service to be among the very 
sturdiest of hill climbers irrespective of price. Consequently we 
always welcome the hill climbing test when demonstrating. San 
Francisco, in particular, demands a car with hill climbing capa- 
bilities." 

Before leaving San Francisco, Mr. Kuhn will pull off some 
interesting demonstrations with the Babcock. The hardest courses 
in the city will all be negotiated, and Mr. Kuhn has invited any 
one interested in electrics to accompany him. 

* * * 

Taking the advice of H. O. Harrison, the Western distributor 
of the Peerless cars, the well-known manufacturers of the 
machines in Cleveland has adopted a new color as a standard 
body color for next season. The new color will be known as the 
Harrison Gray, and will be of ihe dark shade. "I have thought 
a great deal about the color scheme of motor ears," said Ha 
"and at last I decided that on account of the dust in this country, 
a color should be used that would stand the marks of this dust 
and travel as little as possible. I explained this idea to the manu- 
facturers while at Cleveland, and was gratified to receive word 
that my color had been adopted as a regular line for 1911 models, 
and that the factory had also named the new color the Harrison 
Gray. The first shipment of 1911 Peerless cars with this new 
color will arrive next week." 

* * * 

Flemming & Tebbetts, Oakland distributors of Morgan & 
Wright tires, are moving into a new house at l"Jth and Harrison 
streets. The new quarters are to be well equipped, and will offer 
best accommodations to customers. The room is to be spacious, 
and the interior is to be finished after the Mission type, making 
an appearance unexcelled by any similar oaent on the 

Coast. Since taking the Morgan & Wright line, Flemming & 
Tebbetts' business has steadily increased, and this move is to be 
made that they might more adequately care for this growing 
trade. 

* * * 

Several of the Park baseball teams are playing this year un- 
der the colors of various makes of automobiles. Prominent 
among these is the Hupmobile Junior team, which is one of the 
chief contenders for this season's baseball honors in the Park 
fandom. This team has been winning with astonishing fre- 
quency, having annexed fully seventy-live per cent of the games 
played. S. G. Chapman declares that they are playing up to 
Hupmobile standard. 

* * * 

Harry Goldberg, of Goldberg, Bowen Co., and Frank Carroll, 
assistant to George P. Moore. Pacific Coast representative of 
Monogram oils, have started on a tour of Sonoma, Mendocino, 
Lake and Napa Counties in Goldberg's Autocar roadster. A 
complete camping outfit is carried, and full fishing tackle as 
well. About 1,500 miles will be covered by the car on this trip. 

* * * 

Now that the Glidden tour is on, it is becoming more evident 
that the laying out of the route by the Chalmers "30" was in 

itself a great achievement. This little ear ran on a -■ > 

the entire course without trouble of any s. .it. and 

competing in the main event, it is certain that its road test would 

have been perfect. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

NOTHING BUT THE BEST 

CO. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



CHANSLOR 

Polk and Golden Gate 



& LYON MOTOR SUPPLY 



July 2, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Driving his handsome now 1!U1 Everitt touring car, II. 0. 
Harrison and Mrs. Harrison are enjo 

upper Maine woods id Nevi England ie ol the most enjo 

jaunts over planned bj a local autoist. For three years Harrison 

has endeavored to take this trip, and was lie 

able to get away from his imported business ei 

enough to enjoy the drive through the most beautiful part of the 

entire East. 

Following a week's visit to the Everitt factory, Harrison, who 
was called East to discuss with the makers of this popular priced 
car, the added refinements which are to be placed on this year's 
machine, Harrison started for Boston in the first 1911 Everitl 
turned out of the factory. The chassis is finished just as the 
latest model Everitt cars are to be turned out. The fore-door 
body of the car is the latest 1911 model. 

The following letter in appreciation of Diamond tires has 
just been received by the local branch of the Diamond Rubber 
Co., from the S. & W. Motorium of Oakland : 

"We would like to express our appreciation of your auto tires. 
Two years ago we completed a car designated and manufactured 
by us with our own engine and patent frame, 'Torpedo Hood.' 
We wanted the best tires on this car, so decided upon the Dia- 
mond. They arc 28x3 Regular •Clincher — the four tires have 
been on the full two years, and have gone 8,500 miles, and are, 
in our judgment, easily good for that much more. So we are 
assured that our choice was properly made upon the Diamond 
tires. 

"We would be pleased to have you refer any one to us who 
wants to know the merit of Diamond tires." 

* * * 

One of the chief evidences given of the automobile's practical 
utility is its extensive use in various California oil fields. 
Throughout the oil district the roads are far from good. This 
is partly due to the rapidity with which the country has been 
opened up and partly to the heavy haulage to which the roads 
are constantly subjected. The sandy nature of the soil, too, is 
not conducive to solidity of road bed. Among the machines that 
are becoming famed for the hard service rendered over these 
roads is the Haynes, owned by the Kern River Oil Fields of Cali- 
fornia. This car has demonstrated its ability to take the hardest 
going under the most favorable conditions, and to keep going all 
the time. 

* * * 

H. A. Taussig, who made a trans-continental trip from Sau 
Francisco to New York in his Thomas Flyer and later used it in 
touring Europe, is now making a tour of the Western States in 
it. Writing to his friend, Calvin C. Eih, of the Pioneer Automo- 
bile Co., from Olequa, Washington, he said: "878 miles from 
San Francisco. Had delightful run up California Coast to Cres- 
cent City, then across to Grant's Pass and on to Portland. Hope 
to reach Seattle to-day. The trip has been thoroughly enjoyed 
by the entire party." 

* * * 

R. S. Ireland, sales manager of the Ajax-Grieb Rubber Com- 
pany, reports that out of eight cars in the Atlanta-New York 
Good Roads Contest equipped with Ajax tires, noi a single one 
was obliged during the entire trip of 1100 miles to put on anew 
casing. Considering the terrible road conditions, this showing 
of the Ajax product is very gratifying to the makers of the same. 




'When you find 
a better oil than 
Zerolene — use that 
oil." 



ZEROLENE 



The One Oil for all Gasoline Motors 

In sealed cans with patent spout. Barrels for garage trade. 
Sold by most dealers ; if not at yours, write to the 

Standard Oil Company * 

(Incorporated) 
461 Market St., San Francisco 



FOR SALE 

Autocar Runabout 

With top, lamps and generator 
in good condition $200. The 
most reliable of them all. 

453 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



"IExuV* Sparking" Batteries 

BATTERIES CHARGED AND OVERHAULED 

ELECTRICAL VEHICLE CHARGING AND REPAIRING 

AUTOMOBILE WIRING FOR ELECTRIC LIGHTS 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 630 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Franklin 2772 



Vulcanizing 



PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Neaa Avenue. 



San Franclaco, Cal. 



RENAULT "The Car" Guaranteed For Life 




NEW PRICES FOR 1910 



Voiturelle 

9 H. P. 

10 H. P. 4 cyl. 
1216 H. P. 
14-20 H. P. 
18-24 H P 
20-30 H. P 
25-35 H. P. 
35-45 H. P. 
50-60 H. P. 



6 cyl. "link Six' 

4 cyl. 

4 cyl. 

4 cyl. 

6 cyl. "Bii Sii" 



Closed Cars 

complete 



»3OO0 
3500 
4000 
5500 
6250 
6500 
htaai 
7500 
8500 



Tourintr or Runabouts 
complete 
(1750 
2500 
3000 
3200 
4500 
S250 
5500 
5800 
6500 
7500 



ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 

316-322 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. Cal. Telephone, Market 7038 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 




Aggrkssive Policy 
of Germany. 



The situation in the Near East is 
rapidly assuming an interesting as 
well as a dangerous aspect. It will 
be remembered that a few weeks ago 
the News Letter pointed out how a Turkish General marched 
his troops across the Persian border and gave as his excuse a 
misapprehension of the location of the Persia-Turke] boundary 
line, and that he would immediately recross and quarter hid 
battalions on Turkish soil in Asia Minor. It will also be re- 
membered how Germany, believing that Turkey had in mind the 
permanent occupation of certain sections of Persia as a stepping 

stone to a general invasion, had asked the Turkish Gover enl 

to permit the German empire in co-operate with the Sultan's 
plans in Persia, and how the Sultan had intimated thai 
co-operation should work to the advantage of both Turkey and 
Germany. As stated at tin' time, Germany's request for co-op- 
eration stated as one reason for making it was Germany's desire 
to open a field in Persia for the employment of German capital 
in industrial, commercial and railway enterprises, to which 
Turkey found no objection. It now transpires that the Turkish 
General has not only not made any effort to withdraw his troops, 
but has inaugurated a system of taxation and imposed it upon 
the people of Persia in the territory occupied by him. Naturally, 
the Persian Government is making vigorous protest against this 
Turkish invasion, and Germany's apparent identification with 
the scheme almost gives the protest the ring of a threat, and 
serious trouble is sure to follow and involve the entire Near 
East, which in case of war would mean 

pretty much the whole of Europe. More = 

than likely, however, the Turkish Gov- 
ernment would withdraw its army of Per- 
sian invasion rather than have it driven 
out by Russia and Croat Britain, for in 
theory, at least, by an Anglo-Russian 
agreement made a year ago the whole of 
the north half of Persia is a Russian 
sphere of influence, and the Southern is a 
British sphere of influence, which in dip- 
lomatic parlance is meaningless, but in 
reality mean- thai so soon as the Persian 
melon is ripe enough to he cut. England 
will take the southern half and Kussia the 
northern half. And in theory, also, the 
invasion of Persia by Turkey is the in- 
vasion of British and Russian territory, 
and Germany encouraging Turkey to 
"stick," and promising co-operation, is 
well calculated to make the situation in tie' 
Near East unmistakably threatening and 
critical, and which, if further intensified 
by the action of Germany and Turkey in 
the Persian game, it will not be long be- 
fore something more to the point than 
protests will have to be employed. The 
safety of British India demands that 
Southern Persia, the Persian Gulf ami the 
Gulf Oman be under British influent 
against any possible breaking up of the 
Turkish Empire in Asia Minor, and Rus- 
sia is equally in need of tic northern half 
of Persia aud the Caspian Sea to 
strengthen her possessions in Asia againsl 
Germanic occupation of any considerable 
portion of Asia Minor, where about 3,000 
miles of railroad are already completed, 
>r under construction ami financiered by 
German capital. 



all seem to foreshadow the breaking up of the Turkish Empire 
in the not 'very distant future, for which the nations are getting 
ready for the division. At this distance the new Turkey appears 
to be growing in national peace with not a few indications of 
prosperity, bui the fact is glaring enough that the nation is be- 
c ing divided against itself. Macedonia, the supposed strong- 
hold of the Young Turk party, is in a state of political and re- 
ligious unrest, which bodes no good to the Empire. Albania is 
in a state of insurrection, and the army i> powerless to pul it 
down. The action of the Government in the Crete affairs is 
either evidence of cowardice or a confession of weakness, but. a 
positive policy would mean war with Greece, and upon that ipies- 
tion the people are hopelessly divided; besides all that, the 

Mohammedan element, which is the supreme religious power of 
the country, is fairrj rushing hack into intolerance and brutality. 
which is winked at by the Government rather than condemned. 
Therefore the nation is heading for the breakers of religious 
hatred and national destruction. The Greek and other Christian 
subjects of the Sultan arc rapidly losing interest in their coun- 
try's welfare, while the Young Turk' party appears to be losing 
its hold on ilie confidence of the people other than of the ultra- 
Mussulmans. But what seems to he the hardest down-hill push 
Turkey has yet given herself, anil which is likely to expedite 

the final solution of the Near East problem is permission for the 
strengthening and widening of German influence in Syria and 
Palestine, and reaching it at Bast a- the rich valleys and table- 
lands of 111..- .Ionian. Euphrates and Tigris rivers, [t goes with- 
out having it mentioned in a written treaty that hack of the 
German influence that could secure so much is a colonization 
scheme in a country where German capital and German contrac- 
tors are either surveying locations or constructing railroads for 
permanent occupation. This move of Germany has no other In- 
terpretation other than a linn conviction that the days of the 
Turkish Empire are numbered, and thai the Kaiser proposes to 
bi the ground with his pre-emption claims when the break-up 



FROM GOLF LINKS TO OFFICE 




Many a man would be unable to enjoy the healthful exercise 
of golf if the telephone did not keep him in touch with 
his business. 

A word over the wire saves him an hour's delay in leaving 
the office. There is another reason. 

The 



But tin' Persian affair is only one 

of the events that seem ben! on involving 
the Near East in serious trouble, ami til \ 



busy man's day is made shorter by the Bell Service, 
which brings him in instant communication, not only 
with his fellow townsmen, but with correspondents in 
distant cities. 

The Bell System provides universal service to meet the needs 
of all users. 

The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Co. 

Every Bell Telephone is the Center of the System. 





July 2. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



comes. The same genera] purpose 

operate with Turkej in Persia. The regi nam is 

arranging for in Asia Minor consists of more than 110,000 

square miles, with a Pores! area of about 18,000,000 ni 

the German Emperor is an enterprising ruin-; besides, he knows 

ilial I'n 1 1 possession of Syria is worth fightin» for, even 

obliges the making of a now map of the "near Kast. ' 

mil prognostications. They are a lis! of the plements thai go 

to make up the situation in the Near Kast as ii is to-da 



Russian court and arm} cin 
<>i- General [nterest. in a state of feverish excitement over 
Germany's intentions in Persia and 
the Kaiser's colonization scheme in Syria. 

The Cretans have told the protecting powers thai thej will not 
yield to Turkish suzerainty. 

Several of the leading German newspapers are advocating a 
tripartite between Germany, England and the United States 
for the one purpose of preserving the peace of the world. The 
scheme is not favorably considered in (.'real Britain. 

France has thrown a fire-brand at Germany by trying to per- 
Buade the young men of Alsace and Lorraine to join the French 
army. 

Alter backing and filling for a century, England and the 
United Slates will leave the Newfoundland fisher} dispute to a 
hoard of arbitration. 

Spain and the Vatican arc at outs over .Spain's demand for a 
revision of the existing concordat The Vatican files a vigorous 
protest. 



UNION AGAINST UNION. 

Closely following the sensible action by Congress refusing to 
exempt the labor trust from the operations of the Sherman anti- 
trust law, comes a charge against a labor union of conspiracy in 
restraint of trade, brought by union men themselves. The co- 
incidence of the two events is eloquent. 

The complainant in the case is the Plumbers and GaB Fillers' 
Helpers' Union, Local No. 1, This organization is aggrieved 
because the Journeymen Plumbers, (las and Steam Fitters' 
Union, Local No. 1 1, has apparently browbeaten the Masti i 
Plumbers' Association into an agreement by which the latter 
shall employ but one helper in its simp- for every lour journey- 
men. As a result, 125 helpers have been discharged, not be- 
cause their work was nol entirely satisfactory, but because a 
failure on the part of the Master Plumbers to obey the behest of 
the journeymen's union would have ruined business. 

This is a palpable conspiracy in restraini of trade, as well as 
an outrage on the rights of ever] man to earn an bonesl living. 
The journeymen plumbers evidently wish to Keep up a close 
corporation, limiting the number of those who may engage in it. 

The same thing has occurred in other trades, bill ii was usually 

the poor outsider, the youth Beeking an honest trade, that suf- 
fered. Now thai the shoe pinches on union men themselves, 
there is a loud protest. Even a plumbers' helper can recognize 

rank injustice when it is forced upon him. 'The shoe pinches 

in a different place ibis time. 



"(leorge, have yov seen any of those new Chantecler 

hats?" "Why, yea, a few." "I must have one. Everybody is 
talking about them." "A Chantecler wouldn't look good on 
you, ni\ dcai-. It's the sorl of hat that's becoming to a woman 
like Jane IV Plypp." "Mercyl I wouldn'l bavi on for the 
world." ' 'I vi land Plain Dealer. 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco is located at 626 

Merchants' Exchange building, where all business of the Citi- 
zens' Alliance is transacted. The Free Labor Bureau, of the 
Alliance, in Oakland, is at 804 Broadway. All classes of male 
help is furnished, absolutely free, to employer and employee. 



Now is the time to have your carpets cleaned — while away 

on your vacation. Telephone to the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning 
Works. 9S0 Golden Gate avenue (telephone Market 6-13). and 
they will call for them. You may allow them to remain at the 
works until your return, or have them returned at once, as you 
desire. All work guaranteed. 

Wedding Present*. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




< 



FISH 
All Sea Foods 



No better or more delicate 
flavor can be added to all 
fish cooking than by using 

LEA&PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

A perfect seasoning for 
Soups, Steaks, Chops, 
Roasts, Gravies and 
Salad Dressi ngs. 

It Aids Digestion. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agts. , N. Y. 



BUNGALOW TO LET IN ALAMEDA 



Furnished Mission Bungalow of 8 
rooms, sleeping-porch, garage, sun- 
parlor, and large garden; 25 minutes 
to the city. 1515 4th Street corner 
Haight Ave., Alameda, Phone 2828. 



!f California Door Co. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

DOORS, SASH, BLINDS 

Large and Complete Stock at 
LOWEST PRICES 



Phone Kearny 2010 



43-49 Main Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M. Galen Bide., 381 Sutter Street 

and by appointment San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 4188 

ALFRED BANNISTER 

EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

1434 Port Street _ „ <> ,. S»n Francl»oo 

Phone Kearny 387J 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $ 1,300,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Banaom* Streets, 
Ban Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, 1400,000. Cash Assets. J970.14S 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability. Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green. President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton. John C. Cole- 
man. W. E. Dean. r. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moflitt. J. W. Phillips. Henry 
Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St.. 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established I860. 

Cash Capital 11,000,000 

Cash Assets 6.966,216 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,790,360 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL, BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Managar. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital H.700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents. 
HO California Street Ban Francisco 

The We& Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

BAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Oeo. H. Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
119 California St., Ban Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas till 



PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY OF CALLF0RNI A 

Incorporated 1885 
SURETY ON BONDS 

PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Head Office-FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
FRED B. LLOYD, President 



Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 



Succeeding A. Zeilerbtch & Sou 



Zellerbach Building. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 

Rriwhp^ Back to our 0ld locatlon ' 623 8acramento 8treet between 

1JI UMlCo Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes, Broome and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets, Chamois 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 




INSVMNCB 




No answer has been received from the Board of Fire Under- 
writers of the Pacific by the Oakland authorities on the matter 
of reducing rates in the Oakland business district, and the opin- 
ion prevails that no practical n duetion will be forthcoming until 
a number of improvements bave been added to those already 
made in fire-fighting and protective facilities. 

* * * 

The Merchants' Fire of Denver is experiencing some difficulty 
in securing a California license, and from present indications, 
may find it impossible to comply with the requirements of the 
California insurance department, The papers submitted by the 
company have been returned, and further negotiations al lea 

temporarily suspended. 

* * * 

An ordinance has been passed and signed by the Mayor of San 
Francisco authorizing the Board of Public V7orks to advertise 
for bids and award contract for one motor propelled combination, 
chemical and hose wagon to cost $5,000; one motor propelled 
fire engine to cost not to exceed -$8,000 ; two combination chemi- 
cal and hose wagons for the proper equipment of the high pres- 
sure pumping system, $11,000; and $8,000 is appropriated for 

the purchase of hose. 

* * * 

Despite the ruling of the Attorney-General of the State of 
California, made last year, that continuous bonds would not be 
accepted from companies applying to the California insurance 
department for renewal of their licenses, many companies are 
filing such bonds this year with their applications, and in .ill 
such cases a new bond is being required. 

* * * 

The Los Angeles Fire, the new California company that made 
application some weeks ago for authority to transact business, 
will be examined by T. W. Kirby, who left June 27th for Los 

Angeles for the purpose. 

* * * 

Manager B. H. Hart has gone East lo attend the annual 
convention of agents of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany. 

* * * 

It never has been, and probably never will be, possible to or- 
ganize fire insurance interests into a trust. The business is one 
which has always been, and will doubtless continue to be, 
erned by independent and individual action. Notwithstanding 
the fact that upon a business transacted during the past twenty 
years of over $3,000,000,000 in premiums written, there has been 
a trade profit — not taking into consideration the increase in un- 
earned premiums — of less than three per cent, there is a constant 
and persistent demand on the part of property owners, supported 
by some State officials, for a lowering of the cost of the indemnity 
which the companies furnish. 

* * * 

The Western States Life Insurance Company of San Fran- 
cisco was licensed last Saturday by Insurance Commissioner 
Cooper. Pratt & Grigsbv, the promoters and general managers 
of this company, have sold $700,000 in stock for $1,400,000, 
par value of shares being $10. The price of the remaining 30,000 
shares will be advanced to $25 per share. When all the stock is 
sold, it is claimed that the company will have $1,000,000 capital 
and a surplus of about $500,000 net surplus. Pratt & Grigsby 
have contracted to put on $20,000,000 of new business yearly for 
a term of five years, failing in which they will forfeit their re- 
newal interest. The company is now writing business at a rapid 
rate, with a large force of skilled producers. 

* * » 

Average insurance rates in the business section of Seattle 
will be reduced 8 to 15 per cent, according to the recommenda- 
tion of Lee McKenzie, Washington insurance surveyor, after in- 
vestigation and inspection by five men covering a period of four 
months. The rate dates back to April 1st, and rebates on all 
premiums paid since that time, down to the level of the new rates, 



mi, 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



1 ii made by Hie various companies doing business in that 
city. Improved physical condition for the 

it ion. 

* * * 

Two importanl insurance cases were decidei b Judge Van 
Fleet in the LT. S. Cirouil Couri this week. I as were 

brought against the Norwich Union, the plaintiffs being the 
Ralph Brown Company and Henry Caballe. Both a 
brought t" recover under the agreement made with the insurance 
company which agreed to pay fifty per cent cash on po 
further ; it' it was shown that the insurance company had volun- 
tarily paid ii larger amount to another insurer, thai the princi- 
pals should receive a larger amount in proportion. In the Ralph 
Brown case it was alleged that the company had paid larger 
sums, but it was shown that in the eases cited the amount had 
been paid on judgments. Judge Van Fleet held that the com- 
pany was compelled to pay the judgment, and it was not a vol- 
untary act and dismissed the action, (laballe settled with the 
company for $2,250 on a $4,500 policy. He sued in the State 
court for $2,000, waiving the right to $250, so that it could not 
be removed to the Federal Courts. It was contended by the com- 
pany that while the suit was for only $2,000. the interest made 
it over that amount. Judge Van Fleet held that interest could 
not be taken into consideration, and remanded the case to the 

State courts. 

* * * 

The Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific has granted an 
extension to the insurance in Portland as to the time when the 
change in the commissions to be paid on term and commercial 
business shall expire. The agents have been receiving 20 per 
cent, and this was cut to 15 to take effect in July. 

The Ogden Board of Fire Underwriters, which has been inac- 
tive for the past two years, is about to reorganize. Fully 75 per- 
cent of the fire insurance agents of the town have signed a peti- 
tion favoring a revival of the old board, and District Manager 
George V. Lawry of the Pacific Board has been importuned to 
lend his aid. As soon as his time will permit, Manager Lawry 
will go to the Junction City and render the necessary assistance. 

* * * 

W. C. Holliway, receiver for the California Mutual Live Stock 
Insurance Company announces his intent to at once begin suit 
against the policyholders of thai concern Eot the amounl of their 
premium notes, aggregating more than $70,000, with interest 

added. 

Dr. "Urn. C. Voorsanger lias been appointed Medical Referee 
for the Travelers' California Department, the office to become 

ell'rel i\e July 1st. 

W. It. Belts, secretary of the Continental Casualty Company 
of Chicago, made one of bis flying visits to the Coast last week. 

The American Druggists' Fire Insurance Company of Cin- 
cinnati, has made application for a California license, and ap- 
pointed V. 0. Ainslej gem ral 

Members of thi Inspection Committee of the National Board 
have been le: of the Oakland city mains, and 

will next have an examination of the engines and apparatus and 
.i pracl teal demon I ration of the depart menl in action. 

Fire insurani e p inies dei I to « rite risks in the new 

i town ot r ii San Bernardino < lounty. 

Frank M. Thoi Phoenix, Arizona, has been appointed 

supervisor for the Reliance Life in Arizona. New Mexico and 
i n Texas. 
\l. Halm, of Phoenix, will be the President of the pro- 
posed Arizona Fire Insurance Co., capitalized at $'.'it0,000. 

The National Surety Companj has appointed Charles S 
Jr.. gene] >r Southern California. 

\\ iHi.. While will represent the Roman Catholic Life 

[nsura of America in California. 

The San Fran of the Phoenix Mutual Life bae 

moved to the David Bewes Building. 

The Aetna's automobile department has been placed under the 
management oi L A \ a's agency in Los Angeles. 

je ii. S. Halej Co. las tb -elusive agency for the 
National Fire at Oakland. 



| THE COOL DELICIOUSNESS OF A 

1 HUNTER 
I WHISKEY 
I JULEP 

1 IS POSITIVELY UNSURPASSED I 



Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 




City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. AH legal papers drawn up accurately, 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. 8., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 408 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN EY8-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. 8hortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dre. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and in-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
205-206 Westbank Building, 830 Market street, San Francisco. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles. Shingles, Split Shakes, Etc. 
Main Office— Crocker Bide., San Francisco 

Tarda and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 



New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



Flags, Tents and Canoes 

CAMP FURNITURE and GARDEN HOSE 

If you want Quality and Lowest Prices, call at 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON CO. 

51 Market Street San Francisco 



1 isand machinists. Luckily 

there ■ irk for these men in 

Thai town is a hummer. It look? like a little Chicago. 
Sorry we cannol accommodate them here, 



ASK YOUR 
DEALER FOR 

GOODYEAR 

"HIPPO" 

HOSE 




GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
. H. PFASE. Pr«: 589. 591. 593 Mirkel St.. S. F. 



Guirmteed to 

Sund 700 lbs. 

Pressure 

Try It ind Be 

Convinced 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 2, 1910. 




WAITING. 
The sun burns hot in ;i cloudless >kv. 
The yellow poppies droop and die, 
Ami mile "ii mile a barren land, 
Stretches a waste of trackless sand. 
The far hills swim in a mist of heat, 
Where cactus and sage and greasewood meet, 
And nvei- all— silence— unending, deep, 
As that lasl mysterious, endless sleep. 
While calm, unmoved by changing I' i 
Throughout the ages, the desert— waits. 

Away Erom the busy whirl id' life, 

Away Erom Us struggles and endless strife, 

Away Erom its jealousies, heartaches and pain, 

lis rush for gold and its greed Eoi gain, 

Calm, after storms of passions thai teai 

Alone in this blessed quiet 1 fare — 

Away from life's lives, away from its hates, 

My barren heart, with the desert — wails. 

— Mary Armstrong Ryan in Out lies/.. 



CLOSING THE nanus. 

I have closed the door on Doubt ; 
I will go by what light L can find, 

And hold up my hands, and reach them mil 
Tii the glimmer of God in the dark, and call: 
"I am Thine, though I grope and stumble and fall. 

1 serve ; and Thy sendee is kind." 

I have closed the door on Pear. 

He has lived with me far too long. 
If he were to break forth and reappear, 

I should lift my eyes and look at the sky, 

And sing aloud, and rim lightly by: 
He will never follow a song. 

I have closed the door on Gloom. 

His house has too narrow a view. 
I must seek for my soul a wider room. 

"With windows to open and lei in the sun. 

Anil radiant lamps where the day is done. 
And the breeze of the world blowing through. 

— fmif I'. McKeehan in Century. 



.1 SONG. 
This, llii-' was thy love I" me — 
A bird's song breaking clear and lone 
From the heart of a leafless tree; 
A lighted doorway, open thrown 
At a desperate midnighi plea ; 
A wildflower found in a waste of stone; 
My name soft-called in a land unknot □ ; 
A rainbow in the spindrift, blown 
From a eresl of the whelming sea! 

— Susan Dyer in Everybody's. 



THE GAME OF LIFE. 
Who eares for the goal? It's the game 
Sets the pulses aflame. » 

The goal is satiety. Bliss 
In the eha.se alone is ! 
God, give us the hunt — though the pre 
Shall escape us to-day. 

— -Clinton Dangerfield in Smart Set. 



TFCHAII tavern 

X DVllllV COR. POWELL and EDDY STS.S. P. 

Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladles' Grill 

Have Secured 

SIGNOR GINO SEVERI 

to conduct, their orchestra commencing April 22nd, 1910 

Concerts daily during Luncheon, Shopping Hours, Dinner and 
After Theatre 

Special Lunch Served During Shopping Hours 

Under the management of A. C. MORRISSON 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 



Bay State Restaurant & Hotel 



269 OFARRELL STREET 



Serve Excellent 
Special Lunches 
Excellent French Dinner 



NEAR MASON 



50c 
75c 



Hungarian Orchestra, 12 to 2 p. m. — 6 to 8 p. m. 



MUSIC EVERY EVENING 
French Dinner served with Red or White Wine $1.00 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Phone Kearny 1812 Ladles Grill 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pure Water for Oakland 
Ulnar il 

Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 

treated, but bacteiiologically purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 

DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK, $1.60 per month. Single i gallon 

bottle, 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 snd Horns A 41(2. 
980 <5tb Street OakUsd. Ctl. 




Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



PEPSIN 

CUM 



•UP1RIOR TO ALL 



July 8, L910. 



and California Advertiser 



THE FOURTH IV 8 I.YV.l CRUZ. 
The Santa Cnu Beach Company announces thai nexl \i. 

it will present to its patrons i - 

resort the mosl elaborate Fourth of Jul\ celebration ever pro- 
duced there. In addition to the usual patriotic parades, there 
will be a parade of automobiles to be decorated by the ladies of 
.Santa Cruz, a prize of $400 having been offered for the besl 
decorated automobile. Over $1,000 worth of Fireworks will be 
used in the grand nighl display, which will contain many Bel 
pieces, the last of which will be the legend: "Never a hull 

Moment from Now On." 

A Large dirigible airship. 11- feet long, operated by a la horse 
power Curtiss engine, will fly over the city during the day. Then: 
will also he a balloon ascension and parachute jump, games on 
the beach, swimming races, chasing ducks in the water, and aerial 
bicycle riding. 

Direct wires run into the Casino will give bulletins of sporting 
events of the day at distant points. 



GOLF AND TENNIS AT THE POTTER. 

Coif players of California and the Pacific Coast will be invited 
to lake part in a tournament at the links of the Potter Country 
Club this summer. The beautiful Hope ranch course has never 
been initiated by a big tournament, but it is the plan of the Pot- 
ter Hotel directors to arrange yearly matches hereafter. The 
contest is arranged for August 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th at the 
same time as the regatta in the channel takes place. Great im- 
provements are being made, and these, combined with the natural 
spottiness of the links, will make playing the best possible for 
the competitors. Handsome trophies will be awarded the victors. 

A tennis tournament is planned to take place on the Potter 
Hotel courts this summer, but the date of this has not yet been 
fixed. There will be a polo tournament on the Hope Ranch polo 
grounds, which have been leased by the Santa Barbara Polo Club, 
either late in the summer or next fall. 



The San Francisco Materialists' Association has an- 
nounced the following programme for July: Friday, July 1st, 
"The Latesl Conception of Matter," by Prof. W. C. Morgan, 
Dept. of Chemistry, University of California: vocal solo by Miss 
Emmabelle Znker. Friday, July 8th, "Building the Empire 
State of the Pacific," by Prof. Rockwell D. Hunt. Dept. of Eco, 
nomics and Sociology, University of Southern California; vocal 

solo by Miss Judith l.'cnseh. Friday. July loth. "'.Vims and 
Morals of Life," "A Religion of Impulse," by Dr. Rudolph II. 
(ierher; 'cello selection by Mr. Masl Wolfson. Friday, July 22d, 
"Antony and Cleopatra," by Prof. Frederick H. Koch, Dept. of 
English, University of North Dakota; vocal solo by Mrs. Amy 
Waters Deane. Friday, July 29th, "Woman — and Women," by 

lion. thy Johns, ex-Countess Von Piontkowsky, a i d lecturer 

on Economics and Sociology; vocal solo by Miss Rosalie Bern- 
heim. Lectures every Frida) evening, beginning promptly al 
8:15 o'clock, Auditorium, Page and Fillmore streets. 



The man of the future sat patiently darning the family 

socks. From time to time his mild blue eyes glan ed wearily 
round at the pile "i mending al hie elbow, and he sighed as he 
thought <d' Murphy, the raw Irishman led in ess u 

struction in the mosl elemen ills of the culinary art. Two 

noisy, sturdy girls romped tom-girlishly ahont the room, aggra- 

his he. ida. he. i\ ImIc le lii lie brother sal quietly 

by his father's side, studyin 5 in an eld bool 

fashion-, which happened as urally to tli 

the little man. "Look, father," he murmured, pointing to an 

old print of the year 1910. "See whal queei clothing tha 

has on. What are they: Did men really wear these, thai!'" 

"Yes, dear." replied his father, laying down for a 

momcnl and bending over the page. "I never saw any, but 
father once told me thai grandfather wore them when he was 
a boy. Thei i died them trousers." — Ex. 



The musicians of San Francisco have decided to 

al musical carnival of last year. The affair will he 
upon a much m ale. The concert hand is 

tited, and all the musical directors of prominence are to 
lend their aid. For those who enjov dancing a hand numbering 
iift\ selected performers will furnish music for that part of the 
e\t. nsive programme. Shell Mound Park has been - 
casion. The date will he .Tulv 81st. Tickets 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St., San Francisco 



Luxury 

Convenience 

Contentment 



Golden State Limited 



Ask about the low- 
rate round trip 
tickets East, on sale 
certain days May 
to September, 1910 



Southern Pacific-Rock Island 

Ticket Offices: 

Flood Building, 882 Market Street, Market Street Ferry Depot 

Third and Townsend Sts., Depot 

Broadway and Thirteenth Street, Oakland 



"A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR- 
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRL IF SHE USES 

SAPOLIO 



;;i; 



San Francisco News Letter 



.1 1 i.-, 



[910 




BANKING 



--Do yon believe in the higher education?" "Not if it 

take? a fellow's mind off too much from f ball practice." — 

Baltimore-A meriran. 

Magistrate (to prisoner) — II' you were there For no dis- 
honest purposes, why were yon in your stockinged feet? Pris- 
oner — 1 'eared there was sicknesa in il"' family. — Punch. 

"Yes." said young Mrs. Torkins, "I am sure "in- garden 

i- going to be ;i success." "So soon?" "Yes, the chickens have 
tasted everything, and they are perfectly enthusiastic." — Wash- 
ington Star. 

"The formei head of the American nation, on a splendid 

dharger, was presented to the Emperor. Then the maneuvres 
began." — (Roosevell before i 1 "' German troops.) — Harvard 
Lampoon. 

The Absent-Minded Professor — My tailor has pul one 

liiittcm too man; on my vest. I must cut it off. That'- funny; 
pow there's a button-hole too many. What's the use of arith- 
metic?" — Sourire. 

"Missus, do you need i hired man!'" "Well, yes, I'm 

looking for a man wiici can do the chores, sweep, clean the rooms, 
be polite ami never be impudent." "Say, missus, youse is look- 

a or a husband." — Ex. 

A woman passenger "ii a transatlantic liner bothered the 

officers ami captain unceasingly about whales. A hundred 

a day she asked to be called if one was sighted. "But, madam/' 

expostulated the captain, finally, "why are yon so anxious : 

tiii,- whale question?" "Because," she replied, "all my life I've 
wanted in see a « bale blubher." — /•.'.'■. 

A young gentleman of tin 1 colored persuasion hail prom- 
ised his girl a pair of long white gloves for a gift. Entering 

a large depart ni store, he at last found the counter where 

these goods were displayed, and, approaching rather hesitatingly 
remarked: "Ah want a pair ob gloves." "How long do yen 
want them!'"' inquired th ■ business-like clerk. "Ah doesn'l want 

fn' tu rent them ; ah wants fo" In buy 'em," replied the Othei ni- 

dignantly. — Harpi r's Ifagazint 

The orchestra was playing the moonlight sonata. "S 

heart." he cried, passionately: "I have loved yon ever sin., 
ni'- a child. I have longed for 'he smri companionship of 

Such a woman as you ever -inn " "Shut up, will vnii!" 

dame a mar from the seat- at tie- rear. "We want to hear Ihe 

musie." "Shut up yourself," retorted the \ g man. "The} ,nl- 

vertise this as a pop concert, ami I'm going to pop or bust." Then 
turning to the lair maiden at his -ah. be began again. — //</<■- 
iter's Weekly. 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



Plan to spend your vacation in 
California's Wonderland 

GOOD HOTELS— BOARDING CAMPS- 
PRIVATE CAMPING- 

Your choice at reasonable rates. 



Conditions are ideal for Rest and Recreation — 

Daily outings to points of interest 
Jolly times around the evening: camp-fire. 
The best of society: congenial companions. 
ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER. ANY 
Southern Pacific or Santa Fe ticket agent, or 
O.W. LEHMER, TRAFFIC MANAGER, Y. V. R. R., Merced, Cal. 




Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits J10.999.654.5C 

Cash and Sight Exchange 9.9S4.501.71 

Deposits ' 24.111.867.07 

Isalas W. Hellman, President 1. W. Hellman. Jr., Vice-President 

F. L. Llpman. Vice-President Frank B. King. - - - Cashier 

George Grant. Assist. Cashier W. McGavln. - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs, Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

IsaiasW. Hellman Wm. F. Herrln Leon Sloss F. W. Van Slcklen C De Gulftne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan HartJandLaw F. L. Llpman J. Henr\ Mever 

I. W. Hellman. Jr. Chas. J. Deering V/m'. Hass John C. Kirkpatrlck 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 
are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO 
B. E. WALKER, President 
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

Th© new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued In denominations of 

$10, $20. $50. $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager. 

San Francisco Office — California and Sansome Streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

626 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1. 200.000. 00 

Capital actually paid up In cash 1,000.000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1.629.978.50 

Deposits. December 31, 1909 38.610,731.93 

Total Assets 41,261.682.21 

Remittance may be made by Draft. Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co. "a 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

, Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m.. except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emll Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier. Wm. Herrman; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary. 
A, H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer. Emll Rohte. Ign. 
Stelnhardt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillman. Jr.. E. T. Kruse 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2672 Mission street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment or deposits only. C. W. Heyer. Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement street, between 6th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer. 
Manager. 

French American Bank of Savings 

SAVINGS 108 SUTTER ST. COMMERCIAL 

(Member of Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

Capital Authorized $1,000,000 

Capital P:iHl-m 750.000 

and Surplus 166,874 

Total Resoun es 5.281,686 

OFFICERS— A. Legallet. President; Leon Rnoqueraz. Vice-Pr, 
.1. M. I 'upas. Vice-President; A. Rousquet. Secretary; John Ginty. Cash- 
ier; M. Ginml Assistant Cashier; P. Bellemans. Assistant Cashier; P. A 
Bergerot. Att< 

Safe Deposit boxes for rent. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 



CORNER SUTTER AND SANSOME STREETS 



Capital, $4,000,000. 



Surplus and Undivided Profits, $1,602,306.02 



STG. CREENEBAUM, President; H. FLEISHHACKER, Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER. Vice-President; C. F. HUNT. Vlce- 
Preildent; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN. Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK. Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex* 
change and bullion. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



1400 to 1450 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 



A Swell Polish for a Swell Car 

Blue Ribbon Cream 
Metal Polish 




It makes any car look swell. 
It's an Emulsion— a thick Oil Cream Polish. Does not settle. 

LEAVES NO POWDER OR SEDIMENT 
For sale by all dealers. Ask or write for sample. 

Use BLUE RIBBON for Speed, Durabil- 
ity, Brilliancy 

See that the label bears our registered Trade Mark 



PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 

FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES 
50 to 56 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 




If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
in your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: :: :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO. 




All yours for $500 Cash 



A beautiful modern home costing - 

A matchless home-site with a splendid view in one of the 
loveliest spots in the Piedmont hills 



$5,000 

$2,000 
$7,000 



Balance in small monthly payments. Your own architect and contractor if you like. 

A clean, square proposition and the greatest opportunity ever offered the man or woman who 
REALLY WANTS a home. BUT only for a limited time— limited also rigidly in number. 

Call or telephone today. 



WICKHAM HAVENS, INCORPORATED 



Oakland Bank of Savings Building 

entire top floor 
Telephone OAKLAND 1750 











Me- 

The 

Egyptian 
Cigarette 
of Quality 

JUCOMAT1C DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

FVRTTY 

♦ 

At your Club or Dealer's or 
THB SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 







DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



%jJ^ uJ^ u4F 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Weil equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 






CAKES 

Puddings, Ice Cream and all kinds of Desserts 
are much more delicious when made with 

BORDEN'S 

PIONEER 

BRAND EVAPORATED 

MILK 




(Unsweetened) 

Best for all cooking where milk or cream 
is an ingredient. Dilute with water to any 
desired richness and use same as "fresh 
milk." 

Convenience, Economy and Better Re- 
sults make the use of Pioneer Milk a 
Valuable Habit. 



Recipe book for the asking while thcij last. 
BORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK CO.. 



"LEADERS OF QUALITY" 
Est. 1857. 



THE KNOBS WILL STOP YOUR SKIDDING 




MORGAN & WRIGHT 
NOBBY TREAD TIRE 

Patent applied for. 

"Throw Your Chains Away." 
Weinstock, Nichols Co. 

569 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Phonea— Market 6000; J 2»11 

" WE SELL CONTINENTAL DEMOUNTABLE RIMS." 



All's Well With San Fran< 



Its Going to be Incalculably Better 



Established July 20, 1S56 



01 Wi®Bm> 




2j±-& 







Pries 10 6nh 



AN FRANCISCO, CAL., JULY 9 1910 



Pir Yin 






The mountain streams are not as pure 
as ^iVieland's beer: Absolutely pure 
in its production, it is maintained at 
the same high standard hy the use of 
the most perfect of bottling methods. 
In fact, the complicated process through 
•which every bottle of 



passes to insure absolute cleanliness, is 
a constant source of surprise to the 
visitors at our brewery. Whether at 
home, at the sea shore or in the moun- 
tains, Wieland's should be your first 
choice. 

^Brewery's Own Bottling-That's Important 





INVESTORS 

Now is the Time to 
Buy and Make Money 

READ 



The Signed Statement of 

WILLIAM IRELAN, Jr., Ex-State Mineralogist 

Regarding 

Pajaro Valley Oil Cos. Property: 

" I would advise the development of the property, as 
the deduction from my examination warrants the belief 
that wells put down to sufficient depth would be large 
producers, as the geological conditions tend to prove that 
oil in large quantities is contained in theunderlyingsands." 



The PAJARO VALLEY OIL CO. 

is now drilling and seeks the co- 
operation of the investing public. 

A limited number of shares can be had 
at 20 cents each, until August IS, at 
which time the price will advance. 



For further information apply 

Pajaro Valley Oil Co. 

400 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Hotel 

Del Monte 

OFFERS 

MORE TO SEE 

MORE TO DO 
Than any resort in the world. 

Subscribe for the Del Monte 'Weekly, a guide to 
things worth knowing, doing and seeing in California 

For rates, reservations, etc., address 

H. R. WARNER, Manager 
Chester W. Kelly. Cily Representative 406 Crocker Bide, S. F. Kearny 4013 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 




HOTELSAVOY 

SEATTLE 

'Twelve Stories of 
Solid Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marbJe. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most re fined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, SI. 50 up 




Make LAKE COUNTY 



BY THE 

Scenic Route 



The most comfortable way to make Lake County is by Wm. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery; easy 
carriages; careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, An- 
derson and Mira Vista, *7; to Adams, Seiglers; Bonanza, Hobergs, 
Howard, Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook, $9. Stages leave Calistoga 
11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at Calistoga. 
Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished when desired. 
Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific office. 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO. CALA. 

Elesrant new fire-proof construction. Service as perfect 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



CLOVERDALE STABLES 

Finest rigs In Sonoma County. Headquarters for Geyser Stage 
Line. Hunting and Fishing parties furnished with horses, buggies 
and guides. 

H. I. BARKER, Prop. 




PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



PARAISO HOT SPRINGS 

CALIFORNIA'S FAMOUS HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT 



The Paradise of Automobilists. New 
Boulevard from Soledad to the Springs. 
All roads from Oakland south are now 
in elegant shape for motoring. The 
new road around San Juan Grade is 
now open to the public Special atten- 
tion given to Week End Auto Parties. 
The natural stopping place for autoists 
en route from San Francisco to Los 
Angeles. Swimmingtank, plunges and 
baths, the finest in the West. Waters 
awarded first prize at St. Louis Exposi- 
tion. Expert masseurs. New reduced 
round trip rates $6.35 including auto. 



H. H. McGOWAN, Paraiso, Monterey County, Cal. 




The favorite resort for tourists, slght-seers. health and pleasure 
seekers. A greater variety of mineral waters than any one place 
In the world. The only natural mineral steam and Hammam bath 
having great curative qualities. We guarantee to cure rheuma- 
tism and stomach trouble. All kinds of amusements. Including 
dancing every evening. Table unexcelled. Climate perfect and 
scenery finest In the world. Good hunting and fishing. Rates J3 
per day and J12 to $16 per week. A new auto and stage road has 
been built from Healdsburg to the Geysers, and on and after May 
15th there will be an auto run In connection with the regular 
stage C. C. Foss. the celebrated stage driver, will handle the 
stage between Healdsburg and the Geysers. For further par 
tlculars address R. H. CURRY. Proprietor. THE GEYSERS. CAL. 



Santa Cruz, Cal. 

The Santa Cruz Beach Company beg to announce 
that the Grill and Cottage City at the Beach will be 
open for the season on May 16th. 1910. 

Automobilists will find accommodations 

Santa Cruz Beach Company 








THE QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

W, H. MARSHALL, Proprietor. Open the year around. Posi- 
tively the finest swimming- tank, mineral springs and plunges in 
this sedtion of the State. Table unexcelled. New and strictly 
first-class management. LAKE COUNTY, CALIF. 




ALL ROADS LEAD TO 

Marchand's 

HAYWARDS 



For years located in San 
Francisco, and for. 8 year*. 
at Geary and Stockton, is 
now located In Haywards. 
Thesame dinners, the same 
service as of old. A cele- 
brated chef has been se- 
cured. Garage attached. 
Gasoline and oils con- 
stantly on hand. Auto for 
hire. 

EDDIE MARCHAND 

Manager 



HOTEL POTTER 

Offers a greater variety of recreation 
and comfort than any hotel in the world. 
Maintaining a standard in cuisine and 
service by which others are judged. 

Potter Hotel Company 

SANTA BARBARA 



HOTEL LYNDON 



1 hour and 30 minutes over Bay 
Shore and Mayfleld Cut-Off. 



LOS GATOS, 



Cal. 




Autbparties 

aov idea.1 
objective- 
raoirvfS . . 

ClubKouse 
©and. Grill 
for "tK&ir 
cowxror't 
Bja.d enfe- 
tednmervt-. 



YOSEMITE 

Camp Lost Arrow ^Yosemite 

Largest Hotel-Camp on the CoaSt. Grounds and 
buildings electric lighted. Now open for the season. 

Cnnfinnl tfrwf a\ Tne onl y Hotel in Yosemite. 
aCnimei nOlcl The "Hub" of the Valley. 
Steam heated. Electric lighted. Open the year 
around. Glacier Point Hotel and Camp under 
same management. For rates or other information 

Address J. B. COOK, Prop., Yosemite, Cal. 

Or Southern Pacific Agents, Santa Fe Agents, 

Peck-Judah Information Bureau 



Anderson Springs 



LAKE COUNTY, 
CALIFORNIA 



The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths In Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board— $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs— Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m., or S. P. train to Callstoga. arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
stage to springs; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare. $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all 
communications to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mlddletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE Best route for «UU» is vi» steamer to Vallejo. thence through N.pa, Calistoga and 
Middletown 




TAVERN 



TAMALPAIS 

SUMMIT OF 

Mt. Tamalpais California 

STAY OVER NIGHT AND SEE THE SUNRISE 



We& 



APPOINTMENTS, SERVICE and CUISINE UNSURPASSED 

Address: "TAVERN OF TAMALPAIS." TAMALPAIS 

Telephone Mill Valley 83 



£ 



Castle Crags Farm 



A delightful place to spend the sum- 
mer among the pines near Mt. Shasta. 
Reopened June 1st under manage- 
ment of 



MRS. W. F. MORRIS 
Care Hotel Victoria San Francisco 



Skaggs Hot Springs 

AWARDED FIRST PRIZE 1909. 
Nine miles from Geyserville, Sonoma County. Two trains daily 
—fare $4.60 round trip, Including stage. Natural hot mineral 
water at a temperaure of 135 degrees, cures Rheumatism. Kidney. 
Liver and Stomach troubles. Baths free to guests. Swimming, 
Hunting, Fishing, Livery, Tennis, etc. Fine orchestra. Table un- 
excelled. Rates $12 to $16 per week. Write for booklet and reser- 
vations to PETER J. CURTIS, Skaggs, Sonoma Co., Cal., or Peck- 
Judah Co., 789 Market street. 



Napa Soda Springs 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. 
L. Hlrsch and M. C. Dillon, Proprietors. 
Automobile service to springs meets three trains daily. Special 
round-trip fare from S. F. via Monticello Steamship Co.. $3, in- 
cluding auto service to springs. A beautiful mountain, health and 
pleasure resort; newly renovated; hot and cold soda baths; new 
electric light service; bowling; livery and auto service; saddle don- 
keys for children. Write for booklet to L. HIRSCH, Napa Soda 
Springs, Cal. For folder and further particulars, inquire at Peck- 
Judah Information Bureau. 789 Market street, San Francisco. 



Seigler Hot Springs 

Best Location in Lake County. 

Natural hot baths for rheumatism, malaria, etc.; wonderful stom- 
ach waters; Greatest Arsenic Beauty Bath In the State; swimming 
pond. Baths free. Rates. $10 to $14. Livery in connection. Infor- 
mation at Peck-Judah's, 789 Market street, or address W. E. 
CATHIE, Seigler, Lake County, Cal. 



Mountain Home 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains; no better place in Central California 
for hunting, fishing, swimming; table unsurpassed; delightful cli- 
mate; stage at Madrone, Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. Long 
distance telephone. Train leaves city at 9 a. m. Send for souvenir 
of Mrs. Vic. Poncelet, Llagas, Cal. Delightful trip for automobll- 
Ists. Information at Letcher's Garage, San Jose. 



CAMP AHWAHNEE, Yosemite 

At the foot of Glacier Point Trail. Opposite Yosemite Falls. 
Every tent electric lighted. The most luxurious camp 

in the Valley. 

W. M. SELL, Jr., Manager 



Gilroy Hot Springs 



12 miles of elegant Automo- 
bile Roads from Gilroy to the 
Finest mineral waters and climate in the State. 
THE Place to Spend the WEEK END 

m. j. Mcdonald, 

Proprietor 



Springs. 



„ , . $12.00 to $17.50 per week 
Kates: $2 00 , $2 5fJ per day 



Agua Caliente Springs 

Nearest Hot Sulphur Springs to San Francisco and Bay Cities; 
2 hours' ride; NO STAGING; swimming tank; tub. plunge and 
electric light baths; cure stomach troubles, rheumatism, liver and 
kidney complaints; every accommodation; reasonable rates. Take 
N. W. Pac. Ry. at Sausalito Ferry at 7:15 a. m. and 4:46 p. m.; 
fare $1.65 round trip. Inquire at 789 Market and 2004 Sutter, or 
address THEODOR RICHARDS, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, 
California. 



Ninety-Sixth Half- Yearly Report 



-OF- 



Savings Union Bank of San Francisco 

WHOSE NAME WAS 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks if San Francisco. 

Temporarily located at N. IF. COR. CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STS. 

The name of the San Francisco Savings Onion has been changed to SAVINGS 

UNION BANK OF SAX FRANCISCO -e clearlv indicate to the general 

public that ii conducts a banking business. AI the same time its identity is kepi 
as the »lil "Savings Union," Hie name by which il has been popularly known for 
nearly half a century. 




New building at junction of Grant avenue with Market and O'Farrell streets wilt 
be completed and occupied before the close of the year. 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities Savings Union Bank of San Francisco, June 30, 1910 

ASSETS, 
Loans secured by firsl lien on Real Estate wholly within the State of 

California ' $12,813,365.16 

Loans secured h\ Pledge and Hypothecation of Approved Bonds and 

Stocks.... ' ' 1,222,654.52 

Bonds of the Municipalities and Scl I Distric - of the State of Cali- 
fornia, Railroad Bonds and B Is and Stocks of Local Cor- 
porations, the value of which is 10,225,803.89 

Hank Premises 700, .00 

Other Real Estate in the State of California 579,632.53 

Furniture and Fixtures 500.00 

Cash in Vault and in Hank 1,350,578.52 

rotal Assets $26,892,534.62 

LIABILITIES 

Due Depositors $24,578,737.31 

Capital Paid-up I, ,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,313,797.31 

Tot .1 Liabilities $26,892,534.62 

3 gni 1 1 JOHN s. DRUM, President. 
Signed I R. M. WELCH, Cashier, 
ribed and sworn to befon dav of June, 1910. 

, Signed) FRANK I.. OWEN. 
\, ! a,. Public ni an, I for the Citj and I mint} isco, stair of Cali- 

fornia. 

Pol the 'ill year ending June 30, 1910, a dividend has been declared at the 

per annum <>n all It-posits, payable on and a 1st. 

\l,,„, ,. i the llih inst, begins to earn interest from Job 1. 



Statement of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

fflBERNIA BANK (A CORPORATION) 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco) 

DATED JUNE 30, 1910 

ASSETS. 

1 — Hands of Ike United States ($9,610, 000. 0U) of the State of California ami municipalities thereof 

($2,581,8;. 5.00), the actual value of which is $14,397,910.89 

8 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver (Join and Checks 1 .iwS.si;; . l 2 

S — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which is 6,428,060.20 

$•'2,181,838.21 

They are: "San Francisco and North Pacific Railway (' pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,000.00), 

"Souther)] Pacific Branch Railway Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" ($266,000.00), "Western 
Pacific Railway Co. 5 per cent Bonds" ($250,000.00), "San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($108,000.00), "Northern California Railway Company 5 per eenl 
Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern Railway Company of California 5 per 3ent Bonds" ($29,000.00), 
"Southern Pacific Railway Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" ($1,000.00), "Market Street 
Cable Company (i per cent Bonds" ($S08,000.00), "Market Street Railway Company First Consoli- 
dated Mortgage ."i per cent Bonds" ($753,000.00), "Los Angeles Pacific Railroad Company of California 
Refunding 5 per cent Bonds" ($400,000.00), "Los Angeles Railway Company of California 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($334,000.00), "Powell Street Railwaj Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($185,000.00), "The Om- 
nibus Cable Com pan v 6 per cent B Is" ($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per cent 

Bonds" ($150,000.00"), "Ferries & Cliff House Railwaj ( ompany 6 per cent Bonds" ($6,000.00), 
"The Merchants' Exchange i per ceni Bonds" ($1,490,00(^00) "San Francisco Gas & Electric Com- 
pany l' L . per cent Bonds" ($474,000.00), "Los Angeles Gas & Electric Co. 5 per cent Bonds" ($100,- 

.""Spring Valley Water Co. 1 per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00). 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is 32,30 1,3 1 1 .02 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is as follows: They are all existing Contracts. 
owned by said Corporation, and arc payable to it at its office, which is situated at the corner of Mar- 
ket, McAllister and Jones streets, in the City and County of San Francisco, Slate of California, and 
the payment thereof is secured by Firs! Mortgage on Heal Estate within this Slate. Said Promissory 
Notes are kept and held by said Corporation at its said office, which is its principal place of business, 
and said Notes and Debts are there situated. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is 15,61 0.96 

The condition of the said Promissory Notes and debts is as follows: They are all existing Contracts 
owned by said Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, which is situated as aforesaid, and the 
payment thereof is secured by pledge and hypothecation of Bonds of Railroad and Quasi-Public Cor- 
porations and other securities. 

G (a) — Real Estate situated in the City and Countv of San Francisco ($257,169.38), and in the Coun- 
ties of Santa Clara ($20,987.74), Alameda ($261.21), in this State, the actunl value of which is .. 278,418.33 
(h) The land and building in which said Corporation keeps its office, the actual value of which is.. 1,025,901.32 
'I lie condition of said Real Estate is that it belongs to said Corporation and part of it is productive. 

? — Contingent Fund — Interest due and uncollected on Promissory Notes $139,558.24 

Interest accmed but not yet payable on United States and oilier bonds 138,006.46 277,564.70 

Total Assets $56,416,740.5 I 

LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said Corporation Owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value of which is $52,587,758.07 

(Number of depositors, ^9,582. Average : unl of Deposits, $660.40.) 

.' — Accrued Interest — Interest due and uncollected on Promissory Notes $139,558.24 

Interest accrued but not yet payable on United States and other bonds 138,006.46 277,564.70 

S— Reserve Fund, actual value ' 3,551 ,417.77 

Total Liabilities $56,416,740.54 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
THE 11 [BERN r A SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

State of California, City and County of San Francisco :ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY and' R. M. TOBIN, being each duly sworn, each for himself. Bays: That said JAMES K. 
KELLY is President, and thai said R. M. TOBIN I- Secretarj of THE TIIBKKMA SAVINGS AND LOAN 

SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and thai the foregoing stal ot is true. 

JAMES B. KELLY, President. R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this lsl day of duly, 1910. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY, Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of Californi t. 

DEPOSITS MADE ON OR BEFORE JULY 11, 1910, WILL DRAW INTEREST FROM JULY 1, 1910 




EaUWUhtd July 20. IBM 



)TBR 

Devoted to the Leading Intereiti of California and tha Pacific Coaat. 





VOL. LXXX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 9, 1910 



Ni. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhil!, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

Ail social Items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

The color line is decorated just at present with the white 

man's best shirt and eke his scalp. 

Where there is so much "smoke'' there is certainly enough 

money since Monday last to start a lively fire. 

— Uncle Joe Cannon, with heat and profanity, declines the 
invitation of the insurgents to stay at home next session. 

Joy-riders usually don't know or care where they are go- 
ing, but experience teaches that they are pretty sure to come to 
grief. 

Now Eeno settles down to the old peaceful order of things 

in which the calm is broken only by the divorce court echoes of 
far-away family jars. 

Millions of American tin cans go to the Malay peninsula 

every year — and there are no corner groceries or stray dogs in 
that benighted land. 

About as soon as mail copies of the Guildhall speech 

reached them, the administrators of Egypt executed the assassin 
of the late premier. 

Melba, one reads, is to draw .$400 a night during an oper- 
atic engagement in New York. The bird in Nellie's throat trills 
ils merry roundelay to some purpose. 

The breeze thai playfi about (lie highest judicial office in 

the United Slates is preparing to be provoked by the finest set 
of whiskers in American public life. 

The record of killed and wounded in communities that 

did not believe in the "sane Fourth of July" is sufficiently long 
lo prove that the fool-killer is no myth. 

Besides the money, Mr. Jeffries brought away from Reuo 

of those quick Nevada divorces granting him absolute and 

complete separation from his reputation. 

The Colonel's vow of two months' silence, and bis fre- 
quent declarations of intention not to mix in politics, must have 
been made when be had his fingers crossed. 

Possibly it is the old spirit of "le revanche" that leads 

Hi.' Paris pipers to amused comment upon the tact that Count 
Zeppelin's airship so early "took lo the woods." 

It was a N woman who took her sister and her 

small son to Reno I" see the figl I. It was merely her way of 
ensuring the lad against becoming a mollycoddle. 

New York's erstwhite "million dollar widow" said the 

other day: "I don't think life would be worth living without 
A newspaper printed her remarks, and a day or so later 
her husband deserted her. It would be discourteous to draw 
any inferences. 



A Connecticut church is to have a moving picture machine 

wherewith the pastor will illustrate his sermons. Thus we be- 
hold art and science become the handmaids of religion. 

Let none shed (ears over the fab' of the "while man 

hope." Jeffries has a suit case full of $20 bills that are the best 
kind nf plasters for physical and spiritual wounds such as bis. 

Boston, according lo an item of labor intelligence, has 

"1,000 union garment workers." Indeed? We had not sus- 
pected that the one-piece article of underclothing was so popular. 

Aviator Hamilton has made the first nocturnal flight in 

an aeroplane, cutting fancy dashes through the darkness, ami 
even chasing a frightened bat. Hamilton is the original fly- 
by-night. 

Feminine critics of the affair at Beno tell us that there 

were not a few women in the audience, and are at pains to com- 
ment that they were not all of the class which speaks of itself 
as "perfect ladies." 

The case of Jeffries versus Johnson having been decided 

by the Nevada court of last resort, how soon may a patient people 
expect a judgment from the court of first instance in the cause 
of Pinehot against Ballinger? 

The champion of the white race may have been "all in" 

at the end of that famous "'fight," but it is observable that he 
saved enough of his strength to pack home more than $100,000 
of his share of the proceeds. 

A New York court has awarded $17,500 damages to a 

young woman who lost one les in a 'bus accident. Just contem- 
plate the wicked mind of the Boston editor who comments, "and 
she wasn't a burlesque artist, either." 

The crackerless Fourth idea has brought out a fireless 

cracker. By a simple pneumatic device it makes a noise like a 
shotgun, onlv more so. Thus the altar of our patriotism shall 
have its sacrifice < i peace and comfort, powder or no powder. 

Lo, the poor Bthiop — his grin is wide enough to be tied 

at the back of his neck; his poekels are full of the white man's 
money; his heart swells with pride of race and color: he ain't 
jus' shush 't he's a-gwine ter speak to no white pussun whut ain't 
propahly interduced. 

A South Dakota prohibitionist, who is the ice monopolist 

of his town, helps along tb .use by refusing to sell ice 

to saloon keepers. This suggests the old song, the refrain of 
which was to the effect that "If you'll let us have the liquor, we 
can get along without the ice." 

Having put Boosevell out of the popular idol but 

with a few ! of hot type, having shown Taft how to run 

ilic Government right, and having brought a mess of libel suits 
-t wicked newspapers that printed what Judge Gaynor 
-aid. Mr. Hearst runs down to Mexico to help his old friend Diaz 
to re-election, and while resting from that latest task, begins 
to make a war between the United States and Japan. This is the 
Hearst idea of a summer vacation. 



E ID) II T © R I A L 



C© 



ENT 



Good Times Talk, 
eok San Fkancisco. 



Business is said to be more than 
usually dull in Los Angeles, and even 
duller than that in Seattle, but just 
try to find any hint or suggestion of 
this fact in any of the news-sheets of either city; just try to find 
a man in business in either city who will admit, even inferen- 
tially, that his town is not moving steadily ahead, that times are 
not good with him and his neighbors. North and South, the 
growing rivals of San Francisco have learned well the lesson of 
commercial and civic optimism. They are practicing as they 
profess. Needless to -say, they are getting results. That is one 
of the things which make up the answer to the question : "What 
is the matter with San Francisco?" 

There is a psychological side to business. It is as important 
with the community as with business. You can make a sound 
man think himself sick by having enough people tell him that he 
looks bad, and when a man thinks he is sick, he might as well be. 
It is the same way with a community, particularly a business 
community: Let enough of the men who compose it wag their 
heads and their tongues in pessimism: let enough of them say 
that times are hard and business bad in their town, and the town 
will believe them. Then times begin to be hard, and business is 
actually bad. Confidence is the heart and spirit and essence of 
a man. So it is of a community, especially a business commu- 
nity. Lack of confidence is the poison that makes panics. People 
with confidence spend, invest, branch out, start things. People 
without confidence hoard, contract, stop things. A community 
without confidence is like a man with a bad liver. It is the 
pessimistic spirit and pessimistic talk that destroy confidence, 
and once destroyed, it needs a flood of optimism to bring it back. 

W 

If every business man in San Francisco, or even a determined 
and active group of business men, would start next week talking 
good times and good prospects, by next Saturday the results 
would surprise them and the town. They would be visible in 
the bank clearings, in the loans and mortgages, in the new build- 
ing contracts, in the realty transactions. In a month things 
would be humming, as, indeed, they ought to be humming right 
now. There is, in all truth, reason for that kind of talk — more 
actual basis for it than a fine-toothed comb would turn up in 
either Seattle or Los Angeles. The only difference is that here 
we have not yet had the ordinary business gumption to capitalize 
and utilize a good many of our natural assets, one of the greatest 
of which is a smiling and resonant faith in ourselves and our 
city. We put up a bad front. On small provocation or no provo- 
cation at all, we put on the grease paint and the habiliments of 
woe, and strew our heads with ashes and make lugubrious sounds. 
All the world comes and marvels at our accomplishment; we ad- 
mit that these wonders have been wrought, "but," we are prone 
to add, "things are rotten. If we don't get the fair, well " 

Ask a man from Seattle or Los Angeles or Portland how 
things are in his city. He smiles a smile of the dimensions and 
brightness prescribed by his local Chamber of Commerce, and 
with unction and conviction, makes answer : "Fine ! Fine ! 
Everything's booming — just watch where we stand when the 
census figures come out — biggest registration we ever had," 
and much more off the same piece of goods. Now he may be 
lying, and be may know that you know it, but the world admires, 
and the good Lord forgives, that kind of a cheerful liar. False- 
hood of that variety has the magical property of turning itself 
into truth if uttered often enough and loud enough. 

Talk good times and make good times. Be hopeful, and realize 
on hope. Business and times may be good in spite of the opera- 
tions of Soursoul, Longface & Co., but never on account of them. 
Commonly they make it bad for the community they afflict and 
for themselves. Commonly, also, they get the first and the last 



word and the big audience — that is, they do in San Francisco. 
It's time to close out this firm. Smile it into insolvency. Out- 
law it with optimism. 

Look at Portland ! That busy, prosperous city ought to build 
a monument to Tom Richardson, dean of all the optimists. Wc 
may not get his like here, for that manner of man is born only 
once in a while. But Providence and Judge Lovett have sent us 
E. 0. McCormick, who would be a Richardson if he were not so 
necessary to a railroad. Give him a lusty chorus, and he will 
teach it the music of progress and prosperity. Let everybody 



Two New States. 



3B" 

The bill granting statehood to the 
territories of New Mexico and Ari- 
zona has been approved by President 
Taft, and all that now remains for them to do to become sister 
States is to comply with the act authorizing the transition from 
territorial to commonwealth organization. Objection was made 
to the admission of these territories at this time because it seemed 
satirical to clothe so few people with the power and functions 
of independent Government. And in fact it does seem a strained 
eifort to create two States, with all that statehood implies, and 
confer such sovereignty upon territories whose entire aggregate 
population is not as great as that of the city of San Francisco 
by fully 100,000, and giving each one of them a representation 
of two members of the Upper House of the National Congress, 
and for the present one member of the Lower House. Still the 
act transforming them into States is entirely consistent with the 
traditions and genius of our Government. 

But this much good has already accrued to New Mexico and 
Arizona : they are getting a larger share of desirable public at- 
tention than ever before, and capital and industrial enterprises 
are "searching out the land," and, too, a new and strong tide 
of desirable immigration can be counted on, even before the 
machinery of statehood is installed. So, from every point of 
view, the admission of New Mexico and Arizona to statehood 
looks like a wise and prudent act. From a strictly political 
standpoint, the future is hazy. The political complexion later 
on will, of course, depend upon the sources and character of im- 
migration. . At present, the territorial legislative body of New 
Mexico is Republican by a large majority, and about the same 
majority obtains for the Democrats in Arizona, but these facts 
give no reliable data to "guess" what the political affiliations 
their first representatives in the National Congress will be. But 
it is enough to know that statehood is going to be the making of 
New Mexico and Arizona, at least to the extent of making them 
desirable locations for new capital, new industries and a new and 
larger population. 

SB- 



Boost the Native 
Son's Celebration 



September brings the Native Sons 
to San Francisco. It is up to the 
municipality and to the citizens to 
do their share toward making that 
celebration an occasion of more than ordinary moment, as far 
as the general public is concerned. The Natives are very well 
able to take care of the affair, as they have proved in many an- 
other of their annual gatherings, but they will not reject any 
co-operation offered them by their hosts — and every San Fran- 
ciscan should feel himself a host when the Natives come. 

The Admission Day celebration two months hence will draw 
to the metropolis a great and a representative crowd. That 
crowd will be made up of the very best California manhood and 
womanhood, and it will come from every community in the State. 
Let us show these guests what we have done and are planning to 
do; let us prove to them anew that there has been no change in 
our ideas of hospitality since they were with us last; let us do 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



our part to make the celebration of 1910 a record-breaker in the 
way of a good time. 

The Native Sons and Native Daughters i will nail us in 

September are of one interest with San Francisco, no ! 
from what section of the State they may come. Each of thi 

itributor to, and a sharer in, the prospi mothi r 

city whose greatness ami importance come to hi ram the 

commonwealth and its lesser communities. It is well I ha I 
partners should personally sue and understand the enterprise; it 
is good for thorn to get acquainted with the people with whom 
they do business; it is vital that they should be so dealt with 
when they come that they will all wish to come again. 

Before the fire there used to be much more visiting of the 
metropolis for business and for pleasure than there has been 
since. It will take such reunions as the coming celebration of 
the Native Sons to get our neighbors back into the habit of 
dropping in whenever the chance is offered. For this reason if 
for no other the Natives should have all possible encouragement. 
If they desire — as they doubtless will — decoration, illumination, 
money, talent, or any kind of assistance, they should have it 
generously and readily. 

Since there is to be no Portola Festival this year, why not 
make the Native Sons' celebration an occasion of general public 
merry-making? The Natives know how to plan and carry out 
such affairs. They are an enthusiastic and energetic and cordial 
crowd. With the whole town helping them, and joining in their 
festivities as far as may be, the three days of their visit can be 
made not less enjoyable than was the memorable period last year 
in which Don Gaspar and Queen Virgilia briefly and happily 
ran the city for the purposes of pleasure. 

SB- 
Los Angeles has again demonstrated 
Don't Have a that she knows bow to solve the labor 

Labor Question. question for herself. Her answer to 

the question is simple enough. It is 
this: Don't have a labor question. That theory the Southern 
city has just put vigorously into practice, dealing with the iron 
trades and the brewery workers precisely as she has dealt with all 
the others that have tried to find in those parts any footing for 
the closed shop principle. 

For proof of the correctness of the Los Angeles theory about 
organized labor the employers and other business men of our 
neighbor and rival point to the conditions of manufacture in 
San Francisco as compared with their own situation. They cite 
also the present status of Portland, both commercial and indus- 
trial. There may be, and doubtless arc, other factors at work to 
bring about the decline of manufacturing here and a simultane- 
ous growth of volume and variety in the two cities named, but 
the Los Angeles people are convinced that the most important 
condition is that of the relation between employer and employed. 
They are determined to keep whatever advantage they believe 
has accrued to them from their adherence to and preso 
of the open-shop principle. 

Organized labor accomplishes more anywhere else in the coun- 
try than in Los Angeles. The reason is plain. Down there the 
prosperity of the community is above all other considerations. 
Tn business, politics and everything else, the first question con- 
cerning a proposition is : How will it affect the town ? Much the 
same question is asked about the man who seeks preferment or 
for whom preferment is sought. If it seems that the proposition 
or the man will do Los Angeles no good, why, then, he or it is 
promptly turned down, sat upon. Long ago it was decided by 
the Los Angeles people that it would be bad for the town if they 
let organized labor gain any strength among them. There has 
been no change in that view, nor is there likely to be while the 
Southern metropolis keeps on growing in population and gaining 



Oun Farmers 
Going to Canada. 



in prosperity, and while other communities — is it needful to 
name the mosl typical of these — where labor is industrially and 
'in keep on mourning about idle factories and 
mills. 

In bos Angeles the term clo ed shop" ie regarded as synony- 
mous with "shut shop." From below the Tehachapi, San Fran- 
cisco is viewed, possibly not without inward satisfaction, as the 
horrible example of what organized labor does for a community 
thai gives it the right of way. Los Angeles is not alone in this 
opinion, Practically all the other Southern cities follow her as 
to labor, with the result that non-union labor naturally drifts 
that way, and the non-union, or, at least, the open shop principle, 
flourishes there as in scarcely any other region in the United 
States. The unions of the North may assess themselves from 
now till doomsday for the purpose of breaking into Southern 
California effectively. They cannot hope for dividends on such 
investment until, industrially speaking, times materially change 
for our neighbors or for us. It will bo long before the camel gets 
his head into that tent. 

5S- 
Washington official circles are con- 
siderably exercised over reports of a 
large immigration movement of 
farmers from the United States to 
Canada. The exodus is mainly from the West and Northwest, 
but it includes farmers of means and experience whom this coun- 
try can ill-afford to lose. An official statement from Ottawa 
says that five hundred American farmers cross the line daily to 
make their home in Canada, and that if this influx is kept up it 
will double the farming population of Canada every three years; 
besides, the Canadian authorities say, this new element is un- 
doubtedly the best farming talent in the world. Moreover, a 
significant thing about the movement is that the United States 
has been losing more fanners to Canada for some time than the 
United States has gained from the whole world. Of course, the 
Washington Government has no power to prevent our farmers 
going to Canada, or anywhere else, but how to make conditions 
in the United States so favorable that our farmers would hesi- 
tate a long time before rushing off to the wilds of other countries 
is the very perplexing question that confronts President Taft's 
administration. 

The fact that so many are quitting their American farms to 
possess themselves of wild land in a wild country, as is Western 
and Northwestern Canada, would seem to prove that conditions 
for farming and stock-raising are so much more encouraging 
there than here that an energetic practical farmer with a little 
ready money would be quite justified in making the change. But 
a thing is happening in connection with the exodus of American 
farmers to Canada that is not at all relished by the Canadian 
Government. It is that hundreds of American farmers are rent- 
ing their home farms on long leases and crossing the border to 
acquire wild land for speculation. The game is to acquire wild 
land, put it under good cultivation, provide it with good im- 
provements, and then sell it at a good profit to newcomers from 
Europe. What the Canadian authorities want is permanent 
American settlers, those who will ultimately become subjects of 
the British crown, and to that end most flattering inducements 
are held out to the farmers of the United States. But the fact 
still remains that something should be done to make our farmers 
too well satisfied with America to even think of going elsewhere. 

35" 

The college paper published under the direction of young 

ladies of Wellesley bemoans the fact that the solitary pair of 
trowscrs in the wardrobe of their dramatic club is about worn 
out. In the interests of both art and morals, let us hope the 
Wellesley girls will take no chances. 



San Francisco News Letter 



Joly 9, 1910. 



A Bay "Pull of Until the down-town streets of San 

Water and Streets Francisco are sprinkled with salt 

Full op Dust. water, there is no prospect of relief 

from conditions that arc physically 
almost unendurable and economically a grievous waste and need- 
less burden.. The suggestions of the News Letter in this regard 
naturally have attracted the attention of the business part of 
the community, which is the chief sufferer, and have been gen- 
erally and generously commended. They ought to be and prob- 
ably will be put squarely up to the civic and mercantile bodies, 
and thus got into line for some kind of early action. It takes 
an immense amount of talk to start any movement for the pub- 
lie good hereabouts. Let us begin to talk now and talk fast and 
loud. 

As an example of the interest taken in the salt water sprink- 
ling matter by the mercantile portion of the city, we quote just 
one of the many letters received by the News Letter from citizens 
of prominence since this journal took up the subject. The writer 
is Mr. Matt. Harris, of the Van Arsdale-Harris Lumber Co. 
Eeferring to the News Letter's publication of June 18th, Mr. 
Harris writes: 

"Regarding your article, 'Sprinkling the Streets with Salt 
Water,' beg to say this has been my contention tor the past 
twenty-five years, to get a salt water system on the streets where- 
by the streets could be sprinkled, and same could also be used 
for fire purposes. I suggested this to the Merchants' Association 
some little time ago to lay the pipes along the line of the new 
sewers which were being built, have them three feet from the top 
of the ground, and the pipes and hydrants could be carried to 
the side-walk, and in this way they could get water for sprink- 
ling and fire purposes. However, the Merchants" Association 
thought it would be impracticable to lay the pipes at this time. 
It <;ould also be nsed to great advantage in flushing the sewers. 
If this matter was taken up with the Merchants' Association. 
I think it could be brought around, as the Association is doing 
a great deal of work of this character." 

Mr. Harris is entirely correct in his strong suggestion that this 
is the business of the Merchants' Association. That is an active, 
progressive organization, enjoying the full confidence of the 
businessmen and thoroughly representative of them. This asso- 
ciation and kindred bodies are doing everything they can think 
of to enlarge the trade of San Francisco. Especially they are 
concerning themselves with ways and means to bring customers 
from the outlying sections of the city, from the suburbs and from 
the nearer interior cities to shop in our down-town district. What 
is the use or sense of attracting such trade only to have it dis- 
gusted and driven away by the dust that flies in clouds almost 
every business hour of the day in that very district? To get 
such trade under the existing conditions would be only to com- 
plete its alienation. 

The present sprinkling system is a waste of money. An hour 
after the watering cart has flooded a street with fresh water, it 
is as dusty as ever. If salt water were used, the dust would be 
caked and held until the sweepers could remove it. The city is 
familiar with the results of experiments made with various com- 
pounds. Any other city situated as this is would long ago have 
adopted the use of the cheapest, best and most abundant com- 
pound ever employed to cheek the inevitable dirt of city living. 
That compound is salt water. An ocean full of it is at our doors. 
A small pumping plant, pipes easily and inexpensively run 
through the sewers, or above them, as Mr. Harris has sug- 
gested — and a few hydrants, with no more sprinkling carts than 
are now in operation, would make this comparatively a dustless 
city. 

The News Letter again urges inquiry and action. This is dis- 
tinctly the business of the Merchants' Association. Gentlemen 
of that body, kindly do something. Kindly begin to do it now. 



Pilgrimages to Oyster Bay, espee- 
Oystee Bay the Mecca, ially by insurgent Senators and 

Congressmen, and by machine bosses 
who count themselves bigger than the party, are the order of 
things these days, and it is not surprising that they all are con- 
strained to say upon their departure : "We have met the enemy 
and we are his." From Senator La Follette all down the line 
of discontents, the sentiment is that the party organization should 
rebuild itself squarely and solidly on what are called the "Roose- 
velt policies," which, if it does, would at once eliminate all 
cause for insurgency or opposition within the party, and give the 
party as a whole as solid and impregnable a front as it ever has 
had in the past. 

That Colonel Roosevelt possesses and wields a powerful and 
far-reaching magnetic force that draws people to him without 
much reference to the distance that separates, is a self-evident 
fact, but it is no occult secret, nor is it an unfathomable mystery. 
On the contrary, the most distinguishing of Colonel Roosevelt's 
characteristics is his sleepless love of country, which subsists 
upon a burning desire to see his home land continually strive 
after the ideal in Government of and by and for honest and loyal 
citizenship. Necessarily, such a character never has time to 
spare from his labor for the public weal to accumulate large per- 
sonal property ho 1 dings. Necessarily, too, such a character would 
ever keep himself within the hard and fast lines of honesty of 
purpose and honest acquirement. With these characteristics go 
high ethical standards for every exercise of the righte of citizen- 
ship and official responsibility. 

Another source of Colonel Roosevelt's hold upon the confidence 
and good will of the people, especially since his home-coming, is 
clearly indicated by what Senators Lodge, La Follette, Bristow 
and many other public men have to say about him since they vis- 
ited Sagamore Hill, most of them insurgents. They all agree 
that Colonel Roosevelt broadened greatly while in foreign land-: 
that he is now less partisan and immeasurably more of a states- 
man; that his grasp of the intricacies of the science of Govern- 
ment is vastly more secure than before, and they all agree that 
the former President is the foremost statesman of America, if not 
of the world. The opinion of such judges leaves no room for 
an appeal. No, the God of the Republic has not left the nation 
without a witness. 



The Italian-Swiss Colony's finest table wine is TIPO 

(red or white.) Why don't you try TIPO ? 




RCHAS.KEILOS S OC 
£KC£Sl/SrV£ _ 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 

There is no trick in selling a man once. Our 
steady clientele conclusively proves that our 
merchandise is absolutely right. Our growing 
business makes it necessary for us to be very 
critical. That's why we get the best. 

SPRING AND SUMMER SUITS AND OVERCOATS AT 

i OFF 

4 



Jewelers Building, PosT. Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




owncrer. 






1 am requested to define just what is meant by the "inde- 
pendence of the press." The phrase implies a privilege to print 
and publish in the columns of a newspaper anything derogatory 
to the character of an individual, not a patron, without, incurring 
a penalty provided by law. To offend a substantial patron is to 
exeite violent conflict with the ethics of the profession. The 
majority of newspapers manifest an unstinted cycophancy, an 
alert and aggressive obsequiousness to their patrons that would 
do credit to an English shop-keeper. It may not be disputed of 
the average journalist that his fame as a toady will far outlast 
his reputation as a writer. Some one once stated that, given a 
fulcrum, he could lift the world, but the power has yet to be dis- 
covered that can lift the newspaper above its counting room. 
The general public will kindly regard all this as a confidential 
disclosure. 

"Satan produces sin, gambling produces sinners; there- 
fore it is the duty of the honest politician to kill gambling in all 
its forms. History has long since determined this. Don't the 
responsible public understand this philosophy?" — Exchange. In- 
dubitably they do not, whoever they may be and whatever it may 
mean; but is this any reason why, day after day- and year after 
year throughout all eternity, the mighty orbs of heaven should 
exhaust themselves in idle play, while a fat man ruptures his 
blood vessels and suspenders in the effort to pump a bicycle up 
a ten per cent grade? Answer me that, you word-chawing coun- 
terfeit of a devil-traducing philosopher! Out upon you for a 
false soothsayer! 

The attention of certain young lady and gentlemen word 

carpenters, who evidently labor with the belief that the imper- 
fections of their native tongue can be repaired bj their ingenuity, 
is respectfully directed to the fact that their lucid complexities 
are not desired by the boss editor of Ibis journal. One such con- 
tribution, just received, reminds me thai I once knew a justly 
celebrated horse-breaker, who could lake in hand the most vicious 

animal and make him do anything but intelligently pull a load 
or comfortably carry a man upon his back. As word-tamers, these 

writers are fully the equals of this man. The] can make a 
word do anything but comfortably express their meaning. 

An earnest, effort is being made in San Francisco to aave 

the guileless element ot our Chinese e from the machin- 

ations of the artful and mercenary te«. A clever set of rascally 

men are making a living ou n credulous sons o Confucius, 

u ho i onfidinglj turn to the White De^ il 

the alluring devices of these dishonest minds. Gambling 

io he a sort ol inherited trait oE the human character, and until 

Jome svstcm can be devised whereby the many may be 

io fleece the few — thus reversing the present method — it should 

!>e Beverely frowned upon by all right-thinking men. 

The telegraph infon these are bard til- 
Mrs. George Keppel, the chief star in the late King Edward's 
circle. Ever since the last interview with the dying monarch 
ill Buckingham Palace, the poor lady has been in bed with two 
nurses and a bad nervous breakdown. One shudders at I 
of poss id the King been spared, anil it had 
been the lady's dear husband who had died. 



There are, unfi . a lew people, prominent in 

San Francisco, « ho acre ,. ! buried out. of sight. 

contemplated for the benefit of the city. These -nee people 
have blocked fair practices and broad thods in pnblii 

. I i ni'ii ] oi the oldest inhale 

holding aloft from all publii enterprises, but always looku 
some undue advantage, some back door by which they can hold 
an "edge." \o one niv.i asi the name of these people: e 

body knows them and expects I" find lh.au outside the fence ft! 
all 1 1 incs. Theirs is not a case of rule or ruin, for they propose 
no plan for the betterment ol business. They feel the advantage 

of enterprise just as much as any of their brethren, but if would 
appear that the habit of a life-time cannot be changed. Like 
a Texas razor-hack hog, they are just mean, "ornery" and obsti- 
nate, and cannot help it. No appeal to their belter natures, even 
in the face of common danger, stands any chance of success for 
the reason that the "better" nature is conspicuous by its absence. 

"The only subject more interesting than love is war," says 

a contemporary. "Prize-fighting is the very essence of war. 
What is the use of denying its interest ?" No use at all, bub, but 
it is just as well to remember that other crimes are just as popu- 
lar, among a certain class, and much less degrading. It is the 
necessity for curbing this attraction that occasions the principal 
item of expense to those who flatter themselves with the delusion 
that they are self-governed. And to the majority of thinking 
people there is as much difference between a prize-fight and war 
as there is between a battle and the thug who, unaided, seeks the 
spoils of war on a dark night at the Park. 

A well-known local aspirant for political honors modestly 

announces over his own signature that be never but once, volun- 
tarily, told an untruth. Is it, then, to be inferred that his other 
performances in that line have been upon compulsion? Or were 
they done involuntarily, as one dreams, or breathes, or sweats, 
or snores? In either case, a remarkable person! Kight sure am 
1, and glad, this person's statement being true, that he never 
gave me the lie, for I am «not one to take advantage of a sleeper 
by accepting it. 

New Orleans is probably ashamed of her attempt to in- 
jure San Francisco by raking over old scandals, and in this feel- 
ing she is abundantly supplied with outside sympathy. There 
arc few communities not afflicted with disagreeable characters 
and experiences. They arc fleas on the municipal dog, and give 

him a tea- or scratching. So far no buhach has been found 

that will kill the vermin. Probably they will disappear when the 
dog starves Io death, but I doubt their absolute extinction. Like 
the Canadian thistle, they survive seven plowings under. 




Freely Flowing, Simply Snowing, 
Without a Fault, LESLIE SALT. 

IN HERMETICALLY SEALED PACKAGES 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 




Being in a serious mood this week — which is but natural after 
the Fourth of July — the Looker On makes reference to William 
B. Bradbury, millionaire, just out of prison. From a hectoring 
old coward, who refused to pay even his grocery bills, one year's 
discipline and labor in the jute mill has, according to reports, 
made something of a man out of this former old miser. He has 
at last seen life, real life, which is feeling, and real Buffering, 
and it has impressed him so strongly that he 'has promised to 
provide a fund of ten thousand dollars for paroled prisoners. Such 
is the moral effect of incarceration and a diet of bread and beans. 
Bradbury now admits that he never knew men or the misery of 
the world before. That means that during all of his life he has 
never lived — simply made money. How many more there are 
like him ! He should have been sent to prison long ago. Selfish- 
ness of this absolute kind should be set down in the statutes as 
a crime and punished accordingly. To prove that a man hag 
done no good should prove him unlit for society. The fart that 
this hard-hearted, grasping old codger came to his senses with 
a year's imprisonment, however, goes to show that short sen- 
tences are more potent in working for the redemption of crimi- 
nals than long ones. Cut too many years off a man's life to spend 
in confinement, and it leaves him reckless as to what he docs 
with the rest of it. A short sentence, on the other hand, is a 
reprimand that in most cases strikes home, and entails no hope- 
less prospect. It is time, at any rate, that some of our judges 
were learning that no man should be given ten years for snatching 
a purse or a poodle. The Looker On desires to confess that there 
have been times, particularly in one lapse when he hoboed a con- 
tinent, when he has felt- like snatching an occasional poodle him- 
self. The only thing that saved them was that the women lead- 
ing them were good-looking. So much for chivalry. 
5 5 S 

So President Taft has shown that he prefers gold to babies. It 
may be a better game, but Mrs. Florence Kelly, secretary of the 
National Consumers' League, does not think so. Can the Presi- 
dent be getting old? When word was sent to him that the 
friends of the proposed legislation regulating child labor and 
the milk supply laws wished to convene with bim, he responded 
with the information that he was obliged to attend a conference 
on State affairs in Central America. Then, Diogenes ! The 
President was seen playing golf! Of course, golf may be a 
affair in Central America, but in this country, under the cir- 
cumstances, and according to Mrs. Florence Kelly, it was a 
heinous crime. How many babies, for instance, might have died 
while the President was taking off flesh during the game:. Ami 
the stork is loitering in this country too much already. Said the 

little red hen to the little red rooster Well, women of this 

country would like to know what kind of a fellow President 
Taft is, anyway. Is he or is he not going to do something for 
us in the matter of babies ? 

v s ■s 

Mrs. Suzanne Ella Wood Dean, the young widow of the aged 
millionaire, John E. Dean, of Chicago, to whom she admits 
selling herself for his money, has written a diary of the trans- 
action. This she intends to publish. As her husband died ovi c 
a year ago, and she is again a free woman, and, through the 
money left her, rich with the price of her sale, she can make her 
confessions public without injuring the old gentleman's feelings 



or her own. The affair goes to show how really cold-blooded a 
woman can be. While thousands of young women in this country 
have married old men for their money, few of them have gone 
so far as to write a diary in connection. And yet such reticence 
may point to no particular virtue or shame. It may be that 
the most of them are not true to their old men. A woman who 
will sell herself in the first place is very plausibly capable of 
anything in the second. Diaries are dangerous; for, giving un- 
limited room for self-pity, a woman may let slip an occasional 
truth in them. And no young man was ever so jealous as an old. 
In the present instance, the lady terms her lonely scribblings 
"the revelation of her soul." It may be — but we have often 
wondered whether some women possessed a soul. From what 
we know of the sex, they generally prefer a bank account. 
V TS S 

So the corn-cure burglar, who has been operating so success- 
fully in the Mission for the past couple of weeks proved to be 
only a boy — a boy who could not find employment. There are 
so many instances of this kind in San Francisco, of men and boys 
stealing because they cannot find work, and there should be, and 
in reality are, so many openings for them if they are honest in 
their intentions, as it appears in the majority of cases, that the 
matter demands most serious consideration, and at the same time 
points to a standing evil that requires immediate remedy. What, 
nine times out of ten, prevents an honest man getting a job in 
San Francisco? The union! Barricading even against its own, 
organized labor in this city grants no opportunities whatever to 
those who do not belong to it. The alternative is plain. When 
a man cannot find work he is obliged to steal. It is time that 
the employers of San Francisco found courage to declare for 
"open shop." 

S S 3 

Because there is nothing a man will not do for a beautiful 
woman, there is nothing a woman will not do to be beautiful. 
She has proven this so long and so often that the pity is that no 
original and daring mind has yet proclaimed housework as a 
receipt to bloom by. With such a form of strcnuousness in vogue 
our divorce courts would probably go out of business, and it 
would be a happy world of men, indeed, so long as their wives 
did not insist on cooking for them as well. But no high-bred 
woman — no matter how versatile her digestion — would dare risk 
her beauty in that way. When all is said and done, the dear 
things know their own failings best and hide them away from 
us. With regard to a sea-sand bath, however — the latest receipt 
of the beauty doctor — there is no hiding, or very little, whether 
there are failings or not. Anyway, there are some failings a 
man does not cavil at seeing. A certain young woman of society, 
noted for her daring, decided to take one of these, peculiar baths 







RSE 

SCOTCH 
WHISKY. 



MACKIE & CO. 
ISLAY. SCOTLAND 



Never in Bulk 
CHARLES MEINECKE & CO 



AGENTS PACIFIC COAST 



SAN FRANCISCO 



July 0, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



ll 



last week — and hied to the beach in her aul with her maid and 
chauffeur. The latter she left at a roadhou<> with instructi 
wait for her. Then she and her maul tramped milee and miles 
— at least it seemed that fax — until they reached a spot on the 
beach so secluded and given over to solitude that even the In- 
dians in their day must have missed it. So far, so good; the 
lady proceeded with her toilet, which consisted of taking every- 
thing off and tying something about her hair. The maid then 
began to rub in the sand — a very pleasant sensation on the body 
if the sand is hot. This was burning hot with the ardor of the 
a f ternoon sun, and the lady lay there sighing in bliss. Maid and 
madam were so occupied, indeed, that they did not hear an ap- 
proaching footstep. The man must have been occupied, too, for 
lie forgot to whistle. He was a good-looking sort, however, 
which was some consolation — and the maid had time almost to 
reach for one of the smaller discarded garments (the gentleman 
forebore to tell us which one.) Then she picked them all up in 
an armful and threw them over her blushing mistress. If Laura 
Jean Libbey were writing this story, she would probably give it a 
melodramatic title like "Too Late." The man by this time had 
passed by, and the horror of it was he had tipped his hat like 
an old acquaintance. Trembling with excitement and indigna- 
tion at the contretemps, the lady turned on her side to look after 
him to see if he were an old acquaintance. He was still but a 
rod or so away. But the man's back only bore a wise look. 

"He cannot know me," voiced the lady irritably. "Surely it 
isn't some one I know ?" 

"I hope not, madam," responded the maid humbly. 

"Then why did he bow?" 

The maid ruminated. "He may perhaps have taken you for 
Eve," she suggested. 

The wind blowing in his direction, the gentleman overheard 
and glanced back with a smile. By this time the lady had re- 
covered her woman's reason sufficiently to scold her companion 
for having let it happen. 

5 5 5 

Between the recent census report of School < Vnsus Marshal W. 
]). Scurlock and that taken last year during the Taylor adminis- 
tration, there is a difference in number of about ten thousand. 
This points to a deficit so alarming that it would seem on the 
face of it that the School Census Marshal must have made an 
enormous error in his reckoning somewhere. As his report lias 
been gone over ami fully verified, however, its accuracy cannot be 
questioned. 

There is still a very decided decrease, according to the last 
census, in the number of our school children. United States 
Census Marshal Baldwin also called our attention to this grow- 
ing condition of things recently, pointing out as the iv;ison the 
great number of childless married couples in San Francisco. 
Scurlock agrees »iiii Baldwin in every particular. And the two 
present an array of evidence that is. to say the least, startling 
and very derogatory to this city. In only one district is there 
as high an average as two and a half children to the 
Verily, the stork must have taken to high life in San Pram i- i, 
and, sleeping out his revels, forgotten his duties. Our bachelors, 
at any rite, seem to forget to marry, and our married couple? to 
have hildren. This sort of thing seems to have become 
with us. and why SO it is impossible to s.iv. Child lite mai 
cements I community as nothing else can. stands for the happi- 
ness and perpetuity of wedlock as nothing else can. and that our 
women should prefer to do without children is a matter for grave 
consideration and reproof. 

If there were more children we would have less divorces. With 
regard to our multitude of bachelors, who. sipping pleasun in 

salaries and incomes, refuse to gel married, it nr_ 
well, in order to bring them to a proper sense of their duty to 
themselves and the race, to enact a - ereby they 



ed — and not too lightly. With so many charming young 

i in this city, there is no good reason that e should 

i in being a bachelor. What we need is American-made 

marriages and babies. As it is only a matter of love, it shouldn't 

In' difficult. The trouble is perhaps that, having tried pleasure 

so long, we overlook the fact that love is the greater pleasure. 

5 5 5 
Well, the "In- Eight," which proved rather a small one, is over, 

and (he grinning gorilla won. San Francis issed some 

sporting dollars and the ignominy of seeing a white man, sup- 
posed to represent the race, beaten to unconsciousness by a hair- 
brained black. The sporting public has had its fill, and the 
grinning black lords it over us all. In short, the public, with 
the assistance of our daily press and sporting writers, who ad- 
vertised all along that the white man had "come back," have 
been pretty well gulled an.d should be satisfied. The promoters 
and the two fighters have made a fortune, each and severally, 
and are doubtlessly satisfied, too. For our own part we would 
have preferred a bull -butchering a la Mexico. After all, a 
prize-fighter is nothing more than an animal, so far as his pro- 
fession or occupation goes. Watching a fine sample of a tiger 
in a local menagerie the other day, we wondered carelessly and 
for a moment how long Jeffries or the grinning gorilla negro 
would have lasted with him. How long! 

5 5 5 
According to Maurice B. Mitzmain, one of the faculty of the 
University of California, we have the champion jumper of the 
world with us — that is, for his size. This is no other than the 
California flea, well known to us all, except, perhaps, the very 
emaciated. The flea prefers to browse on fat most, of course, 
and it is said that he is particularly fond of the hairy — possibly 
through an aboriginal instinct to hide in the brush. But, as 
even old maida are not immune from his canters, it is to be seen 
that he does not at a pinch despise even the most barren soil. 
And whatever company he keeps, he is always the gay philan- 
derer. The accurate information emanating from the Univer- 
sity of California that he can jump thirteen inches at a stretch 
comes with no surprise to us. Guessing, we would have added 
rather ten inches to the estimate, making it twenty-three. For 
the California flea is Hie master of the skidoo. When you grab 
for him he has always just left. 



Pears' 

Pears' Soap fur- 
nishes all the skin 
needs, except water. 

Just how it 
cleanses, softens 
and freshens the 
delicate skin-fabric, 
takes longer to ex- 
pound than to expe- 
rience. Use a cake. 

Sold in every quarter of the globe. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jolt 9, 1910. 




FMlRMll 



<~Uk c6y*. a * B S{at J J!boacs'-S.X~2. 




Margaret Anglin in "Antigone" "I the Qreel Theatre. 

I went to the Greek Theatre a skeptic, a doubter, a pessimist. 
I did not believe that it could be clone. 1 could not see how the 
modern actor could bridge the chasm of centuries, and make of 
Sophocles' play an interesting drama. True. I do not profess 
to be a Greek scholar, and my knowledge of dramatic literature 
of that day and period is very limited. Yet I have been fully 
aware of the mighty obstacles to he overcome, (lie well-founded 
traditions of our own school, and many more and important fac- 
tors that to the layman would make the production of the cen- 
turies-old tragedy a mighty doubtful experiment. I wended 
my way to the beautiful amphitheatre wondering just how long 
I would be able to stand the long speeches of dreary blank verse 
which our modem actor, as a rule, is able lo handle indifferently 
well, and in a majority of instances not at all. I came away, 
dumbfounded; impressed as 1 had not been impressed fur 
The magic spell of it all is upon me yet. Under the stars of a 
cool California summer evening, lulled by the gentlest of whis- 
pering zephyrs, I beheld the enactment of a wonderful drama, 
filled with nobility and loftiness of purpose, gripping tn its re- 
lentless intensity, a story of Buffering and sorrow, human in all 
its essentials, a story of love and death, old as man. What 
amazed me beyond measure was the splendid dignity of the en- 
tire performance. It was a gnat undertaking, one of the very 
greatest, in fact, which our stage of to-day has ever attempted, 
not in point of beauty of production, not in magnificent ensem- 
bles, but made wonderfully impressive by its simple grandeur, its 
environment, and most of all by the magnificent earnestness of 
its participants. And right here I want to state just how wonder- 
ful Miss Anglin was. She it is who has worked night and day to 
make it the splendid success it was. In this play she mounted to 
heights of histrionism seldom reached. She wrapped around her 
the gray shroud of tragedy, and in it mounted to the very pin- 
nacle of greatness. Herein I was again amazed. Miss An. 
a tragedienne had never entered by mind. In plain words, I could 
not believe that she could handle a role of such magnitude 
affording such opportunities as "'Antigone" does. Surely we 
have here a new Miss Anglin, one who is destined to do great 
things in the now barren field of tragedy. She has given splendid 
evidence that she is fully capable of doing serious work, of the 
kind that few dare attempt. In the entire galaxy of English- 
speaking actresses, I cannot recall another woman with the nec- 
essary dramatic strength to carry to a successful issue the role of 
Antigone, unless it is our own Xance O'Neil. Xow that Miss 
Anglin has found herself, she should tread unhesitatingly in the 
path that leads to the greatest roles that the drama affords ; in 
the forbidden realm of tragedy. What a great Lady Macbeth 
she would make! In "Antigone" her voice rang out with thrill- 
ing intensity, filling every corner of the great auditorium. I 
see that one writer states that Miss Anglin and her associates 
were singularly free from the "artificialities of elocution." 1 
am afraid that the aforesaid writer is ignorant of the fundamen- 
tal essentials of pure elocution, and which were so delightfully in 
evidence at this performance, namely, enunciation and articula- 
tion and voice power. In this connection. Miss Anglin and her 
company were the acme of perfection, showing that there had 
been a thorough and careful course of training to meet the un- 
usual exigencies of the novel and unusual surroundings. I u 
one single evening, Miss Anglin transposed herself from a bril- 
liant comedienne into a consummate mistress of tragedy. She 
accomplished as great a personal achievement as our modern stage, 
has witnessed. Within my memory, I cannot recall another Eng- 
lish-speaking actress who could give such a marvelous display of 
her versatility as Miss Anglin did this week, that is, in playing 
two roles like Helena Richie and Antigone. They are at absolute 
variance with each other, each role representing a distinct type 
of work, and in her enactment of these roles Miss Anglin runs the 




Jolly Fanny Rice, who will appear Ihis Sunday matinee at the 

Orpheum. 

entire gamut of human emotions. Tremendous praise is due this 
intrepid little woman, who has dared so much in so fearless a 
manner, and who has won so signal an artistic victory. Again I 
want to mention how specially pleased 1 was with the support 
that Miss Anglin received from her associates. There musi 
have been unflagging energy and zeal displayed to acquire such 
i Kcellent proficiency in the capable manner in which the various 
characters spoke their blank rerse. Eugene Ormond as the King 
fairly outdid himself. It is a magnificent role, from a dramatic 
standpoint, affording as great opportunities as Antigone. Or- 
monde handled the part with superb dignity, and read his lines 
with keen intelligence, lie conscien touslj tried his best with 
a role which was really too great for him, ami which liobert Mall- 
tell, for instance, could make truly magnificent. Walter Howe, 
as Coryphaeus, was clear cut and incisive in his delivery, acting 
his part with a proper understanding of the character. Howard 
Hull as Haemon, son of the king, ■ i- splendid, ami barring a 
rather awkward walk, was u n - rf sfactory, i specially in the big 
scene with his father. John 1!. ( 'ran lord as Teiresiaa, the seer, 
was magnificent, his characterization of the blind old philosopher 
being a well nigh faultless piece of work. Eugene Shakespeare 
as the messenger carried every one away with the fervor of his 
utterances. His sincerity and fine came, mess, his perfect elocu- 
tion and splendid poise made his renditii f a short, though 

difficult role, one of the personal successes of the performance. 
Frances Jordan as Ismene, sister of Antigone, was satisfactory, 
as was Margaret Gordon as the Queen. Percy Anderson, who 
designed the costumes, made desperate attempts to 1„. historically 



Burns Hammam Baths 

Sulphur Baths— Electric Baths 

Eddy and Van Ness Ave. and Kearny and Jackson Streets 

LADIES' DEPT.- Eddy and Van Ness Ave. only 



,U-ly 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



. particularly in regard to the men's attire, h « 
picturesque, though. The orchestra, under the capable dii 

of Dr. •'. Fred Wolle, rendered a good a in of the Mendels- 

sohn-Bartholdj music. The chorus was ragg d in apots and ini- 
even, but Dr. Wolle hold them well in hand. The performance 
moved withoul a single hitch, and the interest of the audience 
was evin ed b) the almost death-like stilluess which settled over 
the great amphitheatre for two hours and a half, mute but splen- 
did evidence of the grip and swaj the actors had upon their 
auditors. It was a magnificent achievement, a glorious consum- 
mation of a worthy ambition, an emphatic and decided success. 
by and through which Margaret Anglin has placed her name 
high in the niche of histrionic fame, a new and wonderful figure 
in the gallery of American dramatic immortals. 



Mrs. Fiske at the Columbia. 

It must he nearlv twelve years ago since M rs. Fiske first gave us 
her notable production of Langdon Mitchell's dramatization of 
Thackeray's "Vanity Fair." It must be nearly ten years ago 
since she made her first local appearance in the play, which oc- 
curred at the old California Theatre. 1 had the pleasure of being 
associated with her at that time; hence, am in a position to be 
thoroughly familiar with the play, and also with Mrs. Fiske's 
performance of "Becky Sharp." Mrs. Fiske, like many other 
stars, finds it very hard to get a successful play which will suit 
her, and in this instance she is obliged through force of circum- 
stances to fall back on one of her earlier successes. There are 
many of the younger generation who have not seen Mrs. Fiske in 
this role, and again many who have previously witnessed her 
performance who will take additional delight in seeing a repeti- 
tion of it. There is no denying that "Becky Sharp" is eminently 
fitted to the personality and temperament of Mrs. Fiske; that sic 
seems the living embodiment of the character, and furthermore 
that there is no actress upon our stage at this time so perfectly 
qualified to enact the Thackeray heroine as this little •woman. 
She has played a variety of roles since she first shelved 
"Reeky Sharpe," but all with indifferent success, "Salvation 
Nell" being about the nearest approach to a real success she has 
had in some years. Of her work as "Becky Sharp" it is really 
superfluous to speak at this late day. We all know that in the- 
character, Mrs. Fiske attains to greatness. It is a wonderful 
study, strong in outline, a splendid bas-relief, her interpretation 
being crowded with little details and touches characteristic of 
Mrs. Fiske and peculiarly her own. "Mow is the time to see Mrs. 
Fiske in this, her greatest role. It is the maturity of her art; 
it sums up completely her immense cleverness. There are many 

who consider Mrs. Fiske as an actress of only fair ability, and 
slide lied they cannot understand her; that she Bpeaks too rap- 
idly, slurring her words, etc. Then, again, there are many who 

claim Mrs. Fiske as our first and representative American actress. 
Naturally, being partial to her, T do not want to enter into a 
lengthy discussion of the matter. A good plan is lo sec the play 
and judge for yourself, and to make i study of her style and 
method, then analyze her work for what it is worth. Her com- 
pany this season is up to the usual excellent standard, Her lead- 
ing man is si ill Holbrook Blinn. who. how, the part of 
the Marquis of Steyne. 1 have seen better performances of the 
part. Blinn. however, ; s -.< mighty conscientious ai tor, and could 
do nothing badly. Tbe pari is nol suited to his robust p 
■ ality. Nor docs he invest il with the deep subtl tinning 
the role requires, nor does he make him the big dominating figure 
which Steyne should be. His pert - satisfactory, though. 
Henri Stephenson, an English actor, is the Rawdon Crawley. He 
is verj good, too, being to the life the bluff, honest English 
trooper, lie was a lucky selection for the part. Robert 1 
sun. who is one of the original "Beck] Sharp" Company, is seen 
again in bis wonderful delineation of Sir Pitt Crawley. It is 

without doubt as fine a character drawing as I have ever seeu. 
a splendid study of a quaint character, fine in detail, a real 
That kcrav etching. All the other familiar characters are in 
competent hands. I know of no other play at this moment for 
which ii is so hard to find actors to competently till the \ 
roles. Each and every one is a distinct characterization. The 
present organization is capable throughout. The settings arc as 
handsome as formerly, th< I being the same gi 

spectacle of mo\ of you who have nevi 

Mrs. Fiske is "Becky Sharp" should not miss her. It is without 
doubt a great piece of work. 




Henrietta Grossman, trim will shortly appear at the Columbia 
in the new farce, "Anti-Matrimony." 

Virginia Harried at the Alcazar. 

In "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray," the play which Miss Ear- 
ned is using this week, she gives an exhibition of emotional work 
whicb is about as fine as anything of the kind that I have ever 
witnessed. The role of Paula is not new to Miss Ilarned, but 
to my knowledge it is the first time that she has done it out hen". 
Miss Ilarned. without question or doubt, (irmly establishes her 

right to he considered as one of our really great emotional ac- 
tresses. It is too bad that she did not do the play earlier during 
her short stay at the Alcazar, as in it she shows her true worth 
as a great artist, and the result would have been that she would 
have aroused more popular interest and correspondingly larger 
audiences. Truth to tell, I never suspected Miss ITaniol call- 
able of reaching the dramatic heights -he reaches in this play. 
T consider her performance in many respects and essentials as 
superior to that of Mrs. Pat Campbell. Miss Ilarned makes the 
baracter human. Her apparent lack id' stage artifice is de- 
lightful ; her convincing naturalness is charming and wonder- 
fully impressive. She does not. .in ;i II over the stage. 

are, a -oh. an emphatic word, mean so much to hi 
iu other words she is able to do so much with the little 
and technicalities of human feelings, [n making Paula human, 
she emphasi of the woman. She shows that 

she is not scarlet by nature. !,\ force of circumstances. 

She realizes that she has sinned, but as she tells herself, she has 
never received any encouragement from anybody to tread in the 
path of goodness and righteousness until she met Tanqueray, 
and then her soul craves love and the right to be a good woman, 
and so considered by the world in general. All in all, it is a 
wonderfully impressive characterization. It is a long time since 
I have seen an Alcazar audience so quiet, so utterly enthralled 




FICTION BARGAINS 
A clearance from the Fiction Library 

PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Our rooms are cordially open to visitors. 

239 Grant Ave., between Porft and Sutter Streets 
San Francisco 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 



that they actually forgot to laugh in the wrong places. This 
coming season, under new managers, Miss Harned is to have her 
first real chance as a star, and her positive success is a foregone 
conclusion. Heretofore she has been placed in roles which did 
not suit her. Now she is to do a repertoire of her best parts, 
and some day some one will write her a good play, in which she 
will achieve success which will place her among the greatest. 
William Courtenay, as Aubrey is not at his best. In the first 
place he looks 23 in the place of 43. Throughout he seems ill at 
ease. He is conscientious, though, and sincerity is the key-note 
of his work. Wesner is fine as Cayley Druinmle. though at times 
he hurries his lines too much, and is given to slurring important 
speeches. Bennison is fine in the short part of Captain Ardale, 
and the same can be said of Walling as Dr. Jayne. Hickman 
achieves a personal success in the despicable role of Sir George 
Orreyed. It is a capital bit of 'character work. Garwood is bad 
as Prank Misquith. He is not of the Alcazar standard at all. 
Nest to Miss Harned, the best work is done by little Bessie Bar- 
riscale as Ellean. In this role she gives a sample of her true 
mettle. It is the finest thing 1 have seen her do since Juanita 
in "The Rose of the Barjeho." This I understand is her last 
week with this popular company. I want to state that no cleverer 
women walk Broadway than Miss Barriscale. Brother David 
should take hold of this clever woman, as in point of sheer ability 
and cleverness and personal attractiveness I consider her far 
superior to Prances Star, and this statement is made with due 
deliberation and a careful comparison of the respective merits of 
both ladies in question. I shall watch her Eastern progress with 
much interest. Good luck to you, Miss Barriscale! Louise 
Brownell and Adele Belgarde are satisfactory as Mrs. Cortelyon 
and Lady Orreyed. The two settings are fine. I sincerely ad- 
vise anybody who may read these lines not to fail to see Miss 
Harned in this play. It is an artistic treat, which we do not 
often see. and I unreservedly and unqualifiedly recommend the 
performance as positively high class and deserving of the patron- 
age of every interested theatre-goer. Do not miss it ! 



Class "A" Vaudeville at the Orpin » \ 



Por the second and final week of Mrs. Fiske's engagement at 
the Columbia Theatre, she will present "Pillars of Society," on 
Monday and Saturday nights and at the matinee on Wednesday. 
"Becky Sharp" will be offered on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day and Friday nights and at the Saturday matinee. 

Henrietta Crossman in her latest comedy hit, "Anti-Matri- 
mony," will be the next attraction at the Columbia Theatre, open- 
ing there Mondav, July 18th. 

* * * 

The Orpheum announces for the coming week, beginning with 
next Sunday matinee, Marion Murray, one of the exceedingly 
popular Murray Sisters, who is this season touring with her own 
company in a comedy sketch called "The Prima Donna's Honey- 
moon." Miss Murray, her company, and Mr. Woolf's merry 
farce, won the unqualified admiration of the New York critics. 

Jolly Fanny Bice, who is "merrily-cheerily-verily yours," will 
present her original conception of "The Miniature Mimic Stage." 

Aubrey Pringle and George Whiting, who have for many years 
distinguished themselves separately in vaudeville, have now com- 
bined forces, and are meeting with immense success. They will 
amuse in a skit called "Breaking into Vaudeville." 

Signor Travato, styled "The Eccentric Violinist," will give us 
a taste of his skill. Travato is said to be a splendid musician, 
whose quality, technique and execution are said to be simply 
perfect. 

Next week will be the last of Will M. Cressy and Blanche 
Dayne, who will appear in a sketch entitled "One Night Only." 

With this bill will conclude Loie Fuller's "Ballet of Light," 
Captain Maximilion Gruber and Miss Adelina's Equestrian Be- 
view, and Miss Lily Lena, the dainty English singer of dainty 
story songs. 



Mr. Setter — What did they put your poor Bruno in jail for? 
Mr. Bull — His master put the automobile license on his collar 
by mistake, and Bruno went out chasing eats, and was arrested 
for breaking the speed ordinance. — Ex. 



A BOY'S LETTER FROM THE COUNTRY. 

"Dear Papa: No good candy up here; send me a box of Geo. Haas & 
Sons' from San Francisco." 

An order can be sent by mail or express from any one of their four 
stores: Pheian Building; Fillmore at Ellis; Van Ness at Sutter; and 28 
Market street, near Ferry. 



PfWYYl O'Farr.11 Street. 
\jwiiv Bet Btockt oB and Pow.ll. 

Safest and Mosl Magnificent Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
MARION MURRAY & CO.. in their screaming farce. "The Prima 
Donna's Honeymoon;" JOLLY FANNY RICE, in "The Miniature 
Mimic Stage:" PRINGLE & WHITING, presenting "Breaking in- 
to Vaude ville: " SIGNOR travato. -The Eccentric Violinist;" 
last week WILL M. CRESSY ami BLANCHE DAYNE. presenting 
for the lirst time here Mr. Cressy'S latest sketch. "ONE NIGHT 
ONLY;" CAPTAIN MAXIMILION GRUBER and MISS ADE- 
LINA'S EQUESTRIAN REVIEW; NEW ORPHEUM MOTION 
PICTURES; last week LOIE FULLER'S "BALLET OF LIGHT," 
and LILY LENA, the dainty English singer of storv songs. 
Evening Prices— 10c. 25c. 50c. 75c Box seats, $1. Matinee 
prices (except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 26c„ 50c. Phones 
Douglas 70; Home C 1570. 



Gottlob. Marx & Co., Managers. 



Miss Lily Lena, a dainty English singing comedienne, made 
her re-appearance at the Orpheum this week. Miss Lena is one 
of the cleverest actresses that the Orpheum has had the good for- , T _. 

tune to present to the public. Her singing of "If You Don't ±\6W (jWfl 
Want to be My Husband. \Y\\\ You Let Me be Your Wife," 
captivates the entire audience and brings forth calls for many 
repetitions. "Have You Got Another Girl at Home Like Mary" 
is another of her favorite pieces, and is well worth the price of 
admission alone. 

Six little misses, pupils of La Loie Fuller, come out with bare 
feet and legs, a la Maud Allen, to perform what is termed a 
"Ballet of Light," in which the electric spot plays a more im- 
portant part than the girls. The girls are graceful, and the float- 
ing gauze on which the different colors are flashed is extremely 
clever. 

Will Cressy and Blanche Dayne are back with one of their 
quaint little sketches, full of character touches and brimming f\\) 'o I WlJv) CI r l'h Onf'VO 
with a shrewd caricature of the rural type depicted. There is 
an immense amount of amusement in it. 

Captain Maximilion Gruber and Miss Adelina's Equestrian 
Review is an animal act somewhat out of the usual order. "Min- 
nie." a three-ton elephant, with a red ruffle about her neck, is the 
principal performer of this turn, and is perhaps entitled to first 
honors. The other animals and the man ami woman have little 
to do. 

* * * 
ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Pursuing their policy of keeping the Alcazar open all summer 
with a "two-dollar" star leading the players, Belasco & Mayer 
announce that James K. Hackett, the romantic actor, will com- 
mence a six-weeks' engagement next Mondav evening in Henry 
Bernstein's drama, "Samson." As it will be the play's first pre- 
sentation in San Francisco, and as Mr. Hackett has not appeared 
here within the last dozen years, the event is of twofold import- 
ance. Supporting Hackett will be Miss Beatrice Beckley, a 
young English actress who was his leading woman last season in 
New York, and Arthur Hoops, a player of "heavy" roles who 
has been with him several years, with the regular Alcazar players 
rounding out the easts. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phone FTanklin 160. 
Home C C78I. 



Second and last week begins Monday night, July 11th. Harrison 
Grey Flske presents 

MRS. FISKE 

and the Manhattan Company. Mondav and Saturday nights and 
Wednesday matinee. PILLARS OF SOCIETY. Tuesday, Wednes- 
day. Thursday and Friday nights and Saturday matinee, BECKY 
SHARP. 
July 18th — Henrietta Crosman in "Anti-Matrimony." 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and Stelner Streets. 
Phones— West 1400. Home 8. 



Belasco and Mayer, Owners and Managers. 

Week commencing Monday evening. Julv 11th. the distinguished 
American actor. JAMES K. HACKETT. supported t>v BEATRICE 
BECKLEY. ARTHUR HOOPS and the Alcazar Players, in Henri 
Bernstein's powerful drama. 

SAMSON. 
Its first presentation in San Francisco. 

Prices— Night. 15c to $1; matinee. 25c. to 50c Matinee Saturday 
and Sunday. Seats for sale at box-offlce and Emporium. 



Savoy Theatre 



McAllister Street, 
Above Market. 

TO-LET 

By the afternoon, evening or week, till August 1, 1910. 
Apply at theatre office daily, from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



Jll.Y 9. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



Lfi 




Mrs. Fiske, now appearing at the Columbia Theatri . 



THE "BLIND" TAX. 

There are mar i tattoo in rogue in 

thai do no! appeal i I deral Stat I iun1 01 Citj 

taxes. We are alwayt payinj e sorl of blind tax, .-mil one ol 

iln' greatest German sociologists of the day is authority for the 
statement that we are pa) ing a al ion per capita than 

any nationals ( on earth. 

In an article in the "Berliner Tageblatt," be says thai ure are 
the most improvident people on earth, lie rites the many ''Ian' 
days" as a new and malicious form of "blind" taxation, ami lie 
says that tag day is the direct result ni' bail Government. lie fur- 
ther slates that the labor unions in this country have established 
a rival Government, and that there is also a Government by tin' 
rich. He slates that the tax levied on labor by the labor I nisi 
is something enormous. Citing I he advance in the wage paid 
union secretaries, lie mentions the case of one union, 
where, ten years ago, the secretary was willing to labor en- 
thusiastically for ten dollars a monih for the "love of the cause." 
where to-day the official holding the same position is receiving 
ime hundred and fifty dollars a month. 'Pen years ago that sec- 
retary was willing to take his books home and do the job, after 
hours. To-day, he sits in a sumptuous office and makes his fel- 
lows wait in line outside. Herr Bernsreiter tells of the head of 
a labor union who has "saved" more than five hundred thousand 
dollars, in the space of five years. This man is not the head of 
a single union, but is at the head of a combination. 

The enlightened German goes on to state that every kind of 
"blind tax" is resorted to, to meet the enormous salary de- 
mands, and the unnatural expenses attendant on extravagant 
union management. He cites the fact that the membership in 
some unions is much lighter, and that those that remain less en- 
thusiastic than of yore, and he also says that, having taken the 
nature of a trust, labor now aims to make of the unions close 
corporations,, by making membership very costly; some unions 
asking as much as one hundred to one hundred and fifty dollars 
as an initiation fee. 



During the cereal year which closed the first of this week, 

the wheat shipments by water Erom Puget Sound ports exceeded 
by 88i,721 bushels the shipments during the year preceding, the 
figures for the season of 1909-10 being 7,598,033 bushels, valued 
al $7,428,934. Of this amount. 2,717,663 bushels came to Cali- 
fornia, which is a strong plea to the California farmer to under- 
take wheat growing, which may be done profitably in manv parts 
of this State. 



Ned Greenw&y, it is reported, is rehearsing strange dances 

and costumes in Gay Paree for importation to amuse American 
society. If Ned can go the Apache gyration one better on this 
side, he will be a most popular fellow. Perhaps he is even learn- 
ing (he strange steps himself, instructed by Mime charmii 

of a soubrette- if b Boubrette could possibly teach Ned anything. 

Let us hope, at any rate, that he will come home to us net too 
thin ami love-worn from the atrenuousness of Parisian life. I" 
L 0Be bi a perfect, voluptuous swelling Eigure abroad would be 

1. ;u m: too much for Europe. And the loss to this country would 

De eq Ua could till up his sagging i 

with contraband goods fee his many lady friends — but that 
wouldn't he Ned. however much it might be like him. 
the costumes to his new dan atoms officials are not likely 

io bother him with regard to them, unless he or the soubrette 
wear them. lie could probably conceal them all in his hip 

pocket. 



America owes 'be rest of the world in trade and money 

ling above $6,000,000,000. Even at that, our credit 

not seem to be worrying much. They haven't as yet go! 

polite "Please Remit" stage of collection, so we may very », 
having what we like charged and sent home. 




16 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jdly 9, 1910. 



^CffiTX 




^f 



There was not 'a little betting on the fight in the aristocratic 
confines of San Mateo County, and as a result there has been a 
depletion of silk stockings and gloves in the popular sizes. The 
fair sex came out ahead, owing to the black champion, li was 
not because the ladies hurrah for bending the color line, much 
less breaking it, bul there is a natural feminine disposition to 
take the opposite side of an argument. The men all rooted for 
Jeffries and put up their coin for him, so the women wagered 
contrarywise. I was in a shop on Tuesday morning, and saw 
Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Mountford Wilson 
and Mrs. Lansing Kellogg cash in a few of their orders. '"It's 
been a busy morning for .gloves and silk hose," said a sales- 
woman. "One lady from Fair Oaks came in and bought two 
pairs of gloves which she had won' from her husband. Xot ten 

minutes after she had left, her husband c in and wrote oul 

a glove order for one dozen pairs. We were curious to see who 
the lucky winner would be, and that very day she came in and 
cashed the order. Believe me, she is better known al the Prin- 
cess Theatre than in Burlingame." 

© © © 

If you lost a good blonde switch for which you had paid $50 — 
a switch that matched your own hair so beautifully that yon 
could convince any one that li was not « ished on, whal would you 
do about it? The other day a luxuriant blonde switch was 
tacked to the bulletin hoard of the station at Ross Valley with a 
"Found on the road to Lagunitas" card securely attached. I. 
passer-by gave it a curious glance, the brunette women linger- 
ing longest, of course, because they knew they could not be sus- 
pected. A young man was likewise observed gazing long and 
pensively at the detached hirsute glory. He is not a "villager," 
but a mueh-courted member of the aristocratic set which keeps 
the air at Boss slightly frappe all the time. Likewise he has not 
been paying marked attention to any of (lie girls in the village 
set, but has been the devoted eavali c of the haughtiest of hami 
ton maidens, she of the red-gold hair. Hist! the amateur di 
teetive can easily strike an attitude, for every golden gleaming 
hair is a clue. There is only one girl in the valley with golden 
hair that always looks as though it had been shampooed in a 
flaming sunset. And she is won! to take horseback rides with 
said young man now asleep, or at least dreaming, at the s 
A favorite gallop is up Lagunitas way. Oh, the clues are as 
long and fine and silky as the hair itself, and the young man 
sadly and wisely jumps on the train just as it is pulling out. A 
little later a neat, middle-aged woman calls and delivers a note. 
She walks off with the switch at a time when the station is just 
about deserted. Is that what you would do about it ? I fancy so, 
if you belong to the class with a maid to fetch and carry. By 
the time the young man had returned from a hard days' work 
clipping coupons in the city, the girl was sitting in her little 
runabout, a glistening braid scattering little mods of golden 
sunshine like an aura around her head. Of course, no one knows 
what she said to him on the way home. But this I know, that his 
eye first lit on her. and then traveled Lightningward toward the 
place where the switch had hung, and in a fraction of a glanct 
he noted that the switch had found a happy home elsi ivhi re 

e © e 

Apropos of hirsute adornments, the mustache is growing in 
favor with the younger set. Templeton t ■ - worn" one 

with a Hoch der Kaiser turn all winter — it is an abbreviated 
form of the Kaiser's mustache, but the upward turn is just as 
smoothly manipulated. Sam Hopkins has also come home from 
Europe with a little "coax me" down that mav grow up into a 
fine mustache, and the other chops have put in orders lor all 
the unguents and irritants guaranteed to make two hair, flourish 
m place of one. 

© © © 

The Draper family has furnished not a little to the summer 
budget of gossip. The divorce ,-,r the Colonel and his wife, after 
a quarter of a century of married happiness-, the marria ■ oi 
Dorothy Draper into the Navy; the postponement of Elsa 



PALACE HOTEL 

Entirely rebuilt since the fire. The 

MUSIC m THE COURT 

during and after dinner 
is a feature of the city 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

The largest hotel company in the world. 
Also operating the palatial 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



Draper's marriage to Midshipman Kaufman because he failed 
to pass his examinations — these and a few incidentals gave a 
spicy tang to the bulletins issued from the Draper menage 
at San Rafael. Now comes the news that Morgan Draper is 
working as a lumberman at one of the mountain camps of the 
Hammond Lumber Company. Young Draper might have gone 
into the Service, or into an insurance office or a bank, like all 
the rest of the sprigs of well-connected families. l:mt lie preferred 
to work as common lumberman. Like young Theodore Roosevell 
who learned the carpet business from the yarn up, Draper wants 
to he a lumber king some day. and so he is beginning from log- 
ging up. And his mother and sisters are very proud of Morgan 
and the callous olaces on his hands. 
© © © 

Friends of the family tell me that Hose Hooper Plotner, the 
miniature painter, only brought suit for divorce when her family 
refused to further countenance Plotner, and what is more im- 
portant, to pay the family hills. Mrs. Plotner is a successful 
miniature painter, bul her talent was not sufficiently remunera- 
ive i" pay for her husband's g I cigars. Major Hooper op- 
posed the marriage violently in the choleric fashion of a Major 

in the drama: he sent Pose abroad io Invak oil' the match, bul 

neither threats nor absence availed. Since her father's death, 
her stepmother has been the financial backer of the mi nage, 

which consisted of a studio that also had to work as a home. Bul 
finally Mrs. Hooper called quits, and Mrs. Plotner agreed to the 

divorce proceedings which Inne I n urged for four or five years. 

© © © 

Mrs. Ralston White is preparing a bride's hook, which is 
indeed a novelty. It will be filled with photographs and com- 
ments on the horseback trip which thej took for their I iy- 

moon. like the couple in the "Virginian." they galloped away 
into horizonland, only they were accompanied by the brother and 
sister of the bride. Altogether it was the most unique trip the 
treacle moon has inspired in many a day. and the little book 
should be a gem. The match-makers insist that Miss Boericke, 
the bride's twin sister, has an engagement ring which she wilt 
soon display. 

* * * 

Friends of the Goodyear and Kirkman families, go prominent 
in San Francisco, are delighted to learn that the Kirkman child- 
ren have been given into the custody oi the two families, owing 
to the compromise of a suit recently brought in Solano County 
by George A. Knight. There is a very curious story involved in 

this suit. Main- prominent people will remember tin' marriage 
of Ethel Kirkman to Milton W. Kirk, a millionaire soap nianii- 



WEDDING PRESENTS AT 
NATHAN-DOHRMANN COMPANY'S 

This store is famous for the beauty and 
individuality of its offerings for bridal gifts. 
Most of them are obtained abroad by our 
representatives and are selected from the best 
workmanship of France, Germany and 
England. 

NATHAN-DOHRMANN COMPANY Chi "l<£K r r"" d 
UNION SQUARE, GEARY AND STOCKTON STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO 



v 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



factum of Chicago. Ethel aaid she ohoso him n i( was 

■ j liable of tin' with his bo ip 

and keep all tin' initials in her linen uni ed. B 
round that all Hie soap in the factor; woultln wash their family 

lean, so she took il into the ih ■> i il lined .1 

eps ration. 

In the meantime, her brother, Captain Kirkman, had married 
the daughter of Andrew Goodyear, of rubb fame. In 

1900 lie got into trouble in the Philippines, and onlj the most in- 
dustrious wire pulling saved his commission. Five years later, 
he was sentenced to sen ice in the military prison at Fori Leaven 
worth for despoiling the home of a limthrr ullinT. After his 
release he disappeared, and is now probably in the never-never 
tropics, where disgraced men eke out a miserable existence. Mrs. 

Kirkman and her two children moved l" the Goodyear I at 

Benieia, where they remained until the sorrowing wife died not 
long ago. 

As soon as she heard of the death of her sister-in-law, Eth '1 
Kirkman Kirk renounced her intention of entering for life the 
Chicago convent in which she was already a novitiate, [nstead 
she came to San Francisco and brought suit in Benieia for the 
custody of her brother's two children. That suit has now been 
compromised, and she gets the care of the boy, while the girl goes 
to the mother's side of the family. 



The brilliant notion that to paralyze Portland's and Los 

Angeles' iron trades would benefit the whole coast, seems to be 
the idea uppermost in the minds of the labor chiefs. This is an 
economic fallacy. To drive all manufacturing from the coast 
will benefit no one, except the Eastern manufacturer, and the 
men in the iron trades will eventually suffer the most. To give 
in to the labor council even in the slightest would place the 
Southern and Northern cities in exactly the same position as 
San Francisco, and that is the position of a non-combatant, be- 
cause of inability to compete in the industrial race. What ad- 
vantage is to accrue to any one, except the labor leaders, by these 
methods, it is impossible to decipher. The labor leader makes 
the money he afterwards invests in real estate only in times 
when labor is at war with capital. At those times, labor loses 
money that is never recovered, and capital loses money that is but 
very slowly recovered. It has taken the astute heads of the 
labor council in San Francisco to evolv-e a new principle in eco- 
nomics, to the effect that the man with paralysis of one arm is 
better oil' if paralyzed in the other arm and in his legs. It is 
just such an equalizing process they are trying to apply to San 
Francisco and 1 he whole coast. 



CANDY IN THE COUNTRY. 



If your supply ei candy runs out while your vacation, you needn't 

go "Candy-Hungry." Just Bend a mone3 order to Geo. Haaa & Sons', 
Phelan Building store, and the candy win be Immediately shipped to 
you. carefully packed, so as to arrive In perfect condition, 



DRESS YOUR HAIR WELL 

The New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors at 
130 Geary, near Grant avenue, are equipped 
with all European and up-to-date appli- 
ances for Hair Dressing and Manicuring. 
MRS. A. W. FINK 

Has had extensive and varied experience 
in European and Eastern Hair Dressing Par- 
lors and has introduced many new ideas. 

SPECIAL, FOR THIS WEEK ONLY, 

Great Sacrifices in 31 and 4 ounce, 36-in. Switches 

Parisian Nail Bleach, fS^t^^nas^ 

Try a course of scalp treatments by our well known 
specialist. Given by the Therapeutic System. 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK— Ten Treatments, $5.00 

New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors 

130 GEARY STREET 



VICTIMS OF 0BE8IT1 . 

>/ Borne in Comfort, 
is a 

BO rapid is 1 

are si iidiouslj temperate in eal ing, etc. The e 
lj a predisposition thai way, and neglect onlj tends to 
confirm it. The remedies tried maj have grievously disappointed 



I [ere is one that will lo bo, and \ aj get the in 

ient at youi druggist's and mis them yourself without trouble: 
Ask for ! L . oz. Martnola, ' L . oz. Fluid Extract Cascara Aro 

and ;!!._> oz. Peppermint Water. Shake together in a good-sized 

clean bottle. Simphj take this mixture after each meal and at 
bedtime, one teaspoonful to the dose, and give yourself do further 
trouble; the superfluous fa I will subside with wonderful rapidity. 
Dieting need not worry you in the least, nor is violent exercis- 
ing at all desirable. Wasting methods of weight reduction are 
not natural. Try the pleasant treatment above prescribed for 
a week or so. and you will he. fit, strong and free from all bodily 
discomfort, besides having regained correct weight and a shapely 
figure. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF JAMES "WOODS 

The farthest 
advance of 
science in 
service 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

A comfortable, high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN. formerly manager of St. 
Dunstan's. 



Hotel Von Dorn 

242 Turk St., San Francisco 

REMODELED AND UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



Telephones: Franklin 3666 
Home C 3666 



Rates: European $1.00 and up 
American $2.50 and up 



Geo. A. Eastman. Manager 




WOLF & ISENBRUCK, Dealers 

THE LIGHT TOUCH VISIBLE MONARCH 

TYPEWRITER 307 Bush Sl.. Sin Francisco 

Pacific Telephone Douila; 4113 
Home Telephone C 2519 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 



§®<ski m<& IP@ir§@iB<aiH Sterns 



ENGAGEMENTS. 
Restarick- Withington. — The engagement of Miss Constance Restarick, 
daughter of Henry Bond Restarick, Bishop of the Hawaiian Islands, 
and Mrs. Restarick, to Paul "Withington, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. L. 
Withington, of Honolulu, is announced. 

WEDDINGS. 

Barnes-Shea. — June 27th.— Miss Lorena Florence Barnes, daughter of Mr. 

and Mrs. W. F. Barnes, of Mill Valley, and William Shea, Jr., were 

married "Wednesday evening, at the bride's home. 
Nelson-Salazar. — July &th. — Miss Alice Nelson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 

James W. Nelson, and Jose Mariano Salazar, took place at the home 

of the hride's parents in Oakland, on July 5th. 

WEDDINGS TO COME. 
Simpson-Pike. — July 12th. — Miss Edith Simpson and Mr. Roy Pike's mar- 
riage will take place July 12th at the bride's home. 

LUNCHEONS. 

Pillsbury. — Mrs. Horace D. Plllsbury gave a luncheon at the Francesca 
Club on Wednesday. 

Voorhies. — Mrs. Alfred Hunter Voorhies and her daughter. Mrs. Kate 
Voorhies Henry, entertained, June 2S>th, at a luncheon in honor of 
Secretary of War J. M. Dickinson and his charming wife. Luncheon 
at the Cliff House was followed by a whirl through the Park in au- 
tomobiles. 

CARDS. 

Furnival. — Mrs. Elizabeth Furnival entertained on Tuesday in honor of 

Miss Marie Lundeen. 
Reams. — Captain and Mrs. James D. Reams entertained the Presidio 

Bridge Club at their quarters recently. 

RECEPTIONS. 
Leninger. — Mrs. Clarence Leninger. on Thursday, in honor of Miss Marie 

Lundeen. 
Schroeder. — Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Sehroeder, last Saturday, celebrated their 

silver wedding at their home in San Carlos, assisted by Reverend and 

Mrs. David Crabtree, daughter and son-in-law. 

TEAS. 

Lundeen. — Miss Marie Lundeen, fiancee of Lieutenant Edward E. Prit- 
chett, U. S. A., was the complimented guest at an elaborate tea on 
Thursday at the Presidio, when Mrs. Charles Lininger and Mrs. Cole- 
man Nockolds entertained from 4 until G o'clock. 

Lee. — Mrs. Cuyler Lee, who is spending the summer at Del Monte, gave a 
tea at Pebble Eeach on June 29th. 

DINNERS. 
Sulivalo. — Mrs. Adrian Sulivalo entertained a number of guests at dinner 
Saturday evening at her attractive home on Green street, in honor 
of her father and brother, who have just returned from an extended 
trip abroad. 

MOTORING. 
Adams. — Mrs. Lawson Adams leaves July 14th for a trip to Los Angeles 

in her new car. and will drive it herself. 
Cluff. — Mr. and Mrs. William Cluff leave on the 15th for a trip through 

the southern portion of the State. 
Healy.— Mr. and Mr?. William IT. I-Iealy are enjoying a motor trip through 

Lake County. 
King. — Frank B. King, Miss Genevieve King and several friends enjoyed 

a trip to Mt. Hamilton. 
Lovell. — Mr. and Mrs. Mansfield Lovell, Miss Minerva Lovell, Masters 

Mansfield Hathaway and Joseph Lovell, have returned from their 

motor tour through Lake County. 
Spencer.— Mr. and Mrs. H. McDonald Spencer motored up from Menlo 

with a party of friends to witness the performance of "Antigone" in 

the Greek Theatre on June 30th. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

Cool. — Dr. and Mrs. Russell Cool entertained guests over the holiday week- 
end at Dottswood, their attractive country home near Los Gatos. 

Crocker. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crocker have returned from Del Monte, 
and are at their home at Belvedere, where they entertained a house 
party over the Fourth. 

Dutton. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton had as their house guests at 
Burlingame recently Mr. and Mrs. Emory Winship, of Georgia. 

De Pue.— Mrs. Edgar de Pue and Miss Elva de Pue entertained a house 
party over the 4th at their Sacramento ranch. 

Hopkins. — Miss Florence Hopkins entertained a dozen friends at her home 
in Menlo, at a house party over the week-end. 

Josselyn. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Josselyn entertained a large party over 
the week-end, which included Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Rathbone, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. McDonald Spencer, Miss Linda Cadwalader and Bttore 
Avenali. 

Lent.— The Eugene Lents have assembled a congenial company of friends 
around them at Castle Crags this summer. Mrs. Lent's eldest daugh- 
ter, Miss Maurice Russell, is the center around which the gayety of 
the season is revolving. Among her young friends who are enjoying 
the summer vacation with her this year are Miss Elizabeth Shreve 
Miss Emily Tubbs, and Miss Will O'Brien. 

Scott.— Mrs. Henry T. Scott entertained a large house party at her Bur- 
lingame home in honor of Miss Goss of London. 



Tillman. — Mrs. Fred Tillman and Miss Agnes Tillman entertained sev- 
eral friends at their Aptos home over the Fourth. 

Wheeler. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler and Miss Olive Wheeler 
had a large house party at their home on the McCloud over the 
Fourth. 

ARRIVALS. 

Ainsworth. — Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Ainsworth and Miss Ains worth arrived 

from a trip to the Orient on Saturday, and after a brief visit in San 

Francisco will return to their home in Portland. 
Armsby. — Mr. and Mrs. James K. Armsby and Miss Mary Armsby arc 

at their Ross Valley home for the summer. 
Boyd. — Mr. and Mrs. John F. Boyd and Miss Louise Boyd reached San 

Francisco July 1st from New York, where they spent a week at the 

Hotel Belmont on their arrival from Europe. 
Barry. — General and Mrs. Barry and Ellen Barry to Fort Mason after 

Yosemite trip. 
Clover.— Mrs. Richardson Clover and Miss Dora Clover have arrived from 

Washington and Joined Captain Clover at their ranch in Napa 

County. 
Currier. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Currier, after a delightful trip to Aus- 
tralia and Sandwich Islands, returned home last Saturday. 
Davis. — Mrs. Robert Davis, Miss Constance Davis, Mrs. Laura Rae and 

Hall Rae returned to their home in Ross on Thursday, from the Yo- 
semite Valley. 
Felton. — Mrs. W. W. Felton is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Prentiss Cobb 

Hale, and they will shortly leave for Castle Crags. 
Grace. — Francis J. Grace, after a year's absence in Europe, has returned 

to his home. 
Gwln.— Stanford Gwin has arrived from the East. He will be the guest 

of his sister, Mrs. James Follis, in San Rafael, during the greater 

part of his stay. 
Hale. — Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Hale, of Santa Barbara, spent several days 

recently at the Palace, and are now guests of Mr. and Mrs. Selah 

Chamberlin in San Mateo. 
Harber. — Admiral and Mrs. Giles N. Harber and Lieutenant and Airs. 

Samuel Graham, have returned from trie Yosemite. 
Kate. — Mrs. Frances S. Kate has returned from Cazadero. 
King. — Mr. and Mrs. Homer King are expected home from Oregon to-day. 
Kierstedt. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Kierstedt have returned from the East, 

and are at their new home in Lincoln. 
Lee. — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lee were recent guests at the Hotel St. 

Francis. They were entertained at a series of luncheon and dinner 

parties. 
Milton. — Mr. and Mrs. Taliaferro Milton are expected to arrive within a 

few days from their home In Chicago, and will be the guests of Mrs. 

Milton's mother, Mrs. James Wilkins. In San Rafael, for the summer. 
McBean. — Mr. and Mrs. Athol McBean have returned to their home In 

this city after an enjoyable visit with friends down the Peninsula. 
McGaw. — Mr. and Mrs. John McGaw have returned from Castle Crags, 

where they spent the past few weeks with their children. 
Metcalfe. — Mrs. Martin Kellogg Metcalfe, wife of Lieutenant Metcalfe, 

TJ. S. N., recently arrived from San Diego, and is at present the guest 

of her mother, Mrs. Menefee. at Mare Island. 
Pierce. — Frank Pierce, with his two daughters. Miss Franc and Miss Mil- 
dred Pierce, returned on Monday from their visit to Yosemite. 
Reding.— Mrs. William Reding, with Miss Mildred and Miss Lillian Whit- 
ney and Mr. Ernest Still man of New York have returned from a 

month's visit to Yosemite. 
Wilbur. — Mr. and Mrs. Albert Harper Wilbur have returned from the 

Yosemite after a month's trip. 

DEPARTURES. 

Butters. — Miss Marie Butters leaves for Colorado Springs to visit her 
sister, Mrs. Victor Metcalf, Jr. 

Brown. — Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln Brown and Albert Brown have 
gone to Lake Tahoe, where they will spend the month of July. 

Brown. — Mrs. Philip King Brown and children have gone t" Santa Bai 
bara to stay a month. 

Coryell. — Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Coryell left Monday, July 4th, for the East 
and Europe for a three months' trip. 

Collier. — Captain Wm. B. Collier, Miss Sara and Miss Lutie Collier are at 
the country home at Clear Lake. They are noted for their pleasant 
week -end house parties. 

Cunningham. — Mrs. James L. Cunningham am! her -laughters, the Misses 
Sara, Mary and Elizabeth Cunningham, left on Saturday for their 
home in New York. 

Cropper. — Mrs. Minnie Thornburgh Cropper has gone East after an ex- 
tended visit here, and she will remain in New York for a short time 
before returning to her home In London. 

Casey. — Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Casey, Miss Margaret Casey and Mr. and 
Mrs. Emory Winship, left Saturday for Santa Barbara, where they 
will spend the summer. 

Crocker. — Charles Templeton Crocker, in his private ear, left with a merry 
group of friends for Santa Barbara for an indefinite period of pleas- 
ure. Mrs. William G. Irwin chaperoned the party, which included 
Miss Helen Irwin, Miss Julia Langhorn, Charles Templeton Crocker, 
and Duane Hopkins. 

Clark. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark have gone to Del Monte for two 
months. 



Beautiful 


Willow 


Plumes 


Made from old feathers and 
boas or new material furnished 


Phone West 221 1398 O'Farrell Street 

GUARANTEE— No Fibers can be Shaken from Plumes I Willow. 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



Dickinson.— Secretary of War J. M. Dickinson, Icklnson, left 

-in the Siberia, -Tune 29th. Many friends gntli dock to wish 

them bon vo 
Dean. — Mr. and Mrs. Waiter E, Dean an at the V'endome 

July. 
Deering.— Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering and their Bm i 

Francesca, left on Friday for Santa Barbai 

a month at the Hotel Potter. 
Gerberdlng.— Mrs. Elizabeth Gerberding and Misa B Gerberding 

have taken a cottage at Carniel, where they are spendlri b mi 
Holladay. — Mr. and Mrs. Sam Holladay are going Bast tin's year with Mr. 

and Mrs. Burke Holladay, after their custom of several summers. 

They will take the children of the family with th< 
Jackson. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jackson have closed their Green 

residence, and are occupying a cottage near Redwood. 
Keeney.— Mrs. James Keeney, with her younger daughter, Miss Helen 

Keeney, will leave for the East later in Lhe month. 
Keeney. — Miss Mary Keeney left on Friday to be the guest of Miss 

Florence Hopkins at Menlo, over the holidays. Miss Keeney and Miss 

Hopkins will leave probably July 9th for Santa Barbara. 
Le Breton. — Albert J. le Breton will leave the middle of July to join Mrs. 

le Breton and Miss Marguerite in Boston. 
Livermore. — Mr. and Mrs. Norman Livermore are the guests of Mr. and 

Mrs. Horatio Livermore at their ranch, "Montesol," in Sonoma County 

for the month of July. 
Martin.— Mrs. Eleanor Martin left on Tuesday tor Portland, accompanied 

by her sons, Peter and Walter Martin. They will be gone for an in- 
definite time on business as well as pleasure. 
Merillion. — Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Merillion, popular members of the Sequoia 

Club, are at Del Monte for a couple of weeks. 
Oiney. — Mrs. Pierre Olney and Miss Anna Olney are at Lake Tahoe. 
Oxnard. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard have gone to Santa Barbara, where 

they have taken a cottage for the season. 
Pierson. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pierson have a cottage at Blithedale for the 

summer. 
Phister. — Colonel and Mrs. Nat. Phister and their daughter, Miss Phister, 

have deserted the Presidio for the Yosemite Valley. 
Rosborough. — Mrs. A. M. Rosborough and her son, Joe, shortly leave for 

Europe. They are now at Tahoe. 
Smith. — Mrs. Reginald Knight Smith has gone to San Ysidro, near Santa 

Barbara, for the summer. 
Schussier. — Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schussler will leave August 1st for New 

York, en route to Europe, where they will meet Miss Alice Schussler 

and Mr. and Mrs. Martin Treuss (Miss Louise Schussler.) 
Slack. — Judge and Mrs. Slack left for Banff in Canada, where they will 

make a brief visit, going from there to Montreal. 
Tobin. — Miss Agnes Tobin has returned to Del Monte, where she will 

spend the greater part of the summer. 
Thompson. — Mrs. Frederick W. Thompson and her daughter. Miss Janet 

Thompson, will pass most of the summer at their country place, 

"Pine Lodge," in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 
Towne. — Mrs. A. N. Towne, her daughter, Mrs. Clinton Worden, and son- 

in-law, to Lake Tahoe for two months. 
Welch. — Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch will join the society contingent at 

Santa Barbara for the month of July. 
Wheeler. — William R. Wheeler left Wednesday on the Mariposa for Ta- 
hiti. 
Wilson. — Miss Mary A. Wilson, of Berkeley, is chaperoning a parts "' 

young friends on a two weeks' trip through the Yosemite. Some of 

i hose of the party are Miss Carmen Ghlradelll, of Berkeley, Miss 

Belle Heckman. and Miss Ruth Heynem;inu. oi Belvedere, 
Wilson. — Mountford Wilson went to Santa Barbara on Saturday to spend 

the holiday with his family, who are settled there for the summer. 



INTIMATIONS. 

Angt In. —Margaret Axiglin and the other members ot hei troupe arrived 

Sunday at Del Monte, and w < - there for the festivities of the Fourth. 
Beylard. — Miss Sopln-' Beylard is ba< h hoi le In Burling; 

ation for appendicitis. 
Barneson. — Miss Muriel Barneson, daughtei of i 

has returned to her homo in Ban Mateo having i an 

operation for append! 
Blue. — Mrs. Victor Blui has taken apartments at thi Hotel Victoria dur- 
ing the suiniii i 
Burke. — Mr. and Mrs. William Burke (Genevieve Walker) ban 

stopping .-it the Palace since their return from their wedding journey, 

and are among the In 1 I 

is of music, from I until 6 o'clock Recently they wen 

al dinner of Mrs, Eleanoi Martin, the 

terta Ined a large pai ty In i heir honor. 
Cooper.— Mr. and Mrs. O ' and Miss Ethel Cooper, are at Del 

t with Mrs. C00pe 
Carolan.— Mrs. James Carolan and Miss Bmllj l re at the Sea 

Beach ] 
□arrack.— Marshall Darrack writes from Manila that he had a delight f:il 

Urns in Shanghai, and is being entertained royally In Manila. 
Eweii. — Mrs. Jan.- Swell, who has been visiting friends In Manila, will 
n tly foi a tour of C - 



| I vorld 1 re returning t» California. 

Gray.— Mr. and Mrs. Harry N. day and their daughter, -Miss Helen Gray, 

are enjoyin 

Greenway.— Edward M. ■ turn fi i »*tober, 

.utd his assemblies w ill tali 

. the Brat one has been scheduled foi ovembei Ith. 
Graham.— Mr, and Mrs. William Miller Graham are al presenl lr 

ami will make the trip i bei amm< i gau this i i h. 

Holton. — Mr. and Mrs i.. .f. Holton and Miss Wllmol Holton have en- 
ad three weeks m the fosemlte, and are again al the Palrmont* 
b to Santa Barbara, where the; have a beautiful home, where- 
in thej will spend the remainder of the summer. Misa Holton was 
one "i the belles of last aeason, having enjoyed all of the gaieties so 
deai to the heaii of a debutante. She la hersell a charming hostess, 
and entertained her girl friends delightfully at the Fairmont. 

Hathaway. — Mrs. Charles W. Hathaway is entertaining at her home. 
SVcamore Park, Messrs. Sherwood and Alan Lowrey, recently from 
i hi rva rd, 

Hewitt.— Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell E-Iewitt are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Sadoc Tobin at Sobre Villa. 

Kawananakoa. — Princess Kawananakoa will return to her home in Pre- 
sidio Terrace from Honolulu at the end of July. 

Laine. — Mrs. J. B. Laine and Miss Otilla Lalne are guests of Judge and 
Mrs. Van Fleet at their country home at Inverness. 

Lanel. — Mine. Etienne Lanel (Amy McKee) has joined Mrs. Henshaw and 
Miss Florence Henshaw in Europe. 

Lyman. — Mrs. Charles Lyman and Edmond Lyman are spending the sum- 
mer in Europe. They will return to San Francisco before the rainy 
season. Captain Lyman lias returned to the Hotel St. Francis after 
a visit to Castle Crags. 

McMillan. — Mrs. Robert McMillan is visiting her parents at their Sonoma 
Ranch. Captain McMillan, U. S. A., will join her here in August. 

Mattheis. — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mattheis, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward de Witt Taylor, visited Lake County last week, returning 
on Tuesday. Blue Lakes was the objective point. 

Page. — Mrs. Arthur Page will return shortly with her son, who is a stu- 
dent at Taft School in the East. Mr. and Mrs. Page have taken a 
house at San Rafael for the summer. 

Pfingst. — Miss Florence Porter Pfingst writes that her visit in the Orient 
is full of delightful surprises. 

Piilsbury. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pillsbury are at the Pacific avenue resi- 
dence for a few days after a visit to Del Monte. Mrs. Pillsbury will 
return to Monterey next week for a month's sojourn. 

Roosevelt. — Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., are making many 
friends among" San Franciscans now in Santa Barbara. They are the 
motif for much entertaining. 

Sharon. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon will he in San Francisco August 1st, 
having left Paris. 

Sherman. — Dr. W. W. Sherman, of Fresno, is staying at the Hotel Vic- 
toria during a six weeks' visit in town. 

Stow. — Mr. and Mrs. Vanderlyn Stow will remain in New York for sev- 
eral weeks before sailing for Europe. 

Tevis. — Two charming cousins of Dr. Harry Tevis are guests at the Fair- 
mont, and are enjoying the hospitality of the genial Tevis and sev- 
eral friends. They are Mrs. J. P. Arnsden. of Versailles, Ky., and Mrs. 
W. M. I-Iaupt of New York. Mr. Haupt accompanies his wife. The 
visitors have not been in San Francisco for some time, and are de- 
lighted with their visit. Dr. Tevis entertained with a delightful 
luncheon party In honor of ids cousins, the first of the week, follow- 
ing it up with a second luncheon a few days later. 

Tuckey. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tuekey and their daughter, Miss Marguerite 
will tour the Orient this summer. Miss Marguerite is to become the 
bride of Or. Leon Garcia, U. S. A., on their arrival at Manila. 

Webster. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Webster have given up their apart- 
ments at the Grenada, and arc established in their home In Clay 
street. 

Wilshire. — Miss Doris Wllshlre was £uest of Miss Marian Mirvin at Mil] 
Valley over the Fourth. She will shortly leave for Tahoe with Mends 




el/ntwi 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

Our Cooking Will Meet Your Taste 



54-64 Ellis Street 

Our Prices Will Please You 



PALO ALTO 
CAL. 



Manzanita Hall 

A home school for boys desiring a thorough preparation for college. Lack 
of rigid classification makes for rapid advancement. Location adjacent to 
Stanford University permits unusual advantages. Ample facilities for all athletic 
sports. Eighteenth year opens August 30th. Send for illustrated catalogue- 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master 



Go to Headquarters 

BATHING SUITS 

Sweater Coats Summer Underwear 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 




Cor. Grant Ave. and Post Sts. 



Qilbw®im<gifo m4 S^attandl MesMh 



By Harriett Watson Capwell. 



There is a committee in the United States on National Health. 
Professor Irving Fisher, of Yale University, is the executive of 
this committee of one hundred, and in his recent report he says 
that full measure of credit must be given to the women's clubs 
for the impetus toward well being. In many places where the 
city budget does not provide for school nurses, they arc paid 
by women's clubs, and a list is given of the cities where medical 
inspection and nurses are provided by these clubs. 

The critics of women's clubs should ponder over this state- 
ment before flaying women's organizations as impedimenta in 
the development of the world. Public health is a chief concern, 
and clubwomen are sharing the burden of bringing about right 
living — which leads to high thinking. Whatever their sins of 
omission and com mission, this effort toward national health 
places women's clubs in the rank of beneficent factors in human 
progress. In the elder days, it was considered exquisitely femi- 
nine to be ailing. Robust health was plebeian, and patrician in- 
deed was the blessed woman who could faint to order. Doubt- 
less when women's clubs first made their appearance, this taint 
of delicacy showed even in their organizations. It was so gen- 
eral that even a body of pioneer clubwomen must have suffered 
from the blight of a common interest in ailments. 

It used to be the fashion to droop visibly when any one asked 
"how are you?" A clubwoman said to me just the other day: 
"Why, even when the California Club was first formed, we had 
members who loved to talk about their ills and ailments. From 
its inception our club was dedicated to large affairs — we are not 
a pioneer club, but we pioneered the idea here of a large demo- 
cratic organization dedicated to useful work as well as intel- 
lectual development. One would not expect to find w en with 

a contempt for health in such a club, and yet I remember one 
used to hear vivid descriptions of diseases and operation.-. Aboul 
the time that the appendix first became fashionable as e cess 
baggage, a prominent clubwoman went up to a hospital for a 
Ttinor throat operation. She returned to clubdom radiant, and 
was at once the center of a little group to whom the scent of the 
anaesthetic was like the smell of battle to the old war horse. 
'Yes, my throat is cured,' she said indifferently, 'but' — this with 
fine enthusiasm — T also had my appendix removed.' 'Did you 
have appendicitis?' enviously inquired an aspirant for operation 
honors. 'No," answered the radiant one, T didn't have appendi- 
citis, but 1 thought as long as I was in the sanitorium anyway, 
I'd have my appendix removed, and have it over with. The 
ounce of prevention, you know.' " 

This conversation, quoted verbatim, shows how far clubwomi D 
have traveled in the last half dozen years. It is now shocking 
bad form to talk about one's health at any of the places ivhi re 
women foregather. It is a questionable topic at a social func- 
tion, and unmentionable at a club affair. Women arc no longer 
concerned with their own little insides. It is now good form to 
be healthy, and almost every one joins the Ananias Club if any- 
thing is the matter. For example, if you have ptomaine poi-.m- 
ing and a toothache, and some one asks about vour health, 
are supposed to sweetly answer, "Oh, I'm line." ' The modern a - 
sumption is, that every one is in perfect health until proven to 
the contrary. Whereas it used to be the other way around. 
© © © 

A number of forces have contributed to this change. Whether 
or not the doctrine of Christian Science appeals, it must 
knowledged that it has been a determining factor in making good 
health fashionable. Our special consideration is with club- 
women, and so I asked a competent judge how far the pleas ini 
responsibility rested with Scientists. "Eonghly estimating the 
number of clubwomen who are in Science," she answered, "I 
should say that not more than one-quarter of the number belong 
to that church. But nevertheless their influence has been evi- 
dent in the aggregate, and has helped largely to make it un- 
fashionable to be sick. There is, however, another factor that 
enters. Women are no longer concerning themselves with their 
individual and imaginary ailments. They have a broad \ iew- 
point— they are trying to understand and check the national 
plagues. 

"Boston is the stronghold of Christian Science, and yet ihai 
city above all shows the broader interest of women in fightino- 
diseases. Through the persistent efforts of the clubwomen and 
the co-operation of the Board of Health and Board of Bducal ion, 
Boston has a system of school inspection second to none in the 



world. A year ago a committee investigated the problem of 
tuberculosis among school children, and reported that at a con- 
servative estimate 5,000 were afflicted. Now there is a course "I 
lectures given in every school in Boston on the study and pre- 
vention of tuberculosis. The focus of infection is in the family 
life, and the children are instructed in school, while the visiting 
nurse tries to show the parents how to live in a sanitary and 
cleanly manner. When women become interested in the grave 
problem of humanity — how to keep the child well — they forget 
about their own head-iches and finger-aches. Clubwomen have 
never, as a whole, taken President Koosevelt and his race suicide 
exhortations very seriously. He insists too much on the dangers 
of a deliberately reduced birth rate, and lays no stress on the 
rate race suicide which consists in neglect of the health 
of children." 

© © © 
This neglect of the health of children as a form of race suicide 
was appreciated in Switzerland, France and Germany before 
America had its awakening. Professor Fisher is not "the only 
one who gives the women's clubs some credit for the awakening. 
Pheta Childe Dorr, in a recent article, writes: "Hardly a large 
city school system is now without its stall of nurses. Where 
their salaries are not provided, they are paid by women's clubs, 
by charity organizations, societies or by wealthy and benevolent 
individuals. About 360 American cities now have some form 
of medical inspection of schools. So of ibis inspection i- con- 
cerned solely with the exclusion Prom school of contagious dis- 
eases. Two hundred and thirty-four cities examine children for 



San Francisco, Cal., July 1st, 1910 

ON JULY 15th ALTMAN'S WILL BE TAKEN OVER BY 
A NEW FIRM-AND ON 

July 5th 

We will start a 

Final 10 Days' Sale 

When every garment remaining 

MUST BE SOLD 

The reduettions are extreme and 
you may come expecting unheard 
of bargains. Respectfully 




//*<• v P f>o o A TtB 



139-141 GEARY ST., Bet. Grant Ave. and Stockton St. 



Miss Harker's School, 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. BeA 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Niaht 



Illustrating: 
Sketching 
Pain tine 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



• i. .a. «inl\ one hundred and nineteen cities pay at- 
>i id defective teeth, which, accordin ,1 phy- 
sicians, arc of more importance than i i - diseases. 

nutrition follows defectiyi teeth almosl as n natter of co 
All kinds uf intestinal and digestive disorders resull from swal- 
lowing the bacteria oJ : i tissue. Wo child whose teeth are 

in a bad condition can I" expected to do the work of a i al 

child. Toothache is one of the mosi prolific causes of non-at- 
tendance a( school, and consequent lagging in grades. 'This ie 
.i costly matter to the schools. Each child who Tails of promotion 
at the end of the srh. ml year, who must repeat his year's work, 
costs the taxpayer the price of his education twice over. A 
small dentist bill paid at the outset is vastly cheaper." 
© © © 

In San Francisco, clubwomen have 1 been indirectly responsible 
for medical inspection of schools. They talked and talked, and 
then talked some more about what other cities were doing in 
thai line, and finally the echo of the talk-l'cst roused the powers 
that be, and there are now medical inspectors, though the work 
is by no means as exhaustive as in some of the Eastern cities. 
Perhaps you fancy that there is less necessity here, for conditions 
are unquestionably kinder than over the Great Divide where the 
extremes of heat and cold and over-population increase mor- 
tality. Yet here is a surprising fact, which you can readily 
verify. San Francisco has the highest mortality in tuberculosis 
of any of the ten largest cities in the United States. The rate 
here is about one in five and one-half, or in other words, l(i to 
30 per cent of the deaths here are due to the ravages of the 
Great White Plague. 

Modern pathology eurlorses the theory that the seed of this 
dread disease is usually planted in childhood, even though it is 
not manifested until later. So the health and care of the child 
is the chief concern of those who arc endeavoring to grapple with 
tuberculosis. Various settlements here co-operate with the pub- 
lic school inspectors. Telegraph Hill settlement has neighbor- 
hood nurses who are leaching sanitation and prevention in hones 
which otherwise would never see the light — and many diseases 
cannot be suppressed nnless the home, which is the focus of in- 
fection, is regulated by the standard of modern cleanliness. Miss 
Briggs and her settlement nurses arc likewise letting in beams of 
light in the Potrero district. 

A new association, co-operating with all these, is the San 
Francisco Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis. It was to assist this soeielv financially that Maud 
Allen gave her services recently. The building, which is oppo- 
site the Associated Charities, is designed for educational work as 
well as I'm' the treatment of patients. In flu- laTge assembly hail 
lectures are given to variotiB groups of people on this vital sub- 
ject. The letter carriers recently listened to an illuminating talk, 
ami in turn each organization and union will be given the same 
privilege. Three nurses care For the patients, who usually num- 
ber about thirty, and are sent there by the settlements and clin- 
ics. Mrs. John S. Merrill. Sr., is :i pi incnl clubwoman who 

is giving much of her time to Ibis work. 



Well-dressed man concede thai ready-made shirts are 

unsatisfactory from the standpoint not only of comfort, but of 

sl\le. Shirts should be made to order by skilled workmen, and 

al. I>. C. Heger's establishment, '.'!.". Kearny street, such arc 

found. Heger's shirts and underwear are of i bi' latest 

and always lit admirably. I'' ■« things ire SO untidy as ill-fitting 
sbirls. and for tins reason, Ueger's is particularly popular with 

■ oi fashion, »ie> want the beel linen and underwear as well as 

the best outer garments. 



"I want to learn to make jelly," said the newly installed 

house-wife. "Is it hard?" "Oh, Lord. no. mum!" replied the 
cook, wiib supreme pity. "It's soft." — '■■ 



There is no go in either a motor ear or a maid that can't be 
made to spark. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Pictures of all kinds made and framed to order by Fowzer. the ar 

list photographer. 3U'fi Sixteenth street, near Valencia. Finest child 
reus and professional work in the city. Photographs any time, n 

size. 



TAKE A 

VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

TO THE COUNTRY WITH YOU 
VICTORS from $10 to $100 on the Easiest Terms 

From our 100,000 Records you and your friends can be 
entertained at a moment's notice by foremost bands, the 
greatest opera artists, funny comedians, sweet singers, and 
all kinds of clever people— take along all the latest song hits 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

Steinway ind Olher Pianos. 

Player Pianos of All Grades Viclor Talkinf Machines 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS, OAKLAND 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



Incomparably better than any other in its class 
A Little Lower Priced Than the Others 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

113-117 Kearny Street near Post 



For Dandruff and all Scalp Diseases 
Hi A. F. COSGROVE 

SPECIALIST 

Diseases of the Hair and Scalp, at 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

239 POWELL STREET 




H. BETTE 



Ladies Tailor 



and 



Habit Maker 



IMPORTER OF FINE NOVELTIES 



Fall Importations and styles just received. 



270 SUTTER STREET 



Opposite White House 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 




THE MEMORY. 

Down the little crooked streci thai went to meet the sea 

The torn nets were drying on the grass. 
She was mending at the old mis; she never looked at me — 
On a blue September morning, with a west wind blowing free; 
She never raised her head to watch me pass. 

'Tis all I took away with me — a blue September morning, 
The little street, the green grass, and one girl's scorning. 

I've forgot my fathers house, the house that saw me born. 

Forgot my mother's blessing at the las! : 
There's nothing but the old nets, tangled-like and torn ; 
And the head that bent above them, yellow-colored as the corn. 
That never raised to watch me as I passed. 

I wish I'd be forgetting it— a blue September morning, 
The blowing grass, the torn nets and one girl's scorning. 
— Theodosia Garrison in. Smart Set. 
* * * 
Professor William Cleaver Wilkinson is a genial, entertaining 
writer, and his occupation of the chair of Poetry and Criticism 
at the University of Chicago giveB him authority to publish such 
a volume as he has brought forth under tin' title. "The Good of 
Life and Other Little Essays." The essays are extremely enter- 
taining, however one may differ with the author in the point of 
view. A very wide field has been covered in the subjects chosen. 
which include "Hating as a Duty," "The Favoritism of His- 
tory," "The Feud with "Food," "The Folly of Being Sorry," and 
more than two score others, but when the author criticises 
Goethe's "Faust" in one essay and discusses canal horses in the 
next, his literary scope may be regarded as more fantastic than 
catholic. 

Funk & Wagnalls Co., New York. 



Before his death, at the advanced age of 96, Galen Clark, the 
noted pioneer of the Yosemite Valley, completed a work that 
had occupied him for many years, namely, a history of the 
beautiful valley itself, with a description of its fauna and flora, 
(he origin of the Indian names associated with it, old legends 
and other features of the park. It is now published in 
booklet form, under the title "The Yosemite Valley," beautifully 
illustrated in half-tone, and with an introduction by Major Ben 
C. Truman, who says that the book is "the gem of books on the 
Yosemite Valley, and scintillates like a star." 

Published by Nelson L. Salter, Yosemite, Cal. 



A quiet, bashful sort of a young fellow was making a call 

on a Capitol Hill girl one evening not so very long ago, when her 
father came into the parlor with his watch in his hand. It' 
was about 9 :30 o'clock. At the moment the young man was 
standing on a chair straightening a picture over the piano. The 
girl had asked him to !ix it. As he turned, the old gentleman, a 
gruff, stout fellow, said : "Young man. do you know what time ii 
is?" The bashful youth got off the chair nervously. "Yes, sir," 
he replied. "I was just going." He went into the hall without 
any delay, and took his hat and coat. The girl's father followed 
him. As the caller reached for the door-knob, the old gentleman 
again asked him if he knew what time it was. "Yes, sir." was 
the youth's reply. "Good night!" And he left without waiting 
to put his coat on. After the door closed, the old gentleman 
turned to the girl. "What's the matter with that fellow?" he 
asked. "My watch ran down this afternoon, and I wanted him 
to tell me the time, so that I could set it." — Denver Post. 



A shrinkage of nearly *19,000,000 in the cash holdings 

of New York banks, reported in last Saturday's bank statement, 
much disquietude in that city and throughout the Easi 
this week, as 'he shrinkage was difficult to account for. 



Big Panoche 

Oil Stock now selling 
at 

15c. Per Share 



Now is the time to buy before 
the next raise. Big Panoche 
Oil Company, 410 Mills Bldg., 
San Francisco. Phone Kearny 
4585 Home C 1695 



$25 to $50 

(According to Model) 

BUYS A REBUILT( Kw TYPEWRITER 

Your Choice 

Remington, Smith Premier, Oliver.Underwood 
All other makes of Typewriters at special prices 

A New Machine Guarantee 

eroes with every sale. 

"Write for descriptive leaflet. 

Rebuilt Department 
L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

512 Market Street Sao Francisco. Calif. 

Branches— Los Angeles. Portland, Seattle, Spokane. 




BELKNAP 

Addressing Machine 

FOR SALE CHEAP 

One power drive Belknap Addressing Machine 
complete with typewriter to stencil names. Will 
address and cut 6000 wrappers per hour. 

Room 16, 773 Market Street 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



83 




OVERLAND MONTHLY 

FOR JULY 



The Awakening of Mexico 
Centenary of the Republic 



CONTENTS 



FRONTISPIECES MEXICAN INDUSTRIES 1-2 

THE AWAKENING OF A NATION . . PIERRE N. BERINGER 3 

Marvelous Mexico and the Muckraker. A study on the spot. 

Illustrated with photographs. 
THE MUCK RAKER 10 

Illustrated with photographs. 

THE FINANCES OF MEXICO 16 

MAKING A FRESH START 19 

The Long Peace. 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
THE TRAMWAY AND POWER SYSTEM IN MEXICO 

CITY AND THE FEDERAL DISTRICT . CLARENCE E. FERGUSON 23 

Illustrated with Portrait. 
HOW TO SEE MEXICO BY THE EPICURE 29 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
PUEBLA, MEXICO 40 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
MEXICO ON THE SEA 41 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
THE GROWTH OF BUSINESS IN MEXICO 44 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
THE ISTHMUS AND ITS STATES . . . OLIVER HARRIS 62 

THE MINING STATES OF MEXICO 64 

A YELLOW DOG. Story WILL SCARLET 66 

THE FOURTH IN OUR COLONIES . . . MONROE WOOLLEY 71 

THE BALLADE OF A HUNDRED LOVES. Verse ELIOT KAYS STONE 74 

THE MANDARIN'S BIRTHDAY GIFT. Story . JOHN ARTHUR MURRAY 76 

SOME NEW FOODS, FRUITS AND PLANTS ARTHUR INKERSLEY 78 

THE FUNERAL LEVITY OF SUSANNE. Story JOANNA GLEED STRANGE 80 

A TRAMP'S AWAKENING. Story . . . WILLLVM H. HAMMER 86 

SUNSET ON SAN DIEGO BAY. Verse . JESSIE PORTER WHITAKER 90 

MAJOR-GENERAL JAMES FRANKLIN BELL FRED A. HUNT 91 

Illustrated with Portrait. 

SANTA CATALINA. Verse NEIL C. WILSON 96 

GOD'S CHOSEN PEOPLE C. T. RUSSELL 98 

VI. — Israel's New Covenant. 
SUNSET ON MONTEREY BAY. Verse MARTHA JANE GARVIN 101 

STORY OF ORIZABA, MEXICO 102 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
IN THE LIME LIGHT IN MEXICO .... BY THE PUBLISHER 107 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
ORGANIZATION OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

IN THE FEDERAL DISTRICT, MEXICO 114 

Illustrated with Photographs. 

RUBBER IN MEXICO CLARENCE E. FERGUSON Hi 

EL PASO— THE GATEWAY TO MEXICO 120 

Illustrated with Photographs. 

GENERAL FELIX DIAZ P. N. BERINGER 136 

AMERICA'S OBERAMMERGAU .... GUSTAVE FROHMAN 138 



$1.50 a Year 



15 Cents per Copy 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 




The Oil Market. 



The market for California oil is 
steadily widening. After many 
years of remarkable conservatism, 
the United States Government is at last making' use of i1 as 
fuel for warships, having begun with a number of destroyers, 
after the successful experiments on the monitor Cheyenne. Later, 
it is proposed that larger men-of-war be furnished with oil burn- 
ing apparatus. Now comes the British Government, which, 
through agents, is reported to haw purchased large oil properties 
in this State, with a view of laying it in wholesale, transporting 
the oil from iis fields to tank steamers on the coasl and thence to 
oil depots in the Pacific Ocean corresponding to coaling stations. 
The use of oil for commercial purposes on land is rapidly in- 
creasing, not only transportation and manufacturing companies 
having adopted it as a substitute for coal, but hotels, office build- 
Lugs and even private residences, in many cases, having adopted 
Oil as their fuel. As the demand for fuel oil increases, the call 
upon California to supply it becomes ever greater. Result: The 
nil properties of California are increasing steadily in value, their 
output being seized up as fast as pul out. There is do better in- 
vestment to-day in this Stab — in fact anywhere — than ill good 
oil properties. 



Oil Lnddstry 
Growing Rapidly. 



It is evident that fuel oil promises to 
bring mere wealth into California 
than the harvest of gold tha 
brought fame to this wonderful 
State. Although the oil industry in this State is still in its in- 
fancy, it is advancing with great leaps. California being now the 
greatest oil producer in the country, even exceeding Pennsyl- 
vania, Oklahoma and Texas in output of oil of high grade. Not 
only directly but indirectly does fuel oil bring wealth to the 
State, for its presence makes profitable the establishment of 
manufacturing plants which could not exist without this con- 
venient and fine fuel. More and more foreign capital is finding 
investment in California oil lands, and far-seeing financiers are 
exhibiting practical interest in them. No industry in the State 
is so extensive as the oil industry, even now, and its future gi es 
wide scope to the imagination, when the rapidly growing Pacific 
Ocean markets continue the increase in their demands. 



Excellent reports continue from the Big Panoche Oil 

properties in the Vallecitos distriet of San Benito County. This 
remarkably high grade nil is now being produced in quantities 
sufficient to demonstrate that the Big Panoche is destined to be 
one of the State's greatest products. It ranges from 29 to 40 
gravity, and is near the surface, making development easy. Nine 
rigs are in operation, or about to be in operation, and everything 
is proceeding most satisfactorily. 



Oil at Pajaro. 



William Irelan. Jr., formerly State 
Mineralogist, recently made a report 
on the Pajaro Oil Co.'s properties 

about five miles east of Watsonville. which was so enc aging 

that the eompanv i- going ahead with their work. They h 

well started, ami are now down 300 feet, having passed th gh 

two layers of oil sand. The location of the property is such that 
the well will eventually be a big producer of oil. The quality 
found so far is of a high grade. The following is Mr. Irelan'a 
report : 

William Irelan, Jr., Mining Engineer, Ex-Stntr Mineralogist, 
Ex-State Engineer. 

Berkeley. Cal., March 26, 1910. 
J. M. Smith, Esq. 

Dear Sir — I have returned from an examination of the 
Pajaro Vallev Oil Company's properties, which are situate in 
Sections 11, 12, 13, 14, 22 and 23, Township 11 South, Range 
2 E., M. 1). B. & M., in Santa Cruz, five miles northeasterly from 
Watsonville, California. 

Four test wells were drilled on the property some years since 



to determine the pitch and trend of the oil sands. The wells 
reached a depth of 30 feet, 95 feet, 105 feet, and TOO feet re- 
spectively. The TOO foot well encountered a heavy flow of gas 
at a depth of 010 feet: the well was continued 00 feet deeper, but 
at this point the great pressure of the gas and heaving sand 
necessitated the temporary capping and abandonment of the well 
in December, 1901, the drilling to he resumed when proper ap- 
pliances could hi- procured for further development. * * * * 

Tlte geological formations of the property arc conducive to 
petroleum deposits, and in the ravines where the upper strata 
have been removed by erosion at different points along the strike 
of the underlying oil sands, I found oulcroppings impregiialed 
with oil. Upon distillation of these -amis, Ihey yielded oil of 
very high gravity. 

In concluding, I woulTl advise development of the property. 
as the deduction from my examination warrants the belief that 
wells put down to sufficient depth would be large producers, as 
the geological condirions tend to prove that oil in large quantil ies 
i- contained in the underlying sands. 



l'i;<> 1 1 1 ti\<; Home 

[Mil S'l |;i . 



The great diversity of California re- 
sources has hitherto been unappre- 
ciated by the country and the world 
at large, but it is now being brought 

: genera] view. For example, it was the practice for years 

for the national Government, in making contracts for its public 
buildings, to specify certain kinds of -lone or timber or other 
material, which could be obtained only in certain Stale-. In 
the Los Angeles postoffice building, Wyoming sandstone was 
specified: at the Santa Rosa postoffice building, Indiana lime- 
stone, Vermont marble and other foreign material^ were re- 
quired. Now. thanks to the efforts of State Mineralogist L. B. 
Anbury, the Federal Government has awakened to the fact that 
not only these, but many other materials, can be obtained in 
quantities, and of equally good, if not better, qualities, in Cali- 
fornia, act lower prices than before. 

California has untold n sources. First, it was the gold, which 
caused the great mass of people to overlook everything else. Then 



Privite Wire-New York. Cbicflgo 



Western Union Code 



J. C. WILSON 



New York Stock Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Slock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 



Main Office 

MILLS BUILDING 

San Francisco 

Correspondents 

HARRIS. WINTHROP & CO. 

New York. Chicago, London and Paris 



Branch Offices 

PALACE HOTEL 

(Main Corridor) San Francisco 

HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



MORE THAN 



5% 



The increased cost of living has made it necessary for 
the investor to seek a larger return on his money 
To meet this demand we have a carefully prepared 
list of bonds yielding a high rate and affording perfect 
SAFETY OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST 
■Write for our Circular 
SUTRO & CO., 412 Montgomery St, San Francisco 



THE OIL BOOK An Authority on California Oil 

A Weekly Publication Devoted to the Oil Industry 
Mailed free upon request. 

LINCOLN MORTGAGE AND LOAN COMPANY 

14th and 15th Floors 166 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

New York Seattle Los Angeles 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



.h i.y 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



the vast agricultural and viticulture] cap , State 

became appreciated. Now il i- the won ,. \,.\i 

will come .-i variet; ler mineral products, such as [raniti 

sandstone, gypsum, terra cotta, pumice stone, marble, slate, 
onyx, and so on. California is yet in her infamy ■ i weall 
iroducer, in spite of the wonders she has done in the past and 
present. 



"For the Hawaiian Islands, from 'Norfolk, Va." 

British S. S. Kilchattan To U. S. Governmenl 

British 8. S. Den of Crombie To U. S. Government. 

British S. S. Damara To U. S. Government. 

British S. S. Romera To U. S. Government. 

British S. S. Masunda To U. S. Government. 

American ship Erskine M. Phelps To TJ. S. Government. 

The above should be carefully photographed upon the mind of 
the reader. It is an extract from the shipping page of a marine 
journal. It denotes the vessels bound for Hawaii "from Norfolk, 
Va., U. S. A. They are all laden with coal for the United States 
Navy, at its station at Honolulu. Five are foreign vessels. One 
is an American sailing ship, driven out of the foreign trade 
by our unfavorable laws. The United States Government has 
to employ foreign vessels to transport its coal even in ordinary 
times, when there is no prospect of war, no great trip of a huge 
fleet. In so doing, between American ports, it is violating its own 
navigation laws, which expressly exclude foreign vessels from our 
coastwise trade. In other words, we have not enough American 
vessels to do our navy's coaling. Can there be any more eloquent 
exposition of the imperative need for Congress to come to the 
aid of our shipbuilders and shipowners, by giving them legisla- 
tion that will restore our flag to the seas and make our navy in- 
dependent of foreign merchant marines? 



Official reports place the world's wheat production for 

1909 at 3,624,118,000 bushels, which is 447,939,000 bushels in 
excess of the crop for 1908, and 287,630,000 in excess of the av- 
erage for the five years ending with 1909. Prom present indica- 
tions, it is believed that the yield for 1910 will exceed that of 
1909. 



■ The Western Pacific Railroad has postponed the opening 

of its line for passenger service from August 7th to a date in the 
latter part of the same month, to be announced soon. 



Henry Clewes & Co., bankers of New York, state as fol- 
lows : "Notwithstanding the development of justices' latest utter- 
ances regarding combinations, no great amount of liquidation 
has taken place in the stock market, although the Attorney-Gen- 
eral's statement is not calculated to restore confidence by any 
means." 



■ If the plans of Pacific Coast packers succeed, it is highly 

probable that the famed salt codfish industry, for generations 
strongly intrenched in Massachusetts, will have a serious com- 
petitor on this coast. Salmon is not the only great staple fish 
of the Pacific Coast and Alaska. There is big money in both 
codfish and mackerel. 



The local stock market being closed until Jnly 9th, for 

the annua] summer vacation, there is a quiel in the local securi- 
ties. The Eastern exchangee have experienced a period of de- 
pression this week, the reports ol a crop scare in the North 
Middle- West having had a bearish effect. 



The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the 

Security Savings Bank will be held next Monday, July 11th. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Humboldt Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending .Tune 30, 1910, a dividend has been declared at 

tiie rate of four it> per cent per annum on all savings deposits, free of 

1. 1910. Dividends not called 
for are added to and hear the same rate of interest as the principal from 
July 1. 1910. H. C. KLBVESAHL. Cashier. 

Otli. ket street. San 1 

DIVIDENO NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 
A dividend has; been declared for the six months ending June 30. 19U*. 
of t» per cent J>er annum on time deposit money and 4 per cent per annum 
ill money. 

EDWARD SWEENY, President; WM. CORBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Junction Golden Gate Ave.. Market and Taylor Streets. 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF 

The Anglo and London Paris National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS JUNE 30, 1910 

RES0UKCB8. 

Loans and Discounts $16 858 349.35 

I . S. Bonds at Par ■;. 150,000.00 

Other Bonds ami Securities 1,790,860.59 

I Hher Assets 333 505. 1 '.' 

Customers' Liability Under Letters of 

Credit 2,008,019.95 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,304,551.31 



$33,745,386.22 
LIABILITIES. 

Capital Stock $4,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,700,633.61 

Circulation 2,450,000.00 

Letters of Credit, Domestic and Foreign. . . . 2,008,019.95 
Deposits 23,586,632.66 



$33,745,286.22 
OFFICERS. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM President 

H. FLEISHHACKER Vice-President and Manager 

JOS. FRIEDLANDER Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL Cashier 

A. HOCHSTEIN Assistant Cashier 

CHALLEN R. PARKER . .' Assistant Cashier 

HARRY CHOYNSKI Assistant Cashier 

G. R. BURLICK Assistant Cashier 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French-American Bank of Savings. 

(Savings Department), B'ormerly French Savings Bank.) 

For the half year ending June 30. 1910. a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes. 

payable on and after Friday. July 1. 1910. Dividends not called for are 

added to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from July 

1, 1910. 

A. LEGALLET, President. 
Office— 108 Sutter St., San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending June 30, 1910. dividends upon all deposits at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be payable 
on and after July 1, 1910. FRED W. HAY, Secretary. 

Office — 316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Savings and Loan Society. 

(Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For the half year ending June 30, 1910. a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Friday. July 1, 1910. 

Dividends not drawn become part of deposit accounts and earn divi- 
dends from Julv 1st. Monev deposited on or before July 11th will earn 
interest from July 1st. WM. A. BOSTON. Cashier. 

Office — 101 Montgomery St.. corner Sutter. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this day. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and three-fourths (3%) 
per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending June 30. 
1910, free from all taxes, and payable on and after July 1, 1910. Dividends 
not drawn will be added to depositors' accounts and become a part there- 
of, and will earn dividend from July 1, 1910. Deposits made on or before 
July 11. 1910. will draw interest from Julv 1. l 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office — Corner Market. McAllister and Jones Sts.. San Francisco. 
June 27. 1910. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Italian-American Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1910. a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Friday, July 1. 1910. a dividend not drawn will be 
added to the deposit account, become a part thereof, and earn dividend 
from July 1. Money deposited between June 15th and Monday. July 11th. 
I'Oth davs inclusive, commences to earn interest from July lst- 

A. SBARBORO. President; A. E. SBARBORO. Cashier. 
Office — S. E. Cor. Montgomery and Sacramento streets. 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



.July 9, 1910. 




mowBU 



ti~**Bek*"j*i)sim±L 



Z3 



By L. J. Pikkson. 

New automobile owners of San Francisco and vicinity for Ilia 
week ending July 2, 1910: 

June 27th— 

CHAMBERS, J. D., 730 Broadway. San Francisco White 

MASON. E. B.. 1801) Adeline St.. Oakland Stevens-Duryea 

HORSAM, E. A., 2516 Derby street. Berkeley Rambler 

3757 Sacramento street, San Francisco Autocar 

J., 220 E. Twentieth street, Oakland Franklin 

306 Adams' Building. San Francisco Chalmers 

J. F.. 4096 Eighteenth St.. San Francisco Franklin 

1847 Dwight Way, Berkeley Cadillac 



SHARPE, W. H. 
VALENTINE, J. 
PANSON, E. H 
RICHARDS, DR 
LASELU L. M 



PACIFIC STATES ELEC. CO., 137 New Montgomery St., S. F. . Randolph 
June 28th — 

PAGE, A. F., 1165 Jackson street. Oakland Moliue 

LAWRENCE. DR. C. L... £380 Bruce street, Oakland Flanders 

BALDWIN, E. L„ 1J08 Oxford street, Berkeley Buick 

SCATENA, L., 1S1J Vallejo street. San Francisco Chalmers 

BLANCHARD, C. E„ 1437 Forty-eighth ave.. San PYancisco Kline 

PLEITNER, II. A., 1100 Fruitvale ave.. Oakland..: Franklin 

June 29th— 

CRISP, F. J., 624 Mills Building, San Francisco Maxwell 

NICHAUS, E. F., 839 Channing Way, Berkeley E-M-F. 

PHELPS, R. F., 1000 Paru St., Alameda MetE 

WRAMPE LMEIR, T. J., 365 Monadnock Building, S. F Detroit 

STRICKLAND, DR. D. II.. Lindo Apartments, S. F Speedwell 

June 30th — 

RODGERS, J. P., 823 Thirty-sixth St., Oakland Overland 

SMITH, GUT C, 424 Hill Lane street. Oakland Interstate 

June 30th — 

MILLER, T. L., 2526 Union St.. San Francisco Auburn 

MEARNS, J. C. 147S Sixth avenue, San Francisco Marlon 

Rl'BEL, GEO., 2227 Shattuck avenue, Berkeley Ford 

FOSTERER, B. A„ Weldon and Walker ave., Oakland Ford 

SINGWELL, GEO., 4046 Twenty-sixth street, S. F Olds 

July 1— 

SULLIVAN, MATT I„ Humboldt Bank Bldg.. S. F Fierce-Arrow 

BOWIE, B. H., Redwood City Tourist 

HARWOOD, A. J., Fairmont Hotel. San Francisco. . -Chalmers-Detroit 

STIDGER, O. P., 54 Carmelita St., San Francisco Rambler 

FRENCH, L. A.. 134 Jackson St.. San Francisco Rambler 

MILLER & LUX, 1314 Merchants' Exchange Bldg., S. F Renault 

CLEARY, E. M., 589 Jean St., Oakland Overland 

KLEIBER, P., 1424 Folsom St., San Francisco Fuller 

CASSARETTO, JNO., 345 Berry St, San Francisco 

WANNAMAKER, R„ 1049 Stanyan St., San Francisco 

RATHJEN. F., 1315 Pacilic avenue, San Francisco 

July 2d— 

S. F. GAS & ELECTRIC CO., 445 Sutter St., S. F Overland 

MARTIN, J. C, JR., 210 Balboa Bldg., San Francisco E-M-F. 

FIGONE, A., 739 Filbert St., San Francisco Maxwell 

McDUFFIE, D., Balboa Bldg.. San Francisco Pope-Hartford 

KELLY, G. F., 2713 Mission St.. San Francisco Autocar 

COWELL PORTLAND CEMENT CO., 9 Main St.. S. F Speedwell 

ADY. J. C, care 836-8 Franklin St., Oakland Reo 

METROPOLITAN LAUNDRY CO., 1148 Harrison St., S. F Cartercar 

* * * 

Motor-driven trucks and delivery wagons, which for tin? past 
two years have been in common use in the leading Eastern tratic 
centers, are beginning to appear in large numbers in the princi- 
pal commercial cities throughout the Coast, and San Francisco 
is calling for its share of these vehicles with almost as loud a 
voice as it has been doing for the pleasure cars. 

The motor car is now recognized as having a greater working 
capacity, capable of attaining more speed and conceded to be 
just as reliable, if not more so, than the horse-drawn vehicle, and 
as a result is supplanting the latter mode of transfer generally. 
It has taken some time to convince the commercial houses that 
motor driven trucks not only have the desirable assets for doing 
more work and doing it in a shorter time, but that it is a cheaper 
means of delivery than the horse. The fact, however, has been 
so clearly demonstrated within the last year or so that the com- 
mercial truck is now coming into its just popularity, and at such 
a rate that it promises in the very near future to be the one 
means of delivery not only among the larger commercial bouses, 
but in the smaller retail stores as well. 

To meet this fast-growing demand, all the leading automobile 



factories in the country are establishing truck and delivery wagon 
departments, and from reports coming from these manufactur- 
ing districts, the business in this line will soon equal that for the 
pleasure cars. Several new plants have been established within 
the last year devoted exclusively to the manufacture of com- 
mercial vehicles. 

When the commercial car was first introduced Sve year- ago, 
leading merchants exercised much care before they were willing 
to try the motor car for means of delivery, believing they would 
wait until the experiment stage was over. The experiment stage 
is now past, and the merchant is realizing that the horse-drawn 
vehicle is far too slow to keep pace with modern American speed 
in business and otherwise. 

The motor truck has become practically a necessity because 
of the speed which can be made with it. Along this line there 
is no comparison between the self-propelled and the horse-drawn 
vehicle. Undoubtedly one of the greatest advantages of the 
motor truck, ami to which it owes its popularity is its ability to 
work for an indefinite length of time, lis power to work has 
no limit. 

* * * 

It has been found that the economy of the motor truck is de- 
rived largely from its ability to work an indefinite time. In 
every line of business it has been found cheaper than the horse 
and wagon. With many of the large department stores in the 
Eastern centers it has become almost a necessity. These con- 
cerns, which must necessarily deliver a larger amount of goods 
in a shorter length of time, have found that the self-propelled 
delivery wagon is a solution of the increased business prosperity 
in the country. Not only have they found that they can carry a 
greater amount of goods in shorter time, but they have found 
that in dealing with the suburban tradi the commercial au- 
tomobile gives them better accommodations than the railroads. 

An automobile can be sent out at any time, and worked on 
any schedule, but the business man, if he depends on the rail- 
roads, must comply with the schedule of the company through 
which he ships. Becaube of this fact, the motor trucks have not 
only displaced the horse and wagon in the larger .stores and com- 
mercial houses, but is even superceding the railroad for short 



STRENGTH RAHWeNDURANCE 




THE strength and endurance of AJAX TIRES 
res! upon the solid and substantial character 
of their construction. 

Every ounce of rubber, every inch of fabric, every 
ingredient that enters into their manufacture i s 
scrupulously scrutinized. The finished tire is sub- 
jected to expert examination before it is allowed to 
leave the factory. AJAX workmen are among the 
most skillful and highest paid in the tire industry 

Severed teste for years on racing tracks, country 
roads, and city streets have demonstrated the unfailing 
superiority of AJAX TrRES. 

The Only Tires in the World Guaranteed 
for 5,000 Miles or 200 Days' Service 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER CO. 

544 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Factories: Trenton, N. J. 

BRANCHES: 

New York City. Philadelphia. Boston, Portland (Ore). San Francisco. 

Los Angeles, Seattle, Minneapolis. Kansas City, Milwaukee. 

St, Louis. Chicago. Atlanta, Detroit, Denver 






July 'J, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



distance hauls. The ears have proven their ability to carry 
groceries as well as large steel moldings, in ve demoi - 
that they can cany dry-goods is the same careful mann 
I metals. 

* * * 

A leading manufacturer of motor trucks, who was 
the city, made the following statement regarding popularity of 
the motor-driven vehicle for business purposes throughout the 

I B 

"One of the principal assets in favor of the motor car is thai 
no matter what time of the day or night a merchant is in need of 
service all he has to do is to jump into his car and he is off. And 
no horse to be hitched up. Al everv minute of the day il is ready 
and capable of doing any amount of work, and it can do that 
work in a shorter time than the horse. But the motor driven 
commercial wagon has not only come into popularity among 
stores. Its use has become universal amoug all kinds and con- 
ditions of business and commercial houses. 

"Breweries, for instance, have found that there is absolutely 
no comparison between the motor truck and the horse and wagon. 
With the great weight which they are forced to carry on one 
delivery, the horse was found unable to cope with the amount 
of work which was required of it. Deliveries could be made 
only -with a large number of trips, which were found to take up 
entirely too much time. The invention of the motor truck was 
the solution of a difficulty which was increasing with these firms 
each year. Thousands of pounds more can now be carried by 
the motor trucks, and it can be done with considerable more des- 
patch than was done under the regime of the horse. For this 
reason, the motor truck has become almost a commercial neces- 
sity to the breweries. 

"Bakeries have found the automobile delivery wagon more 
acceptable than the horse because of its speed. They can de- 
liver their pastries in better shape than under previous condi- 
tions. Large steel works and builders of heavy machinery have 
found the motor truck of great advantage because of its power. 
Heavy eastings that could barely be moved by a team of horses 
aTe delivered in quick shape by the motor truck. Willi ils power 
to do work unlimited, the motor driven vehicle has supplied a 
much needed necessity to these concerns. 

"Because of its speed, it has come into popularity among a 
large variety of retail concerns. Jewelry stores, shoe shops. 
haberdashers, confectionery shops, etcetera, have found that 
their deliveries, which are light but many, can he economically 
despatched by the motor driven delivery wagon. Perfectly re- 
liable, faster, able lo do three times the work of a horse, it is 
but natural that the leading commercial houses of the country 
are adopting lie motor-driven vehicle for exclusive use, and 
again from ils economical standpoint in that il displaces n greal 
number of horses and wagons, Hie motor driven vehicle solves 
the much-mooted delivery problem, and b noes a business I 

trade necessity. 

"In Sau Francisco the motor truck is sure to be the one im- 
portant factor to the automobile trade during the coming decade. 
The big Eastern cities found the horse-dra^i n vehi le clearly too 

expensive to compete with the motor-drivei pance. 3Tei 

oui here 1 find the hoi qi I hod di idedly more 

expensive than in the East. Under such a condition the demand 
for motor trucks here ia bound to be big -larger even than it has 
now grown in the East. The inefficiency of the railroad freight 
service between interior towns of the State also will call many 

trucks into service, This is the source of demand - Ij at all 

experii oeed in the East." 

* * * 

Mr. Perry Hi;ilt. of Grafton, Cal., is visiting in I 
several days. Mr. Hiati is the owner of a Rambler Model 55 
seven-|i . . ar, which he has driven all oyer the Sacramento 

Valley, covering seme LOOP, miles without a expense 

either for repairs or tires. The remarkable part of bis driving 
is that his tires have in them the original Kenosha air. as 
bad no punctures OT any lire trouble of "any kind. Mr. Hiatt 
wears a smile o ■ on thai does not come off. of course 

.1 Rambler booster. 

* » » 

"1 don't see how you make your butter.'* Brown said to the 
modern farmer. "I've been around your farm for a wi 
now, but 1 haven't seen a sign of a churn." He laughed pleas- 
antly, pan I of Brown's stupidity and partly because 



of his bu i ess in ' Oh, my si heme 

neb," be explai !. "All I have to do is to lake a Hi 

villi a bucket of 



Motors That Pass in the fight. 

\ on ni;i\ u rite of i he ships I hal are passing 

Bach other in darkness and gl i, 

I Inseen and unsought, with uever a though! 

For the derelicts drifting to doom ; 

But even if swiftly they're passing, 

They'll glide silently out of your sight, 

So give me the crash and the clatter and dash 
Of the motors that Pass in the Night. 

And here's to the song of the siren. 

The far-grouping gleam of the light, 

And the fumes that arise, the dust in our eves. 
From the Motors that Pass in the Night! 

0. -I. Allen in Smart Set. 




FREE UNTIL AUG 1 

New Automobile Road Map 3x4| ft. 

100 Miles Around San Francisco 

SCALE: 4 miles lo 1 inch 



Just published. Shows the following features: 

1. All main roads in heavy black lines easily found. 

2. Secondary roads in lighter lines. 

3. Township and section lines. 

4. Early Mexican Grants or Ranchos. 

5. All Railroads, including Electric Roads. 

6. Area flooded by Sacramento River in January, 1909. 

7. TJ. S. Forest Reserves. 

8. Rivers, Lakes, Towns, etc. 

9. Guide Arrows at margin indicating where all roads lead, 

with adjacent largest town, indicating distance and 
direction. 
Pocket Form, on Parchment .... $2.50 

Send $4 for One Year's Subscription to the San Francisco 

News Letter and get this Auto Map in Pocket Form 

FREE 

Fill in this form and send to office 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



773 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Please send San Francisco News Letter to the following 
address for One Year for which I agree to pay Four 
Dollars on delivery of New Auto Map as described above 



NAME- 



ADDRESS- 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910 




' Thomas 70 h. />■ Police Patrol, Cincinnati, Ohio, fitted with 
a.rJ/0 Fid- bolted-on tires, and tin 1 Fish removable rim. Tliis car 
can be changed <nl<> am ambulance. 

A remarkable testimonial to the safety and perfect utility of 
the Fisk Quality Bolted-on Tire used in combination with the 
Pisk Removable Rim is found in the general adoption of this 

equipment for motor five apparatus, ambulances, e rgency 

wagons, taxicahs, etc., in all parts of the country. The I isl 
Rubber Company at Chicopee Palls. Mas-., is every day receiv- 
ing photos of wagons in strenuous municipal work, which are 
lilted with nothing but the Fisk equipment. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company has just been advised that 
Sherwin and Williams of Chicago, the largest paint concern in 
the world, has taken delivery of a number of Wilcox trucks. The 
order was placed only after every truck on the market had been 
tried out. 

Recently, when the Indianapolis 'trade Association wanted 
to tour the State of Indiana in efforts to boost the capital among 
the buyers in the smaller towns, the efficiency of the automobile 
was clearly demonstrated. Former Mayor Charles A. Book- 
waiter rode in the patlifinding ear. which blazed the trail over 
more than 500 miles of various roadways for the other five cars, 
donated by Will H. Brown, vice-president of the Overland Auto- 
mobile Company. 

The other boosters rode in two private interurban cars. Thirty- 
five of the business seekers rode in the Overland cars. Those 
traveling by the "gasoline route" were first to ever stop, always 
beating the interurban from fifteen to sixty minutes. This . i < 
those in the motor cars not only the invigorating pleasure of 
the ride overland, but the advantage of having more time to make 
calls at every stop. 

Stops were made at Logansport. Warsaw, South Bend, Wabash. 
Kokomo, Marion, Tipton, Elwood, Elkhart and several other 
hustling Indiana towns. The Overland ears were driven by 
testers from the factor}'. They did not have one bit of trouble 
with the machines, never ran in low a single lime, and every car 
was voluntarily sold to members of the boosters party before they 

returned home. 

* * * 

On the Atlanta to New York tour, John J. W Isiile of At- 
lanta wires from Philadelphia as follows: "Hurrah for the 
Thomas Flyer. Model 'K' has brought us here in good shape, has 
given us no trouble. Heavy rains for several days has made much 
of the roads almost impassable. The clay roads over the moun- 
tains of Virginia caused us to he penalized, the roads being very 
narrow and skiddy, with many slow cars ahead of us. which 
not give us the right of way without danger to themselves. For 
this delay the Thomas was not responsible. It will always be 
my pleasure to speak a good word for the best car on the market, 
which I know the Thomas to be." 

* * * 

A. P. Williams and Thomas W. Castello, two prominent auto 
owners, have recently equipped their cars with Morgan & Wrighl 
Nobby Tread tires. Mr. Castello drives a Chalmers "30." 

* * * 

Still Consuming. 

This self-same young man of Racine 
Who owned the racing machine, 

Has his wife out at work 

As department store clerk. 
For he's still burning up gasoline. 



'•"Dear me." sighed the fond mother, "I don't know what tin- 
children of the future are coming to. I bought my youngsters a 
toy automobile and they ran over the cat, smashed two vases 
and rubbed all (he paint from the parlor chairs." "Bui I 
thought you took the automobile away from them." "So I did; 
and now they have bought a toy aeroplane and scraped all the 
paper oil' the ceiling and upset the canary's cage." — Chicago 
News. 



LOZIER 

Legitimately 

High-Priced 



The LOZIER MOTOR CAR has 

been for years past the highest priced 
of American cars. That it has been 
legitimately high priced is proven by its 
steady growth in popular favor among 
those whose experience with Motor 
Cars enables them to judge intelligently 
as to REAL AUTOMOBILE VALUE. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



724 to 732 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco 



Splitdorf Magneto 

A Double Winner in the 
New Jersey Endurance Run 



Seldom has there been a similar contest of equal 
hardships and difficulties. 'With hills well nigh un- 
negotiable — through a cloudburst, tornado and pelt- 
ing hailstorm, the SPLITDORF equipped Jackson 
and Maxwell cars came in with flying colors and 
won a Perfect Score in their class. 

Does not such proven Efficiency and Reliability 
convince you that your car should be equipped with 
a SPLITDORF without delay? 

G. F. SPLITDORF 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 
520 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 



I 0, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



".Motor car builders are turning their attention to the women 
driven of America/' s;»j's 11. o. Harrison. hai 

that women not only undei itor cai ighly, bul are 

pert wheelmen as are the men. Be< iu Pact, a i or 

that is Basil; cranked, whose tor is flexible tntl which i 

trolled easily, ia a better seller than the car thai onlj an expert 
driver can handle." 

Harrison is Western representative for the Peerless a i 
itt lines. Ha has made a thorough -hnl;, of the motor car situa- 

ib and as a result of his timely hint, the Peerless pedpl 
the first manufacturers of high-priced cars to turn oul a left- 
hand drive car. This feature appeals particularly to the women, 
and knowing this, Harrison enabled his factor} to be 
ahead of the times. There are to be at least four times as many 
Left-hand driven Peerless ears this year as last, Harrison says. 

* * * 

The growing use of so-called pleasure ears for strictly com- 
mercial purposes have been a most important feature in this 
Beason's increased automobile demand. Practically every large 
mercantile establishment that employs traveling salesmen has 
furnished them with automobiles. 

But recently the Sherman & Clay Company, the well-known 
piano dealers, took delivery of two Hudson runabouts for use of 
their salesmen. They appreciate the fact that the salesman's 
efficiency is increased through the saving of time that the motor 
ear insures. Because of its superior speed over both horse and 
buggy and street-ear, it enables the salesman to make more calls 
a day, and consequently care for a larger volume of business. 
II is also found that the automobile is more economical from the 
point of view of running expense. 

* * * 

A succession of hill-climbing victories, won by the Oakland in 
every part of the couutrv this season, was very fittingly crowned 
by the sensational victory, recently recorded, at the famous 
Giant's Despair climb. This hill, which is situated iu the heart 
of Pennsylvania's mountain , is the most difficult of all the big 
national hill climbing courses, and each year those interested in, 
auto competitions direct their attention to this event as the final 
test in hill climbing meets. The Oakland's victory was won in 
a most decisive manner, there being no possibility of questioning 
its superiority. Its time of 2:11 2-5 set a new record for its 
class, as well as beating the next fastest time of the day by 3% 
seconds. 

Will M. Cressy, ihe Rockefeller of the vaudeville stage, has 
been spending bis vacation in Southern California and Mexico in 
company with his wife ami friends, traveling 3ome three thousand 
miles iii liis Rambler automobile, lie visited the City of Mexico 

anil all points of interest en route. On this trip Mr. Cressy has 

taken some three hundred photographs. Mr. Cressy also reports 

that on this trip he had hut one puncture, ami the expene 

repairs on his car was live cents. In consequence, Mr. Cressy is 
a. Rambler booster. 

* * * 

Howe Sanderson, secretary of the California Truck Co., of 
Los Angeles, accompanied by his wife; arrived in San Francisco 
the latter part of las! week, having toured up from the southern 
metropolis in b Hupmobile, Mr. Sanderson came up by th 

ley roads, and after a - 'I visit, Intends driving bacl by the 

coast route. The Hupmobile came up with a perfect score, and 
proved itself tic ideal economy car for two passenger touring 

purposes. 

* * * 

The winner of the third annual Owners' Reliability Kun of the 
Automobile Club oi St. Louis, a Locomobile driven b; 
11. Semple, was lifted with Fisk Equipment, e tot have 

the slightest tire trou start to finish. The test was 110 

miles in length, and was held over roads in wretched condition 
vain. The other car in the run. lilted with Fisk 
Ugh with no tire trouble. 

* * • 

Mr. .1. P.. Sanfm-d, pre-. Despatch Democrat a 

1'kiah. has arrived in town in his Chalmers car. having run it 
two thousand miles since taking irly part " 

May, without even s,, much as a puncture. U 
climbed hills near his home which a horse and buggy cam 
make. 



SOME people have TIRE TROUBLE, others buy and use the 
LITTLE WONDER VULCANIZER having detachable moulds which fit 
the size of their tires and is guaranteed to do perfect work, heated by 
electricity. Alcohol or Acetelene Gas taken from tank or generator. 
Price of iron Vulcanizer, nicely nickel-plated $6.00, price of solid alumi- 
num Vulcanizer $7.00. 




PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 

DISTRIBUTORS 
SO VAN NESS AVE., SAN FRANCISCO 



Have your automobile work done by a Reliable Firm. Cars 
wired for ele<5lric ligrhts. All work guaranteed. No "overchirge" in 
this establishment. 

INDEPENDENT GARAGE 

BRANCH OF 

INDEPENDENT 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

Direc5lors— S.H.Horne, President; F.W.Dohrmann,Jr.,Vice-Pres.; 

J. M. Carlson. Sec'y and Treas.; C. M. Fickert. Dr. Kaspar Pischel. 

381 FULTON ST., San Francisco. Cal. S. H. HORNE, Manager 

Phone Market 2196 




Expert Work on Auto 
Tires and Tubes. 

Compressed Air an 
Tap at the Curbing 



PHONE 

FRANKLIN 3727 



616-618 
VAN NESS AVENUE 



A Perfect Score 

FOR THE 

SPLITDORF equipped Reo and Mitchell Cars 

IN THE 

New York— Atlanta Reliability Tour 

Only the Best and MoS Dependable Ignition 

enabled these cars to achieve this splendid 

result. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 VAN NESS AVENUE San Francisco 



The Hill Climbing 
Car 



(T!>LVA\BV>S 
V ELECXRIC 



BAY CITIES ELECTRIC CO. 



1554-56 Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 1275 



1760-62 Telegraph Ave,. Oakland 
Phone Piedmont 203 



Vulcanizing 



PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Nesa Avenue. 



•an Francleco, Cal. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 



Tips to Automobilists 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tou rists will do well to cut this list out and keep it as a guide'- 

~~ SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

14-MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's- Cabin." Automobile Supplies and Re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

SAN MATEO. — Brown's Garage, 3j0 B street. Phone Mateo 67. 
C. J. Brown, Prop. Open day and night. Expert automobile re- 
pairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 

NORTH OF BELMONT. — Cypress Lodge. First-class mixed drinks. 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties . CHAS. P. HOWKE, Prop. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
PALO ALTO. — Palo Alto Garage, the only first-class fire-proof garage 
in Palo Alto. 443 Emmerson street (.one and a half blocks .from depoL) 
Expert automobile mechanics. High-grade oils, gasoline and sundries. 
Carah & Schenck, prop. Phone P. A. 333. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at .LETCHER'S New Garage for hrst-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors tor ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and SL James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. (.See under Stockton.) 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

G1LROY, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

GILROY HOT SPRINGS.— Twelve miles of fine, good road from Gilroy. 
Just the place to bta> over Saturday and Sunday. Hot plunge. Good 

fishing and hunting; gasoline and automobile oils. 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout. Telephone 
Main 861. 

MADRON E. — Madrone Exchange. A. Boecker, Prop. Gasoline. Meals 
at all hours. Phone Farmers 03 for special chicken dinner. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 
ALAMEDA— PARK GARAGE. William Higby, Prop. Machine and re- 
pair work. Automobiles for hire. 1600 Park street, cor. Lincoln avenue. 
Park Street Station. Telephone, Alameda 386. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 
UKIAH, CAL. — Ukiah Garage. John Snow, proprietor. Expert auto- 
mobile repairing, Sundries, Oils, Gasoline. Best equipped garage in 
Mendocino County. Open day and night. Telephone 1263. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
CLOVERDALE. — Warren's Garage. Fully equipped blacksmith and 
machine shop. Expert Auto Repairing, Gasoline and Supplies. Open day 
and nighL Phone Main 221. Geo. F. Warren, Proprietor. 

CLOVERDALE.— United States HoteL M. Menihan, Proprietor. Only 
first class hotel in town. Electric lighted. Hot and cold water in every 
loom. Detached baths, special attention to touring parties. Phone Main 
£33. 

SANTA ROSA. — Houts Auto Co., Mendocino avenue, one-half block 
north of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils 
and gasoline. Open day and night. Tel. 627. 

BOYES HOT SPRINGS.— Steve's Grill. The automoblllst's paradise— 
where you can obtalnv the finest and most appetizing breakfast, lunch 
or dinner In the State of California. Special attention given to auto- 

mobilists. Wines and liquors of all kinds. Tel. Sub 64. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT, CAL. — Enterprise Machine Works. H. Slotter and J. A. 
Schneider, Props. Forbes street, between 9th and 10th. Phone 66. Ex- 
pert auto repairing, electrical work. Agents for Panhard Oils and Greases, 

Gasoline, Batteries and Auto Supplies. _^____ 

NAPA COUNTY. 
NAPA. — Elegant roads from Vallejo, through Napa County. The GEO. 
O. REYNOLDS GARAGE. 208 N. Main street. Automobile repairing and 
sundries. Panhard Oil a specialty. 

PETRIFIED FOREST.— Five miles from Calistoga, on the Santa Rosa 
road. One of the world's wonders. Here the eye is attracted and the 
mind is overwhelmed in a bewildering mass of giant trees trampled to 
earth by the forces of early volcanic action and long since turned to stone. 
Good automobile road. J. L NELSON, Santa Rosa, R. F. D. No. 6. 

ST. HELENA.— Philo S. Grant Garage. Phone Main 771. General 
Machinists. Expert automobile repairing. Oils, sundries and gasoline. 
Service at all hours. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 
STOCKTON— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. 30 S. Sutter Street. Most 
convenient location. Best of service. Large stock sundries. Rambler, 
Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Main 287. (See San Jose.) 



AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

444 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Everything for the Auto at Prices which are Right 

Open Evenings Until 9 P. M. Open Sundays Until 3 P. M. 



George M. D. Kelly, of Natchez, Miss., who has been a constant 
user of successive models of the White Steamer since 1903, re- 
cently made a trip from New Orleans to New York that was 
widely noticed throughout the East. The tour was made in a 
White steamer immediately after this season's thaws when the 
mud was at its worst. The car was the first to negotiate several 
of the stretches that it covered last fall. The route taken by Mr. 
Kelly, who was accompanied by a party of four, into Louisiana, 
Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, 
West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York. The 
mileage was further increased by numerous side excursions to 
places of interest en route, such as Mammoth Cave, Wyandotte 
Cave, Luray Caverns. Natural Bridge of Virginia, and the Niag- 
ara Falls. The worst stretch of the course was from Gauley, West 
A'irginia, over the mountains into Virginia. The road here 
traveled was practically obliterated in places, and according to 
local report had not been worked since 1860. Only one other ear 
had ever succeeded in completing this particular run, and that 
was also a White. 



The Sacramento Haynes agency, held by E. H. Tyson, has 
since its establishment a few weeks ago built up an enviable busi- 
ness. Sacramento has taken well to autos this season, and the 
Haynes, notwithstanding its late appearance on the field, is al- 
ready established among the most popular cars in the Capital 
City and surrounding valley. Among the most recent deliveries 
made is that to Geo. \V. Scott, one of the most widely known and 
prominent men in the Sacramento Valley, who lives in Madison, 
Yolo County. Mr. Scott has extensive business interests which 
necessitates his traveling all over the valley, and often to more 
distant points. It is in making these trips that the Haynes will 
give the major portion of its services. 

* * * 

Mr. E. P. Brinegar, of the Ways and Means Committee of the 
Panama Pacific Exposition, has recently received an additional 
$2,500 subscription from the automobile industry. This comes 
mainly from the taxi-cab people. There are still several dealers 
and branch houses yet to be heard from. Mr. Brinegar requests 
that all dealers who have not yet sent in their subscriptions gel 
them to him as soon as possible, as it is desired that the automo- 
bile dealers and allied interests place their subscriptions together. 
This is what is being done by other lines of business. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company is just in receipt of the 
following letter from Mr. E. E. Dow, of the Fresno branch of 
the Cudahy Packing Company: "It might be of interest to you 
to know that I received my first puncture to-day, after driving 
my Chalmers "30" four thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine 
miles. Included in this driving are three hard mountain trips, 
where the roads were very rough and rocky. The car is running 
as good as new, as I will show you when 1 drive it to San 
Francisco the last of next week." 

* * * 

S. G. Chapman has been advised by a telegram from Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, that the big sensation at the Albia automobile race 
meet was the performance of the Oakland car, when it far out- 
distanced the field in ihe second event for $1,000 cars, and set 
a new record for the track. Not only did the Oakland, which 
was recently received in an allotment of regular stock car3 ]jy 
the local dealer, proved itself far superior to anything in its 
class, but also its performance ranked well among the best made 
by the highest-priced cars. 

* * * 

Announcement is made that the Interstate Automobile Com- 
pany of Muncie, Indiana, has been granted a license under Sel- 
den Patent No. 5-19,160. The Interstate Company markets cars 
selling at $1750 and at $2000 Thomas F. Hart is president and 
general manager. The other officers are J. M. Maring, vice- 
president, and Otto Holdren, secretary-treasurer. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

NOTHING BUT THE BEST 

CO. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



CHANSLOR 

Polk and Golden Gate 



& LYON MOTOR SUPPLY 



Joly 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



J. H. Graham, who has been demonstrating the Don-is in 
Sacramento and surrounding territory dun at few weeks, 

has had unusual success iu introducing this cai there. A num- 
ber of deliveries have already been made, and now Graham is in 
San Francisco to take two move machines, botli of which are 
sold. Graham declares that the auto trade is prospering in Sac- 
ramento to such an extent that practically everj dealer finds 
himself far short of allotment. There - iral cry for 

more cars. The farmers are especially heavy buyers, and a sur- 
prising feature in connection with their purchases is that they 
are beginning to demand the higher class machines. 

It was Graham who drove the Dorris in the notable Folsom 
to Lake Tahoe race and set a new record, making the 62 miles of 
mountain road in two hours and twenty minutes. After the 
race, L. B. Harvey, of Sacramento, presented the Leitch Drayagc 
and Warehouse Co., who owned the car, with a perpetual chal- 
lenge cup. This cup goes to the first car to beat the Dorris rec- 
ord. Several have already attempted it, but none have nearly 

equaled it. 

* * * 

Through mud hub-deep, and in the midst of a severe hail- 
storm, a Hudson captured first honors in the fifteen hour New 
Jersey Non-Stop Endurance Hun. It finished with a perfect 
score. The distance was 290 miles. News of the Hudson victory 
was conveyed to Mr. E. P. Brinegar, President of the Pioneer 
Automobile Company, in a telegram, as follows : 

"Hudson 'single entry' finished with perfect score, fifteen hour 
New Jersey Non-Stop Endurance Kun. Boad covered with mud 
hub-deep, and during the worst hail-storm seen here in years; 
course covered, 290 miles; most severe test ever held in New 
Jersey, and probably in the East. Hudson was the only perfect 
score car to comply with New Jersey laws regarding non-use of 
chain, and finished without a puncture. Most notable feature of 
Hudson was its perfect cooling system. Other cars dropped out 
due to over-heating by using first and second, and gears." 

With bright, sunny weather, and road conditions throughout 
the State reported in good shape, local autoists have been tour- 
ing the various sections of the adjacent country during the last 
few weeks in large numbers. The roads to Half-Moon Bay and 
La Honda, which are in good shape, have been dotted almost con- 
tinuously during the past week with scores of tourists and simi- 
lar conditions have existed on the other roads leading to San 
Jose, Santa Cruz, Monterey and other down-peninsula points. 
Marin County, too, has secured its quota of motorists, as did 
Sonoma and Lake Counties. It is variously estimated that the 
number of enthusiasts who are making long trips this year into 
the country is greater than ar any time in the history of the in- 
dustry. 

* * * 

J. W. Shannon, a promineni real estate dealer of Oakland, 

has just returned from a trip mail, in In- iiiinle] 19 tive-pa- 
Haynes touring car. Mr. Shannon made the tour through San 
Luis Obispo to Santa Maria via Santa Barbara. From there he 
went to Bakersfield, and thence over tin' mountains back i" Bizmo 
Beach. From this latter town he made two trips to Paso Robles 
and then came back to San Francisco. The total mileage was 
2500. 

This Haynes is the lirst car that Shannon has ever owned, 
and although he has had i! but about two and a half months, be 
made the entire run without the least trouble. He reports that, 
due to heavy hauling and consequent ruts, the roads in the oil 
districts are exceptionally bad. 

Return was made by the coast route, and here the. roads, for 
the most part are in good condition. The worst stretch en- 
countered was for a run of about live miles from Bio Grande to 
1'izmo Beach. Here the road was in the poorest imaginable con- 
dition. The heaviest grade negotiated was the Templor near 
McKittriek. The car. however, took it with no apparent effort. 



A. ir. Brawner, of S and R. J. Tyson, of Piedmont, 

10th recently equipped thi it b Morgan 

Nobby Tread Tires. 



When the best argument our contempo- 
raries can make for their oil, is that 

"It is the same as MONOGRAM." 
"Looks just like MONOGRAM." 

Why not use that standard of excellence? 

MONOGRAM OILS 

Ask for it. See that you get it. 

NEW YORK LUBRICATING OIL CO. 

GEORGE P. MOORE, Pacific Coast Manager 
586 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 



FOR SALE 

Autocar Runabout 

With top, lamps and generator 
in good condition $200. The 
most reliable of them all. 

453 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 




Thomas B. Jeffery & Company, 117-125 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



"lExtto" Sparking* Batteries 

BATTERIES CHARGED AND OVERHAULED 

ELECTRICAL VEHICLE CHARGING AND REPAIRING 

AUTOMOBILE 'WIRING FOR ELECTRIC LIGHTS 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 630 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Franklin 2772 



Rnichac Back to our old location, 623 8acram«nto Street between 

Hi UMIcS Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets, Chamois, 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning; Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 
Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Saeceeiuiff A. Zellerbicb & Sou 
Z«llerbach Building:. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Street* 



hernia 



For Those Seeking 
QUALITY 
NOT PRICE 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 




be persuaded to join England and Germany, or any other nations, 
for the purpose of standing guard with a eluh over quarrelsome 
nations or peoples. 



Poe an Anglo- 
Germanic Alliance 



The proposition that Great Britain, 

(in-many and the United Slates en- 
ter into a tripartite agreemenl to as- 
sume authority to act as the world's 
peace-maker finds Little favor in the capitals of the nations, even 
in German official circles, where the snggestion is supposed to 
have originated, it is having no serious consideration. It is al- 
ready known that England would refuse to become a party to 
such a proposition, while the public in this country is unalter- 
ably opposed to any sort of alliances with foreign powers that 
might involve us in entanglements with the politics or policies of 
other countries. It is interest Lag, however, to note the arguments 
of a German writer, in which he points oul how such a triple 
agreement would keep the nations at peace by a show of power 
thai would be equal to any demands thai might I" 1 made upon ii, 
but he admits that such concentration of power might and could 
be taken advantage of by three parties to the triple alliance; 

il inate the political world; hold the whip hand over r\n-y 

nation, even to the measure of freedom and personal liberty il 
would mete out to its subjects, and in all respects be a curse 
rather than a beneikeni influence. In theory this German states- 
man's plan has all the essential qualities of a righteous peace- 
maker, but it also has all needed elements to become the gri 
enemy of advancing civilization that the mind of man could 
conceive of. 

A brief analysis of what the concentrated power of Great 
Britain, Germany and the United States would mean as a peace- 
maker, and also their possibilities as war makers: Take the sea 
power alone of the three nations, and suppose them to be concenn 
trated to enforce peace among the nations, or to set sail to destroy 
nations. And remember that all these war implements weri 
created "in preparedness''" to play in the role of "peace-maker." 
Thus Great Britain has -If»S warships "completed and provided 
for," including 108 battleships and armored cruisers; the United 
States has 179 warships, "completed and provided for," including 
50 battleships and armored cruisers; Germany has J33 warships, 
"completed and provided for," including 46 battleship- and ai> 
mored cruisers. These liguivs do not include the smaller craft, 
such as torpedo boats, torpedo boat destroyers, submarines nor 
subsidized liners that could bo converted into commerce il"- 
stroyers in a very little time. A triple alliance between Greai 
Britain, Germany and the United Slates would have a combined 
"peace-making" naval force of 910 warships, 204 of which would 

be battleships ami ar 'ed cruisers. To this "show of power in 

the interest of peace" may be added the laud forces of the 
nations, parties to the "peace compact."' 

Notwithstanding the fact that such a concentration of 
could keep peace in the world, it is also true that such a con- 
centration of power could be a dangerous menace to the inde- 
pendence of the nations, and this latter aspect of the sue., 
alliance in the "interest of peace"' is the one the other nations 
would hang their protests upon, which, in fact, they are already 
doing, but not officially, of course, for such action on their pari 
before the proposition for such an alliance had become a question 
for the consideration of the three nations directly in Lnteresl 
would make them ridiculously apprehensive. But this is not the 
first time that German statesmen have suggested an Anglo- 
Germanic alliance, but usually the ultimate purpose has been 
to bind the three nations in the bonds of mutual commercial ad- 
vantage and joint exploitation of railway and industrial and 
banking enterprises in the Latin-American States, in Asia Minor, 
Africa ami in the Far East. But even such an alliance with 
great Britain and Germany would not be approved id' by our peo- 
ple, much less would they sanction "pooling" flic nation's war 
strength with any countries mcrelv (o stand guard over and qrflj 
pel other nations to dwell in peace and harmony with one an- 
other. The United States is a peace-maker to the extent of em- 
ploying its good offices, but to send our army and navy abroad 
to coerce other countries into the tra-i - of peace and international 
comity is quite another thing. The United States never could 



A movement is on foot in Eng- 
<)i GENERAL Interest. land to secure an international 
agreement preventing the employ- 
ment of balloons or other air craft for war purposes. They may 
be used for making observations, but for no other purpose. 

By agreeing, after once refusing, to join England, France and 
Italy, Russia has probably prevented a war between Turkey and 
Greece. The Cretins now agree to recognize the sovereignty 
of Turkey. 

The Kurds of Asia Minor have resumed the bloody work of 
trying to exterminate the Armenian Christians. 

The Turkish General commanding in Albania reports that 
he has "crushed the rebellion," but for prudential reasons, lie 
will quarter an army of occupation upon the people. 

By permission of the Government, a trust is to be formed in 
Germany with a capital of $150,000,000 to deal in about every 
known commodity, imports and exports, but its tendency will be 
to lower rather than advance the cost of living. 

\u-hia has proposed to Italy that they give up building the 
three Dreadnaughts which they were to build jointly. Tine- arc 
loo hard, Emperor Francis Joseph says. 

King George of England will not be crowned before May. 
1911. [t is not believed that the new coronation oath bill will 
gel through Parliament at a much earlier date. 

Last week the Czar made way with the last remnant of the 
Finnish Constitution by putting the public schools under imper- 
ial supervision. 




Those 

who are 

not smoking 

enjoy yours. 

CAMBRIDGE 
'ii boxes of ten 

AMBASSADOR -,- 
the after-dinner size OOC 



Philip Morris 

ORIGINAL -* LONDON 

Cigarettes 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pure Water for Oakland 
Alameda 

Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 

treated, but bacterlo logically purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 

DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. 11.60 per month. Single I gallon 

bottle, 60 cent*. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Horns A 4112. 
980 45th Street Oakland. Cal. 

ALFRED BANNISTER 

EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

1434 Post Street San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 2871 

Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 
oarry In the puree. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for I Cant* In stamps or coin. F. T. 
Hopkins. IT Great Jones at. N. T. 



Jri.Y 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 






Th® @jp)®iB° Air TlkMitlir® aft CsunMid 

B"5 GRACE MACGo\V\X Cnn 

A mellow half-circle of illumination upon the d 

,i. ' . i ing over a green-brown mound, where richlj "arbed fi»- 
move and speak, enacting a world-old drama such is the 
Betting proposed for the plaj of "David," with which the Forest 

Theatre Dramatic Association will dedicate its open-air tl e 

at Carmel on July 9th. No back-drop, no painted scenerj no 
curtain, will be used, but the players will emerge from the 
darkness onto the lighted stage, ami make their exits in the 
same manner. 

Special music has been arranged for the chanting of the sol- 
diery, the primitive phrases to which the dancers step, and the 
song of the waiting woman, Bllisheba. A conscientious effort is 
being made to hold fast to a big, primitive simplicity in Btaging 
the play, a putting forward which shall fit in with the stagi 
ting, where the intention has been to leave the forest surroundings 
as untouched as possible. A platform for the actors, comfortable 
seats from which the spectators can both see and hear, these 
have been secured, but beyond this the 
beautiful site, a natural amphitheatre, has 
been left as it was. 

Some re-arranging was necessary to fit 
the drama for use without a curtain, but 
a night production, and the skillful use of 
calcium lights has solved the problem. 
The story deals with a nomadic primitive 
people, and it is believed that it will gain 
dignity and verity by this handling. Gar- 
net Holme, who is managing the produc- 
tion, arranged the play for use without 
scenery or curtain, and has given careful 
study to exactness in costuming, and the 
few properties used, leaning always to the 
side of simplicity, and a certain rudeness 
of method as fitting in well with the in- 
tention of the dramatist and the era of 
the tragedy. 

With one exception, the cast has been 
drawn entirely from Carmel, and it is 
fairly representative of the little town by 
the sea. The title rule is played by Her- 
bert Heron, himself a dramatist and poet, 
and an actor of some experience. The 
part of Saul is played by George Manship, 

who attracted SO much favorable notice in 
the recent production of "Nero"' at the 
Greek Theatre _in Berkeley. Samuel, 
High Priest and Prophet, is given excel- 
lent interpretation by Professor George 

H. Boke, of the University of California. 
\;nlali. Captain of Saul's hosts, is Ferdi- 
nand Rurgdorff. whose exhibition of pic- 
hires nf the desert and the sea attracted 
so mm h favorable notice at Vil 
spring, The management has found in 
Carmel two mosi excellent comedians in 
the pel i -i. W. Hand, President of 

the Dramatic Association, and J. F. 
Beck, who handle the fine humorous 
nee of the piece ably and most enjoy- 
ably. Jonathan, a character of great 
sweetness ami beauty in the play, as in 

the Bible narral 11 interpreted by 

Harold Parker, while reman and Aimer. 
Captains in Saul's host, receive adequate 
T. IV Reardon and 
Frederick Leidig. George Bowman, who 
plays a shepherd lad. g iceful, 

dovish reading of the part. 

Michal, 01 the house of 3 

is played by Helen Cooke, selected in the 

for her pictorial fitness for the 

part, hut proving adequate to the very 

ile demands of the character. 

\l'~ i 



t'oa than the 1 

Alice M 

ada" ami '-W h i ;' I. an, 

i capl 
• who cue , h . lose nf the fir 

on the women which has a touch 
ih, a shepherdess, IS taken In Mamie l.v,,ns, whose work iii 

English, ami along ih c lines is well known on the 

Lyons interprets the pari judiciously, .'inn 
al leniinn In detail « lie h eeable. M rs. tl 'ge Ster- 
ling appears among the mourning wo n, her dark beau! 

statcrj bearing Fitting well with the Oriental dress. Bertha New- 
plays the minor part nf Sarah with good finish, and 
Frances Short, as Ellisheba, sings a strange Eastern song with 
tine effect. Dancers, soldiers, captives ami others necessary to 
(ill out the stage pictures, perform their parts ron amore, and 
with an intelligent interest impossible to the paid troupe. 

\\ ilh the able coaching ot' Mr. Holme, (he great natural 
beauty of the theatre site, Hie good, hard work the players are 
putting on their parts, a fortunately selected drama nf much 
merit, and an intention to slight nothing in the way of costume 
or effort, the performance promises to he a memorable one. 




Less Work- 
More Vacation Hours 

Good cooking for sharp appetites, in 
the house-boat — bungalow — camp, with a 
New Perfection Oil Cook-Stove. The 
perfect stove for summer in the house — 
cottage — anywhere. Easily portable. It 

broils and toasts, and, with the New Per- 
fection Oven, bakes and roasts perfectly. Intense 
heat concentrated at the burners — nowhere else — 
kitchen not overheated. 

Convenient, cleanly, economical. Fuel obtainable 
everywhere. No smoke — no odor. No wood to 
chop— no coal to carry. The 

New .Per/get ion 



WICK ULUl FLAME 



Oil Cook-stove 



drop 



has a Cabinet Top with shelf for keeping plates and food hot; 
shelves for the coffee pot or saucepans, and nickeled towel racks. 

It has long turquoise-blue enamel chimneys. The nickel finish, with 
the bright blue of the chimneys, makes the stove very attractive and invites 
cleanliness. ' 

Made wilh I, 2 and 3 burners; the 2 and 3-burner stoves can be had with or without 
Cabinet. Cautionary Note: Be sure you get this stove — -see that the name-plate reads 
"NEW PERFECTION. ' Every dealer everywhere ; if not at yours, write for Descriptive 
Circular to the nearest agency of the 

Standard Oil Company 

(Incorporated) 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 






Enfe*«gSai=fr 



HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 



Bear trie script name of 

Stewart Hartshorn on label. 



I 



Get "Improved," no tacks required. 

Wood Rollers Tin Rollers 



Fire 



Marine 



Automobile 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
Ban Franclaco, California. 



Caih Capital, $400,000. Cash Assets, $970,146 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams. Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man. W. E. Dean, F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, James K. Motrin. J. W. Phillips. Henry 
Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Cash Capital 11,000,000 

Cash Assets 6,966,216 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,790,300 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 11,700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents. 
•10 California Btrest Ban Francisco 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 



BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under ths rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Geo. H Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
112 California St., Ban Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 1181 



PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 

Incorporated 1886 
SURETY ON BONDS 

PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Head Office-FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
FRED B. LLOYD, President 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 1863. , Cash Capital, $1,000,000 

Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico, Insurance against loss 
by fire. Automobile Insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental income by 
Are. 

H. L. ROFF, General Agent J. J. BHBAHAN, Ass't General Agent 

124 Sansoms Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




INSVMCB 




The insurance rate on marines was materially, increased on 
July 1st, and every grain ship leaving the Pacific Coast for the 
United Kingdom, a move taken by the underwriters partly be- 
cause several of the vessels milking up this season's fleet were 
lost before reaching their destination. But the principal reason 
given out is that the marine underwriters have been losing stead- 
ily on many of their risks for the last few years. The new rate, 
going into effect next month, has been fixed at from 2% to 4 
per cent, according to the age of the vessel, as against the flat 
rate of 2^2 per cent now in force. This applies to every sailer 
not exceeding 2,500 tons net register. The steamers will not 
be affected. 

* * * 

Alfred P. Grim, the well-known insurance underwriter ami 
clubman, who dropped dead at the Bohemian Club last week, was 
born in Oakland forty-eight years ago. lie was the son of A. K. 
Grim, auditor of Alameda County, up to bis death a few days 
ago. For many years he had been a prominent figure in tie- in- 
surance world. He was a member of the firm of Conrov & Grim, 
Pacific Coast managers of the Aachen & Munich and Caledonian 
Insurance Companies. He was a charter member of the Family 
Club, and a poet of no mean order. He was a single man, and 
leaves an estate of some consequence. 

* • • 

The Pacific States Fire Insurance Company, of Portland, ha? 
closed a contract with Charles A. Craft, one of the best known 
insurance men on the Coast, for the position of underwriting 
manager of the company. He has resigned his position as North- 
west manager of the fire insurance department of Johnston & 
Higgins, to accept the position. Mr. Craft was formerly with 
the Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific, and was afterward 
special agent and adjuster for the Union Assurance Society and 
the Law Union & Crown, with headquarters at San Francisco. 
Mr. Craft's headquarters have been at Seattle, but he has lived 
at Portland, and is well known there. He is considered a valu- 
able man. 

* * * 

The Life Underwriters' Association of San Francisco are 
making great preparations to entertain'E. R. Machum, president 
of the Life Underwriters' Association of the Dominion of Can- 
ada, who is expected to arrive in San Francisco this week. The 
entertainment will take the form of a luncheon at the St. Fran- 
cis. Mr. Machum has been entertained by a number of Ameri- 
can Associations at various points on his trip to California, and 
is to be given an elaborate greeting at Los Angeles. 

* * * 

After a delay of more than a quarter of a century, the In- 
surance Commissioners of the various States of the Union have 
agreed upon uniform action in framing a tentative bill to be 
presented to the Legislatures of their respective States, embrac- 
ing conditions that place fraternal organizations under like 
supervision and control of and strict accountability to the State 
as govern regular life insurance companies. This, in case of 
its adoption, would officially declare the insolvency of these great 
fraternal bodies within the jurisdiction of the National Frater- 
nal Congress and the Associated Fraternities of America, and 
others disassociated that have more than 8,000,000 life insurance 
certificates in force, upon which more than 20,000,000 bene- 
ficiaries are dependent for relief. 

* * * 

The Commissioner of Colorado will discuss the examination 
of the Pacific Surety Company, now being made by S. H. Wolfe, 
for the Colorado and Minnesota Insurance Departments, and 
which is participated in by the California and Oregon Depart- 
ment. Mr. Wolfe has had his assistants on the work for some- 
time, and arrived two weeks ago to take personal charge. The 
examination was undertaken at the request of President F. B. 
Lloyd of the company. 

The fire insurance companies complain, and justly, of the 
dishonest losses, exorbitant and unfounded claims, and a general 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



desire on the part of the public to get the besl of tho company. 
The courts, naturally, interpret contracts of insurance 
strongly against the insurer. A feeling of antagonism too often 
i -vists between company and claimant. Not until the millennium 
will all these conditions be corrected. 



The trial of M. Donnelly, President of the Ohio German Fire, 

which failed some time ago, leaving not a few of its California 
creditors in the lurch, on a charge of embezzlement at Toronto, 
will go over until fall, but it is said that the forgery trial will 
take place in the meantime. The reason for the delay is that 
there is a case now in the Supreme Court involving the question 
of whether the embezzlement of checks is. the embezzlement of 
money, which is the important point in the Donnelly embezzle- 
ment case. Donnelly is still holding on to his place as Circuit 
Court Judge. 

* * * 

A sane Fourth of July seems to have arrived. Fire insurance 
companies have always dreaded the Fourth. Nobody knows when 
a fire will start or how many are injured during the day. Of 
course, those who can, get out of the city, but many cannot. In 
San Francisco, and, indeed, all the large cities of the country, 
the more dangerous noise-makers have lost their jobs. The fire 
department always enjoys the day after the Fourth. 

* * * 

Substantial reductions in fire insurance rates in Montana have 
been made as the result of tb^e recent visit of Insurance Com- 
missioner Cunningham to San Francisco. In the protected 
areas there has been secured an average reduction of 25 per cent 
on the basis rates for dwellings and contents. This means a 
reduction of 15 cents in Helena, Butte, Great Falls, Billings, 
Hamilton, Missoula, Kalispell, Anaconda and Lewiston. An- 
other concession was secured by Mr. Cunningham on the reduced 
rate average clause in brick mercantiles and their contents. All 
this in addition to the 20, 25 and 30 per cent reductions made 
last fall on dwellings in unprotected towns and in suburban 
property. 



The Monte a Life 1 irganized at 

Hi lena, and claims thai one-half of its capital stock of (500,000 

lias already been subscribed and the balance is in sight. W. (J. 

0i iation, is 
ompanyi3 firsl president, and Frederick \\ it 
ton, who serves the Western stairs of San Francisco in like 
ity, will be the actuary. 



The criminal libel suit of the Pacific Surety Company againsi 

Killlor Fiver lias been postponed to duly 25th. 

The American Druggists' Fire, of Cincinnati, will enter Cali- 
fornia. 

J. J. Kenny, Pacific Coast Manager of the Western and Brit- 
ish America will henceforth occupy spacious new quarters at 129 
Leidesdorff street. 

Howard Brickell is assistant general agent under Edward C. 
Landis of the London Guarantee and Accident. The office has 
been moved to the Merchants' Exchange Building. 

A. M. Shields, the local manager of the Equitable Life As- 
surance Society, wrote with his own hand and collected the pre- 
miums on over $500,000 of insurance between January 1st and 
July 1st of this year. 

George W. Carey, special agent for the Standard Accident In- 
surance Company, is spending his vacation in San Francisco. 
Manager Briggs is in Washington. 

The Aetna Life Insurance Company has published a book on 
the care and operation of elevators that should be in the hands 
of all having anything to do with such machines. Accidents on 
elevators can be prevented if the machinery and general equip- 
ment are kept in good condition, and proper care is exercised in 
their operation, and the many important suggestions in this book 
along this line are valuable. The book will be sent on applica- 
tion. 

John Landers, the veteran manager of the Manhattan Life, 
is in Alaska, accompanied by his daughter. 

Manager Bates, of the Shawnee Fire, has been catching fish 
at Tahoe. 



The fact that $200,000 is NOW being ex- 
pended in building on the Crocker Tract, 
Piedmont, shows how increasingly popular 
is this, the most distinguished and beautiful 
home-park in California. Villa sites-for 
homes to cost from $10,000 to $50,000-for 
sale by Wickham Havens, Incorporated, 
entire top floor, Oakland Bank of Savings 
Building. 



Judk JoEninisoiin si IPir©Ms(t®irn© M@im§ft®ir 



The intellectual sumriority av the black race is proved 

at last. 

From now an thim Brno divorcees will knon hum to con- 
duct family scraps. 

-Manny great writers at Reno produced much mush at tin 

tints per word. 

Th' civilized East will not permit anny prize-fights, but 

th' lynching bee seems to be quite a fashionable affair. 

Misther Jack Johnson had a safe and sane Fourth av 

July. 

The hold accommodations av Reno consisted mainly av 

the shadow av a sage brush for a couch and th' Truckee River 
for a bath tub. 

"Casey," remarked Mrs. Casey, "th' ploom was t rem in jus, 
wasn't it, and what was billed For a greal fight turned out to be 
a holiday f'r th' African. ' 

"Mj jear unman," sai.l Casey, "th' contest was a treminjus 
wan while Hi' fight didn't amount to annything at all. While 
! do not contimplate anny extensive post mortem, t ran ,-j\ thai 
from all the accounts, the best man won. and whin you gel down 
in the facts av the rase, the mosi decent wan a\ the whole bum b 
was th' naygur. II>' was a Link man In a white crowd, ami he 
showed that he had no! only the muscle in his arms, but the grit 
in his make-up that wins anny kind av a fight." 

"I suppose all thim rayporters are glad it's over," said Mrs. 
Casey. 

"They ought to be if they ain't," said Casey, "for while the 
fight was what drew th' crowd, the real battle was between thim 
treminjus intellects who supply us wit' th' day's news." 

"TV general consinsns av opinion maintained by thim hardly 
tallies wit' th' results obtained by Misther Johnson," ventured 
Mrs. Casey, "but the contest among th' papers was a great wan. 
anny way." 

"It was," said Casey. "F'r days before th' fight great writers 
from all over the -world sat up late at night hunting words to 
describe the treminjus ferocity av Jeffries. -Tack London de- 
clared that he was a prehistoric monster wdio pulled up oak trees 
by th' roots and knocked the stars oul a\ the sky whin he became 
inraged. Eex Beach said he was the twin brother av a polar 
bear wit' th' hives hunting a warm spot on an iceberg in the 
middle av winter, and the best prediction of the fight made by 
annyhody was that made by Misther Alfred Henry Lewis who 
studiously refrained from mentioning it in anny manner what- 
soever." 

"Thai was a great story that Misther Lewis told about the 
undertaker and th' tack, annvway." said Mrs. Casey, "and while 
the fact that he knew less about lighting than anny of thim 
would have justified him in writing volumes more, he showed 
great wisdom whin he refrained." 

"And now that it is Ftl] over." said Casey, "there is nobody who 
has a kick coming for guessing wrong. While the purse was 
divided between the naygnr and the while man. the only light 
thai took place was between Jeffries and old Father 'Tine, and 
Time won as he always wins in iverj fight he makes." 

"All thim newspaper reporters wrote copiously about thi waj 
that .Teff looked," said Mrs. CaBey, "and manny a one of thim 
whit broke as a result av the Eeroshus appearance av th' great re- 
tired champion." 

"My dear woman," said Casey, "von can never tell by lo 
at the hind legs av a bull-frog how far he can Imp; you can neves 
iell by looking at the outside av annything what is on the in-ide. 
and while the gold watch wit' cheap works may seem more 
homologous, the silver watch wit' good works is the one thai 
keeps the best time." 

"And th' man who had the punch wifout looking like he had 
it. whipped the man who looked like be had th' punch but didn't 
have it." said Mrs. Casey. "I- that what v' mean!'" 

"Quite literal," said Casey; "and now that it is all over, I am 
glad its done. Wit' slight interruption th' papers have fed us on 
light dope for a year. Th' biographical essays av Sullivan an? 
Sharkey an' Fitzsimmons have put aside the lighter literarj 
efforts iif Kipling and other writers av less note, and the longest 
the light pot boiled, the more room it took up in the papers, un- 
til there was really no place to put anny other news unless it 



was -nine horrible scandal which was needed to edify (he world." 

"Anil there is nobody who has worried about it and talked 
about it more than Casey." said Mrs. Casey, "and I, myself, have 
been quite interested in it. I confess." 

".Mrs. Casey," said her husband, "th" day av lb' prize-fight 
has gone by f'r th' Casey family. I shall no more discuss it wit' 
anny body in anny way, for I am done with it f'r good and all." 

"Casey," said Mrs. Casey, "th" reason why women are faithful 
to men is because they arc such fools. You have thought av 
nothing else, talked av nothing else, and dreamed av nothing 
else for th' last six months but th' fight, and av there was another 
wan to-morrow, J am quite sure that you would caper about in 
lb' same old way." 

"Y're a wise old woman. Mrs. Casey." said her husband. "I 
don't know hut \ should, hut if anny body should lave me pick- 
out the next two lighters that 1 would liki to see engage in his- 
torical combat, T am quite sure tied manny disgusled followers 

av the game would cheer me wildly whin I became a promoter and 
bniiL' up a treminjust purse Eor John I.. Sullivan and Abe 
Aftell." 



TFrHATT TAVERN 

X J_J V-» X 111 \J COR. POWELL and EDDY STS. S. F. 

Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladies' Grill 

Have Secured 

SIGNOR GINO SEVERI 

to conduct: their orchestra commencing April 22nd. 1910 

Concerts daily durine Luncheon, Shopping Hours. Dinner and 
After Theatre 

Special Lunch Served Durinsr Shopping Hours 

Under the management of A. C. MORRISSON 



The New Poodle Dog 

HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 




Bay State Restaurant & Hotel 



OFARRELL STREET 

Serve Excellent 
Special Lunches 
Excellent French Dinner 



NEAR MASON 



50c 
75c 



Hungarian Orchestra, 



12 to 2 p. m.— 6 to 8 p. m. 



MUSIC EVERY EVENING 
French Dinner served with Red or White Wine $1.00 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Phone Kearny 1812 Ladles Grill 



Ji i.y 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 






D®nag 



If I were a bird 1 would ll\ to you, 

If 1 were a wind I woulci sigh to ybu, 

If I — near the place where you passed were n flower, 

['d unfold my petals and bloom al the hour 

\\ hen my fragrance might till the air nigh to you : 

Thus to breathe out my heart and to die to you. 

If I were a star I would glow for you, 

One steadfast small gleam still to show for you; 

And I know that the glance of your beautiful eyes 

Would know me from all other stars in the skies. 

With the wandering mi sinking low for you, 

I would burn all the brighter and glow for you. 

If I were a minstrel I'd sing to you. 

My glad harp with raptures would ring to you. 

If you were a beggar and 1 were a king, 

My majesty all at your feet I would fling — 

Queen's silks and queen's purples would cling to you 

My kingdom its treasures would bring to you. 

Oh, love, take the love that now flows to you ! 
Oh, sweet, hear the song that now goes to you; 
And if it could only but tell you a part 
Of the loving and longing that throbs with my heart- 
Some small part of my loving disclose to you — 
This dull world would bloom like a rose to you. 

— Carl Heinrich, in Smith'* 



The \vaiter who bawds out his order to the cook in the 

kitchen may soon he as extinct as the dodo; but his cries should 
live forever. ''Mutton broth in a hurry," says a customer. "Ba- 
ku in tin 1 rain! Make him run!" shouts the waiter. "Beefsteak 
and onions," says a customer. "John Bull ! Make him a giuny," 
shouts the waiter. "Where's my baked potatoe?" asks a cus- 
tomer. "Mrs. Murphy in a sealskin coat!" shouts the waiter. 
"Two fried eggs; don't fry them too hard," says a customer. 
"Adam and Eve in the Garden ! Leave their eyes open I" shouts 
the waiter. "Poached eggs on toast !" says a customer. "Bride 
and groom on a raft in the middle of the ocean!" shouts the 
waiter. "Chicken croquettes," says a customer. "Fowl ball!" 
shouts the waiter. "Hash!" says a customer. "Gentleman wants 
to lake a chance!" shouts the waiter. "I'll have hash, too," says 
the next customer. "Another sport," shouts the waiter. "Glass 
of milk," says a customer, "Let it rain!" shouts the waiter. 
"Frankfuerters and sauerkraut, good and hot." says ;i customer. 
"Kulo, Shep and a bale of hay!" shouts the waiter, "ami let "em 

sizzle!" — New YniL- h'.i'niuuj Sun. 



Legler, the baker, bent over his counter, working awaj 

with a pencil and a piece of wrapping paper, when j\l is. Liseum 
entered for a loaf of bread. Noticing on the paper a lot of 
familiar names, Mrs. Liseum asked: "What are you figuring 
there, Mr. Legler?" "Well, ma'am," says Legler, "I'm just 
pulling down the names of all my friends that I can lick." "Id 
Harvey Liscum's name there?" asked Mrs. Liseum. "Yes," said 
the baker; "yes, I've got it down." Mra Liseum went home and 
told Harvey. He hastened to the bakery. "Legler," he said, "is 
it true I'm on the lis! of men you can lick?" "Yea," said Leg- 
ler calmly, "I've got you down. Mr. Liseum." "Why, you little 

shrimp." roared LlSCUm, "I could eat you alive!" "Are you sure 

you could?" asked the baker. "You bet I'm sure!' said Liseum, 
shaking his list m Legler's face. "Well, then," said the baker, 
sadly. "1 guess I'll cross vou off the list." — Chicago Evening 
Post. 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco is located at 626 

Merchants' Exchange building, where all business of the Citi- 
zens' Alliance is transacted. The Free Labor Bureau, of the 
Alliance, in Oakland, is at SOI Broadway. All classes of male 
help is furnished, absolutely free, to employer and employee. 



Now is the time to have your carpets cleaned — while away 

on your vacation. Telephone to the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning 
s, 989 Golden Gate avenue (telephone Market 643), and 
they will call for them. You may allow them to remain at the 
works until your return, or ha\e them returned at once, as you 
desire. All work guaranteed. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francisco 



Luxury 

Convenience 

Contentment 



Golden State Limited 



Ask about the low 
rate round trip 
tickets East: on sale 
certain days May 
to September, 1910 



Southern Pacific-Rock Island 

Ticket Offices: 

Flood Building, 882 Market Street, Market Street Ferry Depot 
Third and Townsend Sts., Depot 

' Broadway and Thirteenth Street, Oakland 



IT IS IGNORANCE THAT WASTES 
EFFORT." TRAINED SERVANTS USE 

SAPOLIO 



38 



San Francisco News Letter 



.li I.-, 9, L910. 



TE® C@nnv<mi.@ifii& Exans© 



"It's awful sweei of jrou to think of it. and I should love to 
go if I were well," said Mrs. Buckley over the telephone. "Oh, 

no, nothing serious, but I don'i feel quite able to go out 

Oh. yes, I shall Ik' all right in a day or two. Thank you so 
much for asking mo. Oood-bye." 

Mrs. Buckley hung up the receiver witli a sigli of relief. ''I'm 
glad 1 had the presence of mind to decline." she -aid to herself. 
•i don't care at ad for a stupid drive with Mrs. Drake. Besides, 
with tlie Hendersons coming to dinner to-night I've got too 

much to do this afterr n to waste time going round the park 

behind her old slow-coaeh horse-." 

* * * * * * 

Two hours later .Mrs. Buckley was insisting the conk in the 
manufacture of a wonderfully complicated dessert when her 

husband hurst into the room with an anxious I'rnw his 

brow. 

"I've been looking all through the house 1'or you, Nan." he 
sail!, a little impatiently. "1 didn't expect to find you in the 
kitchen." 

"Why not? How 'lid you happen to come home so early. 
Tom ?" 

"1 heard vim were ill." 

"III! Why, I'm not a hit ill." 

•■Sn I sec/ Hut 1 met I Irake at lunch and he told me you iverc 
so sick you couldn't go out tor a drive with hi- wife. 1 naturally 
thought von had some sudden attack and no one had had sense 
enough to call me up. so I rushed home." 

"You poor old dear." Mrs. Buckle} laughed indulgently, as 

she continued to whip cream. "I had no idea you were so easily 
alarmed." 

"Am- one would have been alarmed. by what Drake said. How 

in the world did he ever get the idea that you wire sick?" 

"Mrs. Drake telephoned me this morning, asking me to go 

driving, and as I didn't feel like it. 1 said I wasn't well." 

"Oh. that's it'r Why didn't you say you didn't feel like it?" 
"You know you can't say such things. Tom. ' 

"Well. 1 rather thin 1 .- I can. However, since you're in no im- 
mediate danger. I'll console myself with a little golf the resl of 
the afternoon." 

"Very well, hut come home early. You know the Mender " 

Mr.-. Bucklej ceased speaking a- the door closed none too gently 
behind her husband. "Any one would think." she smilingly 
mused, "that Tom was disappointed because i'm not sick." 

At 6:30, after an extremely busy afternoon. Mrs. Buckley 
was dressed and waiting for husband and guests. 

"Why in the world doesn'i Tom come?" she fretted. "He'll 
surely keep dinner wailing while lie's changing hi- clothes." 

At ; o'clock neither lie nor the expected guests had arrived, 

ami Mrs. Buckley, tired and nervous, walked the floor oi 111 r 

flower-bedecked rooms. 

"Well, here you are at last," -he cried, a- Buckley appeared at 
7:30. "What detained you? Tie been almost wild." 

"1 didn't sii|i|iose you'd worry. .Van. You see, we started a 

foursome so late that " 

"But you knew yon had to dress for dinner. Tom!'" 
"Dress for dinner;' To-night ?" 

"Yes. of course. You know as well as I do that the Hender- 
sons are coming. I can't understand why they're 80 late, [fa 
inexcusable. I'll think twice before I invite them again. I n 
should have been lure an hour ago." 

"But. Nan, they aren't coming." 

"Aren't coming? What makes you think they're not coming?" 

"Well, you see, after I left Drake to-day 1 ran into Henderson 
mi! I told him I was hurrying home because you were ill. lie 
said he'd telephone his w ife thai the dinner was off. li was 
thoughtful of him. wasn't ii ?" 

"Oh. very!" Mrs. BucWey spoke with much sarcasm. "It 

would have been very thoughtful of you to have menti d n me 

that the Hendersons were not coming. Perhaps you think I like 
to work all day ui'tiin<_ r up a dinner for people who aren't com- 
ing." 

For ; in' ii t Buckley looked a little crestfallen. Then, unk- 
ing a strong recovery, he said boldly: "But, my dear girl, I 
was so delighted to find von weren't sick thai the sense of relief 
drove every other thought out of my head." 

"Except the thought of golf." 



hac 

am 

sin 

"A 
rav 



Wain Buckley looked somewhat nonplussed, but in an instant 

rallied. 

■Dang it all. Nan, we wouldn't have had this muddle if n'oii 

I told Mrs. Drake the truth in the first place." 

'I can promise one thing. 'Thomas dear: I won't indulge in 
thor innocent fabrication very soon if I think there's the 
htesi possibility of its falling into your clumsy keeping." 
Well. then, truth is once more triumphant." laughed Tom. 

nd your company dinner won't he wasted, my dear, for I'm 

nous." — Chicago Daily Nevis. 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



Plan to spend your vacation in 
California's Wonderland 



GOOD HOTELS— BOARDING CAMPS- 
PRIVATE CAMPING- 



Your choice at reasonable rates. 



Conditions are ideal for Rest and Recreation — 

Daily outings to points of interest 
Jolly times around the evening camp-fire. 
The best of society: congenial companions. 
ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER. ANY 
Southern Pacific or Santa Fe ticket agent, or 
O.W. LEHMER, TRAFFIC MANAGER, Y. V. R. R., Merced, Cal. 




City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately, 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. ^^^ 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlut, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 408 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and MarksL 

ATTORNEY8-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney -at -Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. RIegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and in-growing nails cured by a special and palnlesB treatment. 
206-206 Westbank Building, 830 Market street, San Francisco. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Teleaxaph Poles, Shingles, Split Shakes, Etc. 
Main Office — Crocker Bide., San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 



New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



Flags, Tents and Canoes 

CAMP FURNITURE and GARDEN HOSE 

If you want Quality and Lowest Prices, call at 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON CO. 

51 Market Street San Francisco 



ASK YOUR 
DEALER FOR 

GOODYEAR 

"HIPPO" 

HOSE 




GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
. H. PFASE, Pres: 589. 591. 593 Market St., S. F. 



Ibe Best and 

Strongest 
Garden Hose 

Guaranteed to 

Stand ;00 lbs. 

Pressure 

Try It and Be 
Convinced 



July 9, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 







TO FISKE O'HARA. 

All gayety and grace arc yours, 

The laughing Irish eves. 
The ready kiss, the voice that lures. 

The mischievous replies, — 
Hut when yen suil: out clear and bold, 

The hangman came between, 
And faint 1 turned, and sick and cold, 

At "The Wearing of the Green." 

Some fibre in my brain awoke, 

A memory, a breath, 
The heritage of hunted folk 

To whom that song meant death — 
Mine own they were, and for their sake 

I shook with fears unseen. 
And wept as though my hearl would break 

At "The Wearing of the Green!" 
— Julia Ditto Young in Catholic Union and Times. 



ST. LAWRENCE. 



Dearesi to me of rivers! Prince of streams. 
Magnificent, upon whose breasi there gleams 
A vesture rich nasi speaking, dazzling beams 
01' molten gold and silver, and a blaze 
Of mingled diamond and sapphire rays — 
Mark why I hive thee! Thy most noble name 
I ' nln in v i ImnvJii long years ago became 

The sweetest utterance that lips could fn i, 

And ever since f find the type in thee 
Of all I'd have thy human namesake lie. 
Oh, may the future granl this precious lite 
Like thine may rise above ignoble strife. — 

May it beneficently, calmly Sow, 

Majestic, ample— may ils borders grow 

In gracious gr< ---and may good actions sow 

1 1- course as thick, St. Lawrence strong ami f 
As are the topaz dimples si rev n o'er thee ' 

— Julia Ditto 



omtij. 



r [STLES. 
Wlial castles you'vi bnill of glil ter ami gill 

Ami many a radiant line ! 

With Hope as i prop you builded them up 
Expecting \ our dreams I" come t rue. 

Bui ■ ■ mi in. i 'vi - Li ii- . .i i i \ i hanged into 

Like 'he iin-i "I a rainbow b ind, 
Viiur hopes wouldn't stay and your dreams fell away 

'Neal ii the toui h ol Reality 's wand. 

oh, what was the use and what the excuse 

For spinning sm h gossamer stuff, 
If Pate with a wink can cause them to shrink, 

( >r whirl them awaj with a puff? 

All. nc\ i . a man sit : in 

Was better than dreams of his youth, 

Anil the higher we build and the brighter we gild, 
The nearer we come to the it 

— William I'. MrComrnck in - 



MILKWEED. 

\ sp is ol color, ruby-brighl : 

i pods of silken down, milk-white: 
Small seed hv erran 

irronaut. 

// 



\ 




/ 



CURES 



s 



•HEADACHES 

104,25* 50* &$iqp Bottles* 



\ 



BUNGALOW TO LET IN ALAMEDA 



Furnished Mission Bungalow of 8 
rooms, sleeping-porch, garage, sun- 
parlor, and large garden; 25 minutes 
to the city. 1515 4th Street corner 
Haight Ave., Alameda, Phone 2828. 



if California Door Co. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

DOORS, SASH, BLINDS 

Large and Complete Stock at 
LOWEST PRICES 



Phone Kearny 2010 



SAN FRANCISCO 



43-49 Main Street 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 



Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M 
and by appointment 



Phone Doutrlaa 4138 



Galen Bids.. 391 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 



-10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 9, 1910. 




BANKING 



Phyllis — Have you ever been disappointed in love? Doris 

— Yes; two and a half times. Phyllis — How's that? Doris- 
Been married twice, and once mv lover went off with another 
girl." 

Howard — When Dr. Incision operated on me lie left a 

pair of surgical scissors i j anatomy. Can I sue him for dam- 
ages? Lawyer — Better just send him a large bill for storage. 
— Life. 

Irascible Old Geni (to sol 1 girl who has collided with 

him) — When y 'un into people like that, you should say, "I 

beg your pardon." Girl— There weren't no Deed. 1 heard what 
vhii said. — Sydney Bulletin. 

Nurse— 1 cannot allow butter and jam. i"". on 3 : 

bread, Master Alfred, ft is very extravagant. Master Alfred— 
li can't be extravagant. Mary, if the same piece of bread doea 
for both. — Bed Hen. 

Little .lark Homer sal in a corner, 

Piled up with cushions high : 
Mr stole him a kiss from-a most charming miss, 
And exclaimed: "What a great boy am I !" 

Little Edward, a,ee«t four, was an only child, lie was 

anxious for a bahy sist'-r. and was talking of it one day with a 
friend of the family. In the friend's family was a baby girl of 
one year. The lady said: "Edward, you may have my baby; 
she 1- pretty and sweet." "Oh." said Edward. "1 don't want an 
old halo. T want a bran new one wif nofrin on hut talcum pow- 
der." 

Richard Le Gallienne, the poet, was entertaining a group 

of magazine editors at luncheon in New York. To a compliment 
upon his fame. Mr. Le Gallienne said lightly: "Hut what is 
poetical fame in this age of prose? Only yesterday a school- 
boy came and asked me for mv autograph. T assented willinglyj 
And to-day at breakfast time the boy again presented himself j 
•Will you "give me your autograph, sir?' he said. 'Rut,' said f, 
T gave you my autograph yesterday.' 'T swopped that ami a 
dollar,' he answered, 'for the autograph of Jim Jeffries.'" — 
New York Tribune. 

Her dearest friend sighed softly. "Are you not worried 

about your husband?" "Of course Em horribly worried." "Vmi 
know how In' attracts other women?" "Yes, yes." "Some <>f 
your best friends, too." "T know, I know." "And what are yoij 
going in 'In aboul ii ." "What can I do? If he wasn't consicM 
creel attractive IM feel awfully hurt. If no woman except my- 
self ever looked upon him admiringly, I'd know f hail drawn a 
matrimonial lemon. Ami while il drives me wild In see Ihnse 
women smile upon him. it would be maddening if they coldly 

passed him by. I want him to he admired — ami I bate it. tops 

s.i what can I do hm anile and suffer?" — Cleveland Plain 
Dealer. 

A poor Jew received a monthly allowance of live dollars 

fr a rich man of (he same faith. The money used to he paid 

to him regularly by the bookkeeper. On one occasion when (he 

I ■ man came around, the bookkeeper handed him only three 

dollars. The poor man remained standing quietly until the 1 k- 

keeper asked whether there was anything else he wished. "You 
must have made a mistake," he said, "I always get five." "Yes," 
replied the bookkeeper. "Thai has mnv been changed." "Changed 
— why?" "You see, the boss recently married off his eldest 
daughter and he had a great deal of expense, as you may imag- 
ine — the dowry and so forth, yon can easily understand " 

"Yes, yes." grumbled the beggar. "Give your employer my best 

1 in - and I'll him that if he ever marries off another daugh- 
ter, he may do it with his own money, not with mine !" — The 
Maccabean. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY -STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits J10.999.664.Gf. 

Cash and Sight Exchange 9.984.601.71 

Deposits 24.111.867.07 

lsaias W. Hellman, President I. W. Hellman, Jr.. Vice-President 

F. L. Ltpman, Vice-President Frank B. King. - - - Cashier 

George Grant. Assist. Cashier W. McGavin. - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs. Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

lsaias W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrln Leon Sloss F. W. Van Sicklen C DeGulene 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan Hartland Law F. L. Ltpman J. Henrv Meyer 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Chas. J. Deering Wm. Hass John C. Kirkpatrlck 

Customers of Ibis Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 
are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 
B. E. WALKER, President 
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued In denominations of 

$10, $20. $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are "payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all Information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

San Francisco Offlce— California and Sansome Streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,555.093 05 

Deposits, June 30th, iqio 40,384.727.21 

Total Assets 43.108.907.82 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Offlce, or Welts Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President. N. Ohlandi: Firsl Vice-President. Danle) Meyer; Second 
Vice-President and Manager, George Tourny; Third Vice-President, J. W. Van Bergen; 
Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. 
MuMer; Assistant Secretaries, G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. Newhouse: Goodfellow & Eells. 
General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer, George Tourny, J. W. Van 
Bergen, Ign. Stelnhart, I. N. Waller, F. Tlllmann, jr.. E. T. k'ruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2672 Mission street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment or deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Ctement street, between 6th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

French American Bank of Savings 

SAVINGS 10S SUTTER ST. COMMERCIAL 

(Member of Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

Capital Authorized - $1,000,000 

Capital Paid-in 760,000 

Reserve and Surplus 166.874 

Total Resources 5.281.686 

OFFICERS—A. Legallet, President; Leon Bocqueraz, Vice-President; 
J. M. Dupas, Vice-President; A. Bousrjuet. Secretary; John GInty, Cash- 
ier; M. Girard, Assistant Cashier; P. Bellemans, Assistant Cashier; P. A. 
Bergerot, Attorney. 

Safe Deposit boxes for rent. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 



CORNER SUTTER AND SANSOME STREETS 



Capital, %i. 000,000. 



Surplus and Undivided Profits. $1,602,306.02 



SIO. GREENEBAUM, President; H. FLEISHHACKER, Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER, Vice-President; C. F. HUNT, Vice- 
President; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit, available throughout 
tbs world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



to 1480 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting: all Departments 



Ever Seen 
California's 
Holland? 



TAKE 

Southern Pacific's 

NETHERLANDS 
ROUTE 

The Daylight service between 
San Francisco and Sacramento 
via the new steamer"NAVAJO" 

Leave San Francisco 8:00 A. M. 
Arrive Sacramento 6:00 P. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

A DELIGHTFUL SCENIC 
WATER TRIP 

for tourists and auto parties. 

Meals— Beautiful Staterooms and Parlors 



ASK AGENTS 



Pacific Street Wharf, Market Street Ferry Depot, 

Flood Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 




If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
in your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: :: :: :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO. 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



U^ W^ KjJ^ 



A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dommic, situated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hlils of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 











The 

Egyptian 
Cigarette 
oj Quality 

AROMATIC DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PURITY 

♦ 

At your Club or Dealer's or 
TUB SURBRUQ CO., Maken, New York 









TRADE 



N.B. 



MARK 



ISSUED BY AUTHORITY OF 




DEMAND 

THE BRAND 







SHIRTS 

Made in 

San Francisco 

\torn Everywhere 





CAKES 

Puddings, Ice Cream and all kinds of Desserts 
are much more delicious when made with 

BORDEN'S 

PIONEER 

BRAND EVAPORATED 

MILK 

(Unsweetened) 

Best for all cooking where milk or cream 
is an ingredient. Dilute with water to any 
desired richness and use same as "fresh 
milk." 

Convenience, Economy and Better Re- 
sults make the use of Pioneer Milk a 
Valuable Habit. 




Recipe booh for the asking while they last. 

BORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK CO., 

"LEADERS OF QUALITY" 
Est. 1857. 



THE KNOBS WILL STOP YOUR SKIDDING 




MORGAN & WRIGHT 
NOBBY TREAD TIRE 

Patent applied for. 

"Throw Your Chains Away." 
Weinstock, Nichols Co. 

569 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Phones— Market 6000; J Mil 

"WE SELL CONTINENTAL DEMOUNTABLE RIMS." 



me rarmer a uooa Koaas ^.onverr 






Established July 20. 1S56 




Price 10 Gents 



(&?dii#mm Ajtawriiftefc 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, JOLY 16 1910 




I£ Marquise 

Turkish CiGAREnES 




14 Pit rni 



a 



OF A VINTAGE 

10 for 25 Cents 



» 



INVESTORS 

Now is the Time to Buy and 
MAKE MONEY 



READ 



The Signed Statement of WILLIAM IRELAN, Jr., Ex-State Mineralogist 
Regarding PAJARO VALLEY OIL COMPANY'S PROPERTY: 



"I would advise the development of the property, as the deduction from my examination warrants 
the belief that wells put down to sufficient depth would be large producers, as the geological 
conditions tend to prove that oil in large quantities is contained in the underlying sands." 

The PAJARO VALLEY OIL COMPANY is now drilling and seeks the 
co-operation of the investing public. A limited number of shares can be 
had at 20 cents each, until Aug. 15, at which time the price will advance 



For further information apply 



Pajaro Valley Oil Co. 



400 First National Dank Bldg. 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Hotel 

Del Monte 

OFFERS 

MORE TO SEE 

MORE TO DO 
Than any resort in the world. 

Subscribe for the Del Monte Weekly, a guide to 
things worth knowing, doingand seeing in California 

For rates, reservations, etc.. address 

H. R WARNER, Manager 
Chester W. Kelly. City Representative 406 Crocker Bids.. S. F. Kearny 4013 



Hotel Sacramento 

SACRAMENTO, CALA. 

Elegant new flre-proof construction. Service as perfect as 
expert management can produce. 

ALBERT BETTENS. Proprietor. 



CLOVERDALE STABLES 

Finest rigs in Sonoma County. Headquarters for Geyser Stage 
Line. Hunting and Fishing parties furnished with horses, buggies 
and guides. 

H. I. BARKER, Prop. 



RnicftOC Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 

UI UoIICd Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes, Broomi and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets, Chamois. 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM, BUCHANAN. 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 




1 HOTELSAVOY 

SEATTLE 

Twelre Storlea of 
Solid Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, SI. 50 up 





PEPSIN 

GUM 



IUPIRIOB TO ALL 



PARAISO HOT SPRINGS 

CALIFORNIA'S FAMOUS HEALTH AND PLEASURE RESORT 



The Paradise of Automobilists. New 
Boulevard from Soledad to the Springs. 
All roads from Oakland south are now 
in elegant shape for motoring. The 
new road around San Juan Grade is 
now open to the public Special atten- 
tion given to Week End Auto Parties. 
The natural stopping place for autoists 
enroute from San Francisco to Los 
Angeles. Swimming tank, plunges and 
baths, the finest in the West. Waters 
awarded first prize at St. Louis Exposi- 
tion. Expert masseurs. New reduced 
round trip rates $6.35 including auto. 



H. H. McGOWAN, Paraiso, Monterey County, Cal. 




The favorite resort fnr tourists, slght-seers, .health and pleasure 
seekers. A greater variety of mineral waters than any one place 
in the world. The only natural mineral steam and Hammam bath 
having great curative qualities. We guarantee to cure rheuma- 
tism and stomach trouble. All kinds of amusements. Including 
dancing every evening. Table unexcelled. Climate perfect and 
scenery finest In the world. Good hunting and fishing. Rates J3 
per day and $12 to $16 per week. A new auto and stage road has 
been built from HefUdsburg to the Geysers, and on and after May 
15th there will be an auto run in connection with the regular 
stage. C. C. Foss. the celebrated stage driver, will handle the 
stage between Healdsburg and the' Geysers. For further par 
ttculars address R. H. CURRY. Proprietor. THE GEYSERS. CAT,. 



Santa Cruz, Cal. 

The Santa Cruz Beach Company beg to announce 
that the Grill and Cottage City at the Beach will be 
open for the season on May 16th. 1910. 

Automobilists will find accommodations 

Santa Cruz Beach Company 




THE QUEEN OF LAKE COUNTY RESORTS 

Highland Springs 

W, H. MARSHALL. Proprietor. Open the year around. Posi- 
tively the finest swimming tank, mineral springs and plunges in 
this section of the State. Table unexcelled. New and strictly 
first-class management. LAKE COUNTY, CALIF. 



■^vSUsl if 


ALL ROADS LEAD TO 


WmTjz 


Marchand's 


HAYWARDS 


O^Y^^H- • y *"~|L^s 


For years located in San 


S^tM\ k 


Francisco, and for 8 year;> 


at Geary and Stockton, is 


now located tn Haywards. 
The same dinners, the same 


\ ' TX^kl*^.* '$ i ''''!>k ^ 1' 


service as of old. A cele- 


r ^h&xfT/ ^^^i- 


brated chef has been se- 
cured. Gajaee attached. 


' S^^j- 


Gasolina and oils con- 


stantly on hand. Auto for 
hire. 


** * N^PK 


EDDIE MARCHAND 

Manager 



HOTEL POTTER 

Offers a greater variety of recreation 
and comfort than any hotel in the world. 
Maintaining a standard in cuisine and 
service by which others are judged. 

Potter Hotel Company 

SANTA BARBARA 



HOTEL LYNDON 



1 hour and 30 minutes over Bay 
Shore and Mayfield Cut-Off. 



LOS GATOS, 



Cal. 







Opeivcr ilpril S"tl>^. 



SENTINEL HOTEL, Yosemite, 

The Hub of the Valley. Rates $3 to $4 per day. 

Special rates by the week or month. 

Camp Lost Arrow SSJ^emte 

Largest Hotel-Camp on the Coast. 

Rates $2 per day. $12.50 per week. 

Special rates by the month. 

For reservations or other information apply to 

J. B. COOK, Proprietor, Yosemite, Cal. 

or Santa Fe Agents and Southern Pacific Agents 



Castle Crags Farm 



A delightful place to spend the sum- 
mer among the pines near Mt. Shasta. 
Reopened June 1st under manage- 
ment of 



MRS. W. F. MORRIS 
Care Hotel Victoria San Francisco 



Skaggs Hot Springs 

AWARDED FIRST PRIZE 1909. 
Nine miles from GeyserviUe, Sonoma County. Two trains dally 
—fare $4.60 round trip. Including stage. Natural hot mineral 
water at a temperaure of 135 degrees, cures Rheumatism. Kidney. 
Liver and Stomach troubles. Baths free to guests. Swimming 
Hunting, Fishing, Livery. Tennis, etc. Fine orchestra. Table un- 
excelled. Rates $12 to $16 per week. Write for booklet and reser- 
vations to PETER J. CURTIS. Skaggs, Sonoma Co., Cat, or Peck- 
Judah Co.. 789 Market street. 



Napa Soda Springs 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. 
L. Hlrsch and M. C. Dillon, Proprietors. 
Automobile service to springs meets three trains daily. Special 
round-trip fare from S. F. via Montlcello Steamship Co $3 In- 
cluding auto service to springs. A beautiful mountain, health' and 
pleasure resort; newly renovated: hot and cold soda baths- new 
electric light service: bowling: livery and auto service: saddle don- 
keys for children. Write for booklet to L. H1RSCH, Napa Soda 
Springs. Cal. For folder and further particulars. Inquire at Peck- 
Judah Information Bureau, 789 Market street, San Francisco 



Anderson Springs 



LAKE COUNTY, 
CALIFORNIA 



The greatest resort for health and pleasure; the only natural 
mineral steam baths In Lake County. Natural Hot Sulphur and 
Iron Baths. Board— $10 to $14 per week. No extra charge for 
baths. How to reach the Springs— Take Oakland ferry at 7:40 
a. m., or S. P. train to Callstoga, arrive 11:30 for lunch; Spiers 
stage to springs; arrive at Anderson Springs at 4 p. m., distance 
21 miles. Fare, $7 round trip from San Francisco. Address all 
communications to J. ANDERSON, Anderson Springs, Mlddletown, 
Lake County, Cal. 

NOTE B«l route for autos it via steamer lo Vallejo, thence through Napa, Caliitoga and 
Middlelown 



TAVERN A 

TAMALPAIS 

SUMMIT OF 
Mt. Tamalpais California 

STAY OVER NIGHT AND SEE THE SUNRISE 




^ 



APPOINTMENTS, SERVICE and CUISINE UNSURPASSED 

Address: "TAVERN OF TAMALPAIS." TAMALPAIS 

Telephone Mill Valley 83 






Make LAKE COUNTY 



BY THE 

Scenic Route 



The most comfortable way to make Lake County is by Wm. Spier's 
stage line over the best mountain road in Cal. Grand scenery, easy 
carriages; careful drivers; round trip from San Francisco to Harbin, An- 
derson and Mira Vista, 87; to Adams, Seiglers; Bonanza, Hobergs, 
Howard, Astorg, Spiers and Glenbrook, 89. Stages leave Calistoga 
11:30 a. m., Sundays excepted. Half hour for lunch at Calistoga. 
Fifty pounds baggage allowed. Automobiles furnished when desired. 
Tickets on sale at Southern Pacific office. 



Seigler Hot Springs 

Best Location In Lake County. 

Natural hot baths for rheumatism, malaria, etc.: wonderful stom- 
ach waters; Greatest Arsenic Beauty Bath In the State; swimming 
pond. Baths froe. Rates. $10 to $14. I-ivery In connection. Infor- 
mation at Peck-Judah's, 789 Market street, or address W. E. 
CATHIE, Selgler, Lake County. Cal. 



Mountain Home 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains; no better place In Central California 
for hunting, fishing, swimming; table unsurpassed; delightful cli- 
mate; stage at Madrone, Monday, Wednesday and Saturday. Long 
distance telephone. Train leaves city at 9 a. m. Send for souvenir 
of Mrs. Vic. Poncelet, Llagas, Cal. Delightful trip for automobll- 
Ists. Information at Letcher's Garage, San Jose. 





CAMP AHWAHNEE, 


Yosemite 




At the foot of Glacier Point Trail. Opposite Yosemite Falls. 
Every tent electric lighted. The most luxurious camp 
in the Valley. 




W. M. SELL, Jr., Manager 





Gilroy Hot Springs 2 



p„.„* $1200 to $17.50 per week 
Kates. $2 fl0 (o $2 50 per day 



12 miles of elegant Automo- 
bile Roads from Gilroy to the 
Springs. Finest mineral waters and climate in the State. 
THE Place to Spend the WEEK END 

m. j. Mcdonald, 

Proprietor 




EsUMUh«l My lO, t&M 




TER 

Devoted to the Loading Interests of California and the Pacific Coaat. 




VOL. LUX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 16, 1910 



Hi. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market street. San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill. E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter Intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



All that glitters in upper lendom's lis! of divorces and re- 
marriages is not Gould. 

Has anybody around Oyster Kay seen Ballingcr — Ballin- 

ger with the snake-stick in his hand? 

Suppose the American stork is getting lazy : the total 

immigration last year was 1,035,545. 

One difference between Colonel Roosevelt and "the white 

'man's hope" is that the Colonel came back. 

That poor old "has been," Cupid, gets a judicial knockout 

punch over in Reno almost every working day. 

With one saloon for every 206 inhabitants, San Francisco 

seems to stand in no immediate danger of drouth. 

The capital of Afro-America is wherever the Honorable 

,Tohn Johnson happens to he flashing his gold tooth. 

The "soft pedal" Fourth is not regarded with particular 

favor in medical circles, nor in the firecracker factories of the 
Orient. 

Having bade a long farewell to the correspondents, Reno 

turns again to the gentle co-respondent who keeps (he divorce 
mill grinding. 

That Jeffries was a bad loser is the judgment of many 

thousands of good losers who emit shrieks and yells as they pay 
over the money they bet on him. 

Schiaparelli, the astronomer who discovered those canals 

on Mflrs, is dead, bul Professor Lowell, the only other scientist 
who believed in them, still lives. 

Right in the face of gloomy predictions concerning the 

financial situation at the East comes the information that a 
young ladj oi Roeh lorting a $6,000 i 

The "low down" about Chicago is that she is to have a 

subway and when a town gets big enough for a luxury like that 
it .lues not rare much what the census man reports. 

Abe Ruef o ing back to jail because it may shorten 

his life, The reason does not particularly appeal to the judg- 
ini -in of the immunity he betrayed and debauched. 

Brother Hearst is loud for general disarmament and uni- 
versal peace. Very well: let Brother Hearst start the good work 
by throwing away his newspaper stink-pots and mug-guns. 

A romantic young couple in Japan were married after 

death by suicide. The divoro 

main married couples in our own fair land wish that the funeral 

might have preceded the wedding. 



"Our first private citizen," so of us call the Colonel. 

It's a kind of privacy that makes one wonder whether the late 
P. T. Barnum really knew what publicity meant, after all. 

A West I'omi cadet has been dismissed from the academy 

for chewing gum while on sentry duly. Instead of swallowing 
his cud when asked about it, he stuck it in his cheek ami lied. 

Eastern newspapers are full of "Heat I lout's." The mosl 

maddening of them all to the victims inusl be thai one which 
says: "Don't talk or even think about the heat — just keep cool." 

Policeman Wren, continuously engaged in gelling on and 

off the department roster of bibulous delinquents, behaves more 
like the jolly owl than the sober little bird whose name he bears. 

A little band of Massachusetts fanatics waits and watches 

for the immediate coming of the Lord. People who might le- 
gitimately expect a visitation from the Devil arc not so anxious. 

Los Angeles papers say that 300,000 people went from the 

town to the beaches thereabouts on the Fourth of July. Warm 
weather down that way seems to produce a kind of multiple vis- 
ion. 

A Georgia beauty has just divorced her husband, alleging 

among other things that he was jealous of her dog and made her 
give up the poor little canine. Now Beauty may have her Beast 
again. 

The inventor of the hoopskirt died the other day in Eobo- 

ken, aged eighty-three. If masculine curses had any lethal 
properties he would have perished with the first samples of bis 
invention. 

Governor Gillett stops prize-fighting, and Mayor McCar- 
thy goes him one better by stopping prize-fight pictures. Nbfl 
what benefactor of his kind will put the everlasting kibosh on 
prize-fight talk? 

Three New York officials went Balling off Staten Island 

and came back with a weird tale of a sea serpent with a head like 
a turtle, spouting columns of water. Also they brought back 
a large jug, very empty. 

As he watches the colored population of the country mov- 
ing forward to put its Johnson winnings into stocks, the Wall 
street wolf grins pleasantly and murmurs: "Baa, baa, black sheep 
— you seem to have plenty of wool." 

A German biolo of the African 

he fair-haired Northern >m the 

gorilla. So maybe the whitest of us is a million n of the 

world's present heavy-weight champion. 

A Pennsylvania man declares that the death of the late 

Senator McEnery was a greater national loss than would 

toned by the passing of one third of the entire Senate. 
Now, whom could he possibly have in mind? 

Prof' aaterberg, of Harvard, has gone abroad to 

establish a sort of intellectual clearing house for educational 
matters between the I'nited States and Germany. Oh. fine! 
What Teddv doesn't know, Wilhelm can surely tell us. 



EEMT©RH AL 



C© 



INT 



Propaganda of the 
Divorce Congress. 



With some satisfaction the News 
Letter notes a forceful protest 
against the propaganda of the re- 
ligionists and reactionaries who 
dominated the recent Divorce Congress and under whose direc- 
tion and influence a uniform law on the subject has been pre- 
pared for submission to the States. The protestant is E. De 
Forest Leach, a prominent West Virginian, and his medium is 
the Green Bag, a publication of standing among American law- 
yers. In its May number this periodical gave space to the views 
of Walter George Smith, chairman of the Xational Commission 
on uniform divorce statutes, and now it permits Mr. Leach to 
reply to him. a privilege which the West Virginian uses with 
'rank fearlessness. 

In all essential points the opinions of Mr. Leach are at one 
with the views expressed from time to time in these columns. He 
would divorce religion ami divorce: would enlarge instead of 
contract the statutory cause's; would deal with divorce not as 
a social disease, but as a remedy, regarding ii as an agency for 
the promotion of moral* and not a manifestation of wickedness, 
a cause of shame and punishment. Incidentally bis pronounce- 
ment throws an interesting and useful light on the Divorce Con- 
gress, its methods and composition, and on the real purpose of 
those who framed the proposed uniform law. The gathering at 
Washington was sufficiently distinguished, but. as Mr. Leach ob- 
served, it was notable for the absence of persons ipialilied In 
speak with authority upon the scientific problems involved in 
the considerations of the Congress'. Only one physician was in 
attendance, a woman. She left in disgust Over the altitude of 

the "ecclesiastically inclined" delegates toward any discussion 
of "conditions well known to her profession." Indeed, the pur- 
pose of a majority of the Congress seemed to be to advertise their 
own orthodoxy. 

In the opinion of this Congress and of the trainers of the uni- 
form law. says Mr. Leach., "the only good divorce law is one 
which absolutely prohibits divorce." Thai this is the real pur- 
posi of the religio-reactionaries in seeking to gel on the statute 

books a uniform law, is made plain by their announcement that 
they hope the States which bave narrower ami stricter laws than 
the one prepared as the resuli of the Congress will not relax 
their restrictions by enactment of the uniform statute. There is 

peril for the social structure id' the Republic in their vement 

It such a law. so fathered, should be adopted by the States, noth- 
ing short of a revolution would prevail to modify it. Hence the 
earnest protest of the West Virginian. 

And he is as bold as well ms broad, this protestant. Listen: 

"While it is true that the church iia- attempted to assume con- 
trol of the matter and settle all problems incident In marriage 

ami divorce, vet it is also true thai these problems have stub- 
bornly refused to he thus settled. * * * People arc just begin- 
ning to learn that divorces, in some form or other, have been en- 
existent with marriage: that they existed long before Christian- 
ity or Christian dogma, and that they will probably continue to 
he an element in the social organisation a long time after Chris- 
tianity has ceased to dogmatize." 

To quote Mr. Leach is almost to reiterate what the News Let- 
ter has lately said on the same subject, as for example, in such 
an utterance as this: 

"A marriage is, and always has been, sacred just to tin 1 extent 
that the man and woman who jointly assume the obligation make 
it so. and there is tin power yet known which can alter this. 
Neither is there any power which can give saeredness to a mar- 
riage independent of the parties thereto. When it does not ex- 
i-t, both public and private morality demand that the marriage 



Si CCESS or THE 

Contention League. 



contract — for, under the conditions, that is about all there is 
left of it — be dissolved." 

The truth is, that no community was ever made any more 
moral by tightening the divorce laws, but rather otherwise, as 
this observer points out in the ease of New York, where the 
necessity of proving adultery in order to dissolve a marriage has 
resulted in the recording of five times as many cases of estab- 
lished infidelity as across the line in Pennsylvania. Nor is denial 
of the right to re-marry productive of aught but a most sinister 
condition, the natural consequence of creating a class, as Mr. 
Leach remarks, "capable of doing anything except to lawfully 
marry." 

The News Letter welcomes candid and courageous discussion 
of this subject than which there is no other so important to the 
nil inn and the world. Tradition, religious 'dogma, a false and 
ignorant sentimentalism and stupid disregard of the laws of sex 
— these arc the influences and conditions that must be set aside 
and wiped out before humanity can deal in justice and fairness 
with its chief problem. Common sense and not religion is what 
the divorce question needs, and common sense is the keynote of 
the West Virginian's forthright assailing of the Divorce Con- 
gress and its uniform law. 

SB- 
Little noise and big results appear 
to he the working programme of the 
Convention League of San Fran- 
cisco. Most of the other civic bodies 
discuss things for the good of the city: this body does things. 
It is the youngster among the organizations that are now at work 

Eor tl arly realization of the city's _yisions of greatness, but 

they may one and all take lessons from it. 
, Already the labors of the Convention League, plus the un- 
deniable and manifold attractions of the Pacific Coast metropo- 
lis, have brought the cheering assurance that next year we shall 
have two great conventions here, one national and the other in- 
Lhternational, anil another smaller gathering that will draw le ns 
not less than 75,000 visitors of the most desirable kind. There 
is a possibility that still another of the great assemblage- 
scheduled for 1911 will be held in San Francisco, in which case 
the n.tal of strangers thus to be entertained will be increased to 
not less than 125,000. 

3T 
Possibly tin- most desirable convention of the country is that 
of the Xational Educational Association, which is to meet here 
in July, thanks to the efforts of the League. It will bring us 
approximately 35,000 visitors, each one of whom can be. ami 
probably will, lie a strong moving force and factor in spreading 
throughout the country about the city ami the State such reports 
as will inevitably turn interest and attention ami population this 
way. To entertain the teachers of the country is. for a place 
like this, a rich opportunity. What the teacher tells her pupils 
these pupils tell their parents. It is the next best tiling to hav- 
ing those parents come and see for themselves. As the natural 
and logical consequence of such reports, many of those parents 
will come, and many who come will stay. 

3B- 
The other large gathering will be the convention of the Inter- 
national Sunday School Association, which will be attended by 
practically all those who go to Los Angeles for the meetings 
of the Bishops and the Bible Society. In all, it is estimated that 
the Sunday School Convention will mean the coming to San 
Francisco of more than 30,000 persons. Earlier in the year we 
shall have the national assemblage of the American Association 
of Architects, for which an attendance of some 2,000 people is 
forecasted. Tf we can induce the Eagles to wing their way so 
far. there will be another 50,00(1 to whom we can prove thai 
California is the land of opportunity and inducement, the place 



.Ii i.\ 16, 1!M0. 



and California Advertiser 



to work and play and 

All th i itors li tinctly worth while to entertain in tin 
hion we can command. TI1C3 are the well-to-do class. 

Mosl of them will bring money to spend in seeing the » 

and t1»i- resources of the State whose name is Bynonymous tin 
world over tor plenty ami prosperity. Mosl of them will be 
potential settlers and investors, directly or indirectly. Virtually 
everj one of there ran be made an advertising agent of ami a 
promoter for California. That will depend upon how liberally 
ami enthusiastically our people respond with their money and 
their interesi to the various rails for help to give the strangers 
a good time. The Convention League brings us these guests. 
It is our part to receive and entertain them. 

No other city in Hie country has a better name for taking care 
id' visitors, hut it is a reputation earned by haphazard effort. 
There is need of better team work, of organized and systematized 
eo-operation all through the community, to the end thai our 
guests may carry away distinctly pleasant recollections of us ami 
our town. We have the equipment, and it is all new and up-to- 
date. No other city can outdo us in housing and feeding a mul- 
titude of strangers. There is need, however, of funds and of 
interest and participation for the task of making the conven- 
tioners feel themselves welcome, to amuse them and In please 
them. Let's all buckle down to the business of finishing in good 
stvlc what the Convention League has so well begun. 

Champ Clark, Democratic leader of 
The Tariff Tssm-:. the House, announces Eor his parly, 

and Senators Cummins, Dolliver, 
La Follette. Burton and many other leaders in the Republican 
party, announce that there will be but one leading issue before 
the country in the coming Congressional campaign, ami that is- 
sue "ill be tariff revision, only that tne Democracy will advo- 
cate a radical change in the Payne-Aldrich schedule, while flic 
friends of a downward revision will advocate whatever changes 
that may lie required to protect the people against industrial 
monopolies, at the same lime high enough to protect American 
labor against the pauper wage schedules of Europe. Bui it did 
not need a pronnneiamenlo from Champ Clark or from certain 
Senators to outline the issue. 

When Congress revised the Dingley tariff duties by making 
them higher instead of lowering them, as Congress was instructed 
to do by the people, the country, espei ially the West, the Middle- 
West ami the Northwest, quickly decided thai at the aexi gen- 
era] Congressional election they would see to ii thai delegates 
were returned to Congress who would obej orders, If there was 
'in declaration of President Roosevell more than another that 
endeared him to the common people, it was bis pronouncement, 
(dear and comprehensive, thai the country had outgrown the 
need of high protective customs duties, and should be relieved 
of the heavy burden. It was Roosevelfs insistence thai such a 

promise was made a pmminent feature el" the platform upon 
which Mr. Taft stood ami appealed to the people, and it wa- the 
promise of downward taritf revision thai induced so many Demo- 
crats and Vnpulists to mpporl Mi. Taft's candidacy. 

Perhaps it is better thai the ountry should have an opportu- 

nil\ to express its wishes "it the taritf question in an off year so 

that whatever the purpose of the el. he new Con- 

gress would have time to formulate a program, even before the 
opening of the se<si,. n . In any event, the decision of the people 
at the November election is bound to exert considerable influence 
in shaping the battle line in 1918. Certain it is. the tariff ques- 
tion never before engaged the attention and serious thoi [ 

iple ba\ 

schedules as in some degree responsible for industrial trus'ts. 
commodity monopolies ind 10 enemy of bus 



Amkricans Abroad. 



A famous Englisl in nine ...ml 

that, the American was the besl of 
originators and the worsl of imita- 
tors. This statement is particularly true in its application i" 

ili'- American at home ami abroad. In his own country, ami ae 
1 type, his hospitality, his largeness of mind, In- directness o£ 

effort ami intense energy claim for him the admiration of all 

who behold him. Hut, removed to a Eoreign country, In- is too 
often apl to subvert his own vivid personality and ideals to a 
senseless apeing of characteristics, conventions, and things that 
are not of hint, and for which he has no need, or. on the other 
hand, make himself ridiculous by rebelling against and criticis- 
ing that which he does ttot understand, hut. which belongs to a 
people as the misllohic lo the oak. Luckily this sort of thing ap- 
plies principally to our itinerant middle class, and more especi- 
ally In women of thai class, who arc usually possessed of social 
ambitions and a yearning for an education, or enlightenment, as 
you will, a la aristocratic. The real American gentlewoman and 
I he real American gentleman are always capable of conducting 
themselves with perfect adaptability and grace in whatever 
society or location they find themselves. So many of our less 
cultured class, however, have become world travelers, through an 
over-abundance of gold, that, in the average foreign conception of 
us has been instilled generally a feeling of satire which it remains 
with the individual visitor abroad to eradicate or endorse accord- 
ing to himself. Since what is thought of us is not nearly so 
important as what we really are, we might perhaps point out with 
pardonable pride at our prosperity that the true significance of 
the matter was that so many of our less cultured class could af- 
ford to travel. But a good impression created is a good impres- 
sion, standing for the pleasant amenities of life and smoothing 
the way to things of much greater importance, and for reasons of 
personal and patriotic pride were well worth while. Besides, it 
means simply that the traveling American should he just himself 
or herself, neither endeavoring to out-Rome Rome nor make 
loud and uncalled-for bids on its ancient statuary for his back 
kitchen. To institutions and customs as old as those of Europe 
«e owe at least respect, if not. reverence. With regard to those 
moneyed, self-exiled Americans of our genteel class who live 
abroad, purchasing antique castles at fabulous sums and making 
foreign society and the entertainment of its kings and princes 

their chief ambition of life, it can only be said that it is money 
and effort poorly expended. Because the bile King Edward fav- 
ored Americans and took them up, one billion dollars of Ameri- 
can money was invested in English property, particularly in 

I. Ion. This money, made through the American working 

ami lifted completely out of bis reach, the advantages and profits 
of its expenditure being donated entirely to another, country, 
might better have boon Spent at home. Besides, with the pres- 
ent; king and cpteen averse to the intimate acceptance of Ameri- 
cans in English society, the investment is practically nil. Can- 
not the true American understand that his birthright of being 
born in this country is as groat as any, and that it should not be 
of bis soul to slaver to foreign kings and princes. In this in- 
1 as before, however, the fault lies particularly with our 
women, who lead the procession, lured by their inai 
ambitions and jealousy of each other, ft is the same in 
that causes her to spend fabulous sums for spurious paintings, 
making a jest of herself before the world, and to enrich with 
business the laughing extortionists who manipulate in "genuine 
old" French furniture manufactured (he day before yesterday. 

Milwaukee, following the example of Chicago, is stopping 

le of any kir.d of intoxicants in the "red-light" district. 
• sumptuary legislation to prohibit the mixing of pleas- 
ures ? 



San Francisco News Letter 



/July lli, 1910. 



Long ago the prosperous American 
'I'm; Farmer a farmer took up the automobile, not 

Good Roads Convert, so much as a means of living as by 

way of a luxury. It served a good 
purpose, however, in his hands, for it made him instantly a 
convert to the good roads gospel: and notoriously the farmer, 
who is the first direct beneficiary of that movement, is the last to 
take any active interest in it. Rapidly, as the price of durable 
and serviceable motor vehicles has fallen, the automobile has 
entered more and more into the rural life of the country, and 
has become an agency of the highest importance in the improve- 
ment of country roads and the extension of the areas of profit- 
able intensive cultivation. In this wise, and further, in the at- 
traction it has lent to country living, the automobile is playing a 
large if unappreciated part in solving the complex problem 
labeled the high cost of living. 

Some recent speculation upon the increased cost of living has 
been pessimistically aimed' at the automobile. The people, it 
has been said, are burning up their earnings in gasoline — arc 
wasting their substance upon machines that enable them merely 
to go somewhere and back in a great hurry. An article recently 
prepared for the National Orange, the greatest of all the agri- 
cultural organizations, easily and completely rj lisl es ibis fool 

theory. It goes close to the heart of the current ec mic prob- 
lem when it declares that the troubli Lies not so much in the fad 
that food production lias grown more costlj as in the fact that, 
through what James J. Hill calls "an enlarged city life and a 

neglected country life." thi 10 fcion is becoming n - 

mote from the sources of food supply. It needs no argument lo 
show that the cure for that eoudition is to bring these two ele- 
ments closer together, and is thus chiefly a matter of trans - 

tation. By graphic charts, built from Federal -tali-lies, it is 
made plain that with mud roads and horse-drawn wagons, the 
average profitable haul to a depot is three miles, giving an avail- 
able area of 28.?*; square miles — that is. profitable for truck 
farming: with improved roads the radius, determined by the 
average haul, is six miles, and the area 11? square miles; with 
improved roads and mechanical ti the average haul is ten 

miles and the available area :il I. in square miles. 

The truth, is. here i- plenty of ground left for the production 
of the food stuffs the country nu but it is too far from 

the railways or the rivers under (he existing general conditions 
of roads and These conditions the automobile is re- 

lieving. Th. Earmere are speedilj overcoming their early and 
natural prejudice against th" motor ear — overcoming it to BR 
an extent that, according to dependable figures, they now own 
76,000 of tie hi - they so lately despised. And wherever a 
farmer owns an automobile, the good roads idea is well estab- 
lished. Not only that: the farmer with the automobile increases 
measurably and appreciably the available area for profitable 
cultivation, opens up that more land, does just that much more 
toward feeding an ever-hungry world, does just that much to- 
ward reducing the cost of living — is, in fad, by virtue of his 
automobile a benefactor of his kind. 



The defeat of Governor Huches' 
Fob a Campaign primary election hill by a eombina- 
oe Education. tion of the Republican and Demo- 
machines in the New York 
ature, has aroused the indignation of Civic Leaguers and 
similar organizations all over the East, and tiny propose to start 
a 'ipaign of education to be carried into every State where no 
such law exists, or where existing laws are faulty. It is ad- 
mitted that Hi- Hughes measure was an ideal safi ard against 

bossism, but it was rejected by the ringsters because it gave no 
opportunity for packing conventions, thus leaving the voters of 



the great State of New York where they have always been, with 
little or no voice in selecting candidates. The rejected bill was 
prepared under the personal supervision of Governor Hughes, 
and it met all the requirements of public sentiment, but had it 
become an operative law it would not have been possible to pack 
nominating conventions with the strikers of the machine, con- 
sequently by a eomhinalion between the machine men of both 
parties who happened to be members of the Legislature the bill 
was rejected by a disgustingly small majority. 

But undoubtedly the proposed action of the various civic or- 
ganizations will conduce to a clearer and healthier political at- 
mosphere in New York, and it is easy to say that no more 
machine-made nominating conventions will be held in that State 
after this year. Nevertheless, not always is the direct primary a 
success in every community, but when it fails to secure good 
results, the people rather than the law are to blame. A primary 
n Jaw largely increases the responsibility of citizenship, or 
rather that is what it is intended to do, but unfortunately some 
citizens are already clothed with more responsibility than they 
are worthy of. A rightly worded primary election privilege is 
the nearest possible approach to the consummation of practical 
Democracy — that is, to giving the citizen a direct voice in the 
selection of men to conduct the public affairs of the community. 
It is the only direct approach to conducting the affairs of the 
State by the people. But while this is true, the primary popular 
election privileges pre-supposes that the citizen is worthy of it, 
and that he will exercise the right in good faith, with honesty 
of purpose and with an eye single to the betterment of the con- 

1 n- of existence of the community as a whole and to every 

individual member of it. It is to impress voters with the im- 
portance of and personal responsibility which the direct primary- 
creates that civic organizations intend to conduct a campaign 
of education, for it is true without a doubt that no great benefits 
would accrue to the public unless the people participate con- 
scientiously and with thorough honesty of purpose in the pri- 
mary, to the end that only men of integrity may be chosen for 
public trusts. 



Lord Kitchener, at one of the dinners tendered him in 

New York, apologized for his want of eloquence. "I can't - 
that is why I don't," he said. "I think it is better to keep silent 
than to put you to sleep. The officers of the British army are 
noted for their inability to make a public speech. Whenever an 
officer is foolish enough to rise to answer a toast, the guests say 
to one another significantly as he sits down: 'Well, you know, the 
bigger the gun the bigger the bore.' " — Ex. 



A TREAT FOR TOURISTS. 
If vou wiint to taste California's choicest table wine, call Eo 
the Italian-Swiss Colony's choice Tiro. All hotels serve it. 








CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 



314 SACRAMENTO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



.lii.v 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




An Eastern journal mentions the case of a handsome fe- 
male drummer who had been prevailed upon to make application 
for membership in the local traveling mens' association, and 
who was blackballed because it was said that she made use of 
her pleasing personality when introducing her goods. Despite 
inferiority in some of the things that distinguish enlightened 
from barbarous people, the traveling men of the Pacific Coast- 
blush for their Eastern brethren, and stand in readiness to re- 
ceive with open arms this rejected sister. Beauty and a pleas- 
ing personality are prime requisites for admission to the Trav- 
eling Men's Association of San Francisco, and applications from 
those at all deficient in these qualities are sternly, though sor- 
rowfully, rejected. 

We are advised that unless Adam and Eve come to some 

early understanding and make common cause against the devil, 
there will be the devil to pay. For Satan's one sin, that of tum- 
bling himself headlong from heaven, his atonement has been 
great, and, if left to the heartless decision of humanity, the 
stream of contumely for ages sent toward him will never cease 
to flow. We require a scape-goat, and Old Nick, through time 
;iinl custom, has made himself indispensable. Eve's whine, "the 
devil tempted me," taken up by Adam, echoes from the corridors 
id' the past, and will go sniveling along down through'all eter- 
nity. We are a cowardly lot, my brethren, and mean. When the 
devil has his due he will have the .majority of us by the ears. 

On July 9 th, a woman of Los Angeles, 60 years old and 

not very good-looking, was sentenced to live years in San Quen- 
tin for forgery. On the same day, another woman, young, debon- 
nair and pretty, guilty of a like crime, walked onl of a San 

Francisco court room— free. 'The old woman went to jail. Hie 
young one into Hie sunshine. To one of theie offenders exact 

justice was dealt. I have an opinion as to the one to whom w i- 

accorded this rare distinction, but withhold u as valnelea 

unquestionably, a threadbare coal upon the hack of a genl 

who spends bis lite m search of the philosopher's stone is strong 
presumptive evidence that his ri tave not been crowned 

with any remarkable degi 

Good work was done at the World's Fair luncheon at the 

Palace the other day. It is noticeable thai whenevei 

ous campaign is to be inaugurated, and m Eor the 

discussion of ways and menu-, the gathering usually take- on 

i Ik form of a Luncheon or dinner, unless the cam 

poor men, in which ease any old way. however mean, answers the 

purpose. Happy is the man who lives to eat, pi 

it to eat. although they do say that many of our rich men arc 

eating themselves up. Elating i- the rich man's fol 

ing is ill ■ pooe man's > nine. 

The conflict long w.i en Promoter R 

Governor Gillett has. apparently, terminated. It was an exhilar- 
ating spectacle while it lasted, and the fusillade ol 
Eickard, punctured at lorn: intervals - 

guns, -dill echoes through Space. What the effect on 
ing has been is ] out that the fa 

smashed olT the fight pictures is apparent to the inoal 
observer. 



If 1 bad not arrived at thai mental condition when sur- 

[M'iscs are no longei possible, I should he , little startled 
announcement that a young American lady, one tune of New 
York hut now ot Paris, has espoused the cause of the Bourbon 

on! will address Mr. and Mrs. Orleans as "Your Majesty." This 

young lady's previous claims to unusual distinction have been 
confined to the circumstances thai bei pa has money and an an- 
nounced intention to endow the French nobility with some id' this 
wealth and all of her person. The further announcement that 

-he will not only become a royal subject but a lady in waiting to 
Mrs. Orleans will, i think, make the suppression of conscious 
pride, over the possible achievements of wealthy lady Americans, 
extremely difficult to those possessed of aristocratic tendencies 
coupled to delicate and emotional natures. 

It is not pleasant to be told that there exists, both in 

England and America, a people who make a practice of scuttling 
and wrecking ships. Scoundrels, we are told, prowl about the 
docks of large shipping centers, ever on the lookout for some 
crazy old craft, which they may vamp up, load to the scuppers 
and ships to some distant port. There would he fewer disasters 
at sea if it were made criminal not only to take out a policy but 
to grant insurance noon an unworthy vessel. 

The discerning editor of a morning contemporary asset-Is 

that "too much silence bespeaks idiocy, and constant prating pro- 
claims the fool." While the experience aud attainments of my 
brother entitle him to be regarded as an authority on this par- 
ticular subject that none will feel inclined to dispute, might it 
not prove vastly more interesting to have him describe his sen- 
sations under both conditions and leave us to decide for ourselves 
wdierein the distinction should he placed? 

Although it may appear so to some, the tail is not what 

pushes the dog along, and never was there a canine, nor combi- 
nation of canines, so foolish as to depend upon the intelligence 
and exertion of their caudal appendages for the accomplishment 
of any such purpose. This being true, it is difficult to compre- 
hend the logic which convinces some officials that, because their 
tongues and beads Lnordinati ly wag, their tails should he capable 
of doing (he thinking. 

Withoui the slightest intention lii joke, lint with the m- 

-i seriousness, a writer on labor conditions says that "labor is 

loyal to it mployer only so faj as their interests are linked to- 
gether." Thus, by one rancorous - Ige ol the p loes this 

scribbling malignan rip out the golden thread- ot poesj thai 
have formed the web so long ho lital in heart to 




Freely Flowing, Simply Snowing, 
Without a Fault, LESLIE SALT. 

IN HERMETICALLY SEALED PACKAGES 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jul? 16, 1910. 




Ruth Littleton, pretty, kittenish, and twenty years of age, 
employed at a departmental store in this city, was tempted Last 
week to raise a check of one dollar to fifty, in order, as she 
stated, to indulge her love Eor candies, theatres' and pretty things. 
Ruth Littleton, as ii happens, is just an average girl, with an 
average girl's tastes, and working For too low a wage. Her love 
for theatres and pretty things is no more inordinate possibly 
than that of other girls of her age, hut her daring or thought- 
lessness was greater. Any one of her companions in a moment 
of impulsiveness might have been tempted to do the same as she 

did. Youth must always lie served, if not in one way. then in 

another. And because Kuth Littleton is just a girl and works 
for too low a wage, she might now — if it had not been for the 
eonsiderateness of the court and her employers — have heen on 
her way to San Quentin. Such a thing is hard to think about, 
but it points to an evil and social problem to which other women 
might well turn their attention — women of influence who have il 
in their power by acting together to greatly better the present 
conditions and environment that hamper and destroy such a 
girl. Women of this active, courageous sort have done a lot for 
the waitress. They have given her a union and compelled rea- 
sonable working hours. Let them do the same for the depart- 
mental store girl. All that is needed is a few such leaders with 
a right inspiration and the proper sort of guidance. The pres- 
ent low scale of wages for young women in departmental stores, 
we fancy, isn't so much by reason of the selfishness of the em- 
ployer as that the girls have aever sought relief or collectively 
asserted themselves. With the matter put before the employers 
in the right way. they would in all probability lie willing to do 
what is fair. Rather less unionism among the men and a little 
more among the working fair sex, as a protection and safeguard 
to those who must do their natural share in mothering posterity 
would set matters pretty nearly right. 

5 5 5 

From a newspaper despatch, we learn 

with unlimited amazement that a Reno 

judge in a certain divorce case the other 

day went so far as to reserve his decision. 

If the intelligence had not CO through 

the Associated Press we would have set 
it down as the veriest Blander on Nevada. 
But it was neither a "Bulletin BCOOp" nor 
a Hearst "special wire." The Reno judge 
actually reserved his decision. Whal is 
the world, and particularly Reno, coming 
to? Hesitating in such a fashion, did 
this judge realize that he was striking al 
the reputation and popularity of bis 
town? With every special and limited 
dumping husincss and divorce-hunters in- 
to Reno, what right had he In hesitate? 
Would ancient Rome have stood Eor such 

a citizen? Such unusual treatment is 

enough to send the divorce colony of Reno 
out on strike with a demand for shorter 
hours — in court. Docs the sagebrush city 



imagine because it held "the fiasco of the century" that it can 
live forever on that notoriety, and forego its regular bill-of-fare 
and occupation of severing the goose from the gander? Has 
tin Jeffries' blue funk infected the town, that a Reno judge 
should pause like this in the course of his duty? Out on sueh a 
citizen! Reno should see to it that nothing of this kind happens 
again. 

s s s 

A well-known marrying w an of New York, sworn to the 

trade al fourteen, who ha- hail as husbands a railroad official, 
a cleric, a restauram proprietor, a capitalist, an hotel-kee|ier ami 
divers others, has given advice to her sex In a newspaper article 
on "How to Woo a Man." Well qualified from her many ex- 
periences lo kienv Hi,, art, the holy speaks with authority, and 
i he dope -lie dispenses goes conclusively to prove that the man 
who imagines he has courted ami captured a woman i- the rarest 
kind of an idiot, ami thai invariably he has bei n courted anil cap- 
, Cured himself instead. In other words, they make fools of us all. 
ami "the wisest fool is the fool who knows she is folding him all 
the lime." The Looker (in regrets to gtate that he has m.i al- 
ways been a wise fool. Neither was the circulation manager wh i 
WOOed the buttermilk girl in one of our issues several weeks ago, 

ami i- now pining away lor tier, dying gradually as he rears a 

mustache; neither ate any of you that are men. so do not point 
a linger at him. A man's heart agonies are not lo lie laughed al. 
ami in this ease m. one who did inn meet the buttermilk girl 
could be sure of his laughter. Think of what she might have 

done to you, most worthy, grinning sir. But, lo sidestep a deli- 
cate subject and return to the much-married lady ami her 

advice, -he says thai at eighteen a girl should he confiding, de- 
pendent and helpless; at twenty-one show that she knew the 
world, and assert hers,. If: at twenty-three lead the man gentl} 
on to do the wooing; at twenty-four make the course of line love 
as smooth as possible; at twenty-seven meet him more than hall 
wav ; and at thirty — well, be bold, but not too bold. This is sim- 
ply great; hut let the man reading it consider the part he lives 

against the one the woman plays. The girl of sweet eighteen i,,> 

loves lor heing coniiding, dependent, ami helpless when she is 
none of those tilings. No mailer what or how iiiueh Bhe as-erl- 
at twenty-one, she never asserts the truth about herself or he 
would find her out. Truly she must know the world — of wo- 
men — at that age. At twenty-three she i- supposed to have ac- 
quired the hardihood to lead the man on to the worst that can 
happen to him. and at twenty-seven meet him more than half 
way with the puppy chain behind her back. Then at thirty, 
since none of these previous or, ,,--,. are hold, she is instructed 



A WELL KNOWN EMBROIDERY AUTHORITY WRITES: 



'1 HAD WASHED WITH 



PEARLINE 

several handsome pieces ot em- 
broidery that were embroidered 
with Richardson's Wash Silks 
which had been on the road with 
teachers. DISPLAYED in shop 
windows. HANDLED by hund- 
reds of people.and the result was in 
every respectSATISFACTORY. 
I shall instruct all my teachers 
to use PEARLINE in cleansing 
their samples of embroidery." 



Pearline 



perfectly 



July 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



u 



in be so. 01 what could this boldness possibly consist? Per- 
haps Ned Greenway will be able to illustrate when be comes 
back with bis dances and dancers from Paris— for aurelj if h 
lakes along the dances, he will not leave all of the dancers be- 
hind, unless it be in New York. At thirty, we would judge, 
that a woman should have acquired enough aense to know thai 
a man simply wants a woman to love him. uol an actress, ami 
that he will love her if ii be in the hear! of him, and that if 
he cannot do so he never will. 

S « S 

With much regret and sympathy for the ambitious pluto- 
cratic element of this country, wc learn that forty-four fake 
titles have gone by the board in France, barred by the Commis- 
sion in Lunacy, or some such other body. Think of robbing the 
daughters of .New York and Chicago multi-millionaires of their 
counts and semi-princes in this discourteous fashion ; and think, 
moreover, of separating the aspiring French bourgeoise, who de- 
scended to the titles, from their dreams of moneyed and married 
mistresses. When a girl marries purely for a title or money, -we 
take it, of course, that she is nothing more than a mistress. And 
since some mistresses really love, and should therefore be re- 
garded with some respect, she is often not as much. Free love 
is better than boughten virtue any day in the week — and not ex- 
cluding Sunday. But, let it be stated again, forty-four fake 
titles have gone by the board in France. What, in consequence, 
are forty-four ambitious daughters of this republic going to do? 

If European nobility, like Dresden chinaware, is to fall to the 
floor in this insecure fashion, what will eventually become of 
us? How is a proud American girl, but one generation removed 
from a pickled-pork king or an honest, industrious laborer, who 
began life with a wheelbarrow, to wipe out the stain of her an- 
cestry? With the ancient, doubtful and dirty rag of foreign 
aristocracy barred, it might be well if she wore to reach for the 
white silk of American manhood; stuff thai possesses the virility 
and initiation to cleave a fortune oui of pickled pork or other- 
wise, and for the love of a good woman achieve a state to which 
it was not born. 

» 8 S 

Xow that they are utilizing electricity to grow crops, whj ma 
extend (he idea to rearing a harvest on bald beads In the sane 
means. As time goes on. these glow-worm cm; - are be- 
coming more and more frequent, ami more and more of a nui- 
sance — though they are still admitted to our churches ami thea- 
tres. "Let vour lighi so shjne," sayeth the twenty-third i - 

mamlment. 1ml lights like these deserve the blink if they had 
lo lie painted, The Lookei Ox speaks with exasperation, for at a 
performance at the Orpheum tin- week, where he went to feast 
on Lily Lena, that most charming of all vaudevillaina, he could 
scarcely sec the little lady for the reflecti >t bald heads in 

the first few rows. Worst of all. there was another bald head in 
the upper box t" which she sang. And during it all. the bald 
head- below Boated, glanced and glinted, nodded, blushed and 
shone till they looked lor all the world like a group ol blistered 

sun-Mowers swaying in a breese andet a stitr sun. For on 

his were outdone, and tin little lady must have 
the calcium man was overkind with his shine. At am i 
retired perspiring. Whereupon all the glistening, mellow knobs 
re-id up in applause, subduing immediately to a shriveled, 
pumpkin-like and ancient-peeled silence "f regret. There is no 
use arguing — the bald-head never has his day. Even in a I 
does he carrv his sun with him. And never can he understand 
that there are certain reflections that no man should . 

The "big tight" is over. Whipped, overshadowed. 01 - 
death, as vou choose, the white man has been sent back to 
falfa. where there are already mtltteiings of another ". ■ 



back." We beg ol him to stay where he is. Our ministry and 
■ - have had quite enough and publicity for the 

time being, and sporting writers have - titterli exhau ted their 
imagination thai thej would be obliged to Buck thumbs Eqi an- 
other single metaphor. Imagine originating such phrases as 

"the California grizzly," "the lauanan." "the oliou v-hiiod mar- 
vel," etc. No; let the "war corresp lent" lake a much-needed 

breathing spell. He has lied in not, now let him lie in peace. 
And*mav even the moving pictures not disturb his dreams, lie 
has earned oblivion and over half a million dollars for a pair of 
pugs, robbing the dear, old. good-natured public to the same 
tune. Can more be expected of him? Wc think not — even if 
the insatiable lust for gold of the two fighters re-assert itself in 
another threatened outburst. The "war correspondent" has one 
virtue, at least, that should save him from being lynched; he 
rarely draws more than forty or fifty dollars a week. 

i v -5 

At the time of the car strike in this city, a big Irishman, noted 
among his fellows for extreme volubility, lost his job on the Cali- 
fornia street line, and, having seven small children to support, 
wasted no time in seeking further employment. Calling at the 
office of Taylor Brothers, sons of ex-Mayor Taylor, he was ap- 
pointed night watchman, and cautioned to arm himself the better 
to protect the place because of the presence of a rough element 
consequent upon the strike. 

"Sure, Mr. Taylor," vociferated Pat, with convincing earnest- 
ness, "don't yez be worrying about that. It's not the poor work- 
ing man yez need be afeared of, hut the slick gintlemin that weir 
the biled shirts and little black ties, like yerself, that will be 
nading the gun after thim." 



CANDY SENT TO THE COUNTRY. 

A box of candy 1= always welcomed by friends in the country. Easily 
sent by mail or express from any one of Geo. llaas & .Sons' four candy 
stores: Phelan Building: Fillmore at lCllis; Van Ness at Sutter; ami 38 
Market street, near Ferry. 



EVERY MAN 



NEEDS REST, RECREATION AND RELIEF FROM THE 
WORRY AND CARE OF BUSINESS IN THE GOOD 
OLD SUMMER TIME, WHEN A JUDICIOUS USE OF 



HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



IN THE FRAGRANT JULEP 
OR THE COOL, SPARKLING 
HIGH-BALL 
WILL REFRESH, STRENGTHEN AND RESTORE 



Sold at all Rrnt-claf nd bv jobbers. 

WM. i.anaiivn v sun. Baltimore, .Mil. 




€lttnlbw®im®ia m M®M Owh 



By Harriett Watson Capwell. 



There has been some discussion oi late over the foundation of 
night clubs for women. As I understand it, the idea was born 
of a desire to provide the restless or neglected wife with an op- 
portunity to enjoy the luxuries and mental friction of a down- 
town club, where a good dinner is Berved, card rooms and billiard 
tables provided, an excellent library at hand — in short a club 
that is cut carefully and straight after the pattern of a man's 
club instead of running off on the bias, and missing the things 
which make a man's club so attractive. Several clubwomen have 
come forward to endorse the idea. They are neither neglected 
nor unhappy, but they must be victims of that spirit of restlee - 
ness which animates the super-modern woman. They argue that 
since the most devoted husband likes a night off at the club, the 
same form of relaxation musl be g I for the wife. 

Doubtless a coruscating Niagara of discussioD will come roar- 
ing down from the pulpits, overflow into the news 
Hood conversatioi wherever clubwomen foregather. Then it will 
dry up and leave less trace than the lost lakes of the desert. For 
though I am neither a prophet nor the seventh son of a 
son, I predict that this thing is not to be. San Francisco is not 
ready for such an innovation. 

© © © 

According to a published interview. Mrs. Lehman Blum, a 
prominent clubwoman, advocated the innovation thn-: "Women 
do not altogether have a squ i re de a I in this world. We are [usl 
as capable of enjoying the good things of life as men, an.l bi re 
we are always relegated to the background. If I had my way. 
every city would have its club For women of the middle .-lasso. 
a place where they could go evenings to enjoy a little quiet read- 
ing, a game of cards or a couple of hours' chat. If a mum Li- 
the freedom of a club at night, bo should a woman." 

Note the phrase "middle class." Mrs. Blum evidently 
that the strata above is provided with sufficii nl relaxation and in- 
rhereae the middle class woman must face drab and 
dreary nights of mental and social inertia. Let ns grant that 
such is the case, and prop up the argument in favor of these 
clubs with a list of prosperous examples in New York and Lon- 
don. London has dozens of clubs patterned after a man'.- idea 
of a club. The middle class and the aristocracy, the intellec- 
tuals and the mental averages, the professional and the con 
place wage-earners all have clubs with the creature comfor - 
that materialize at the pushing of a button. Xew York is n it 
-•i strong numerically in the man-idea club as London, but it 
nts a neat and serviceable list. 

But study the rosters of these clubs, and you will find thai even 
those that are ultra-exclusive have at least two hundred members, 

and the dues and initiation fees are large in proporti u 

scant membership. The most exclusive club in Xew York iin- 
poe - .n initiation fee of $2,000, and the dues are large in ac- 
cordance. Yet in order to maintain their club-building in an 
adequate state of upholstered ease, there is usually an assess- 
ment at the end of every year. It takes chunks of gold to com- 
mand satin-shod service. There are other clubs that are a few 
- below in point of elegance, and yet meet the require- 
ments of absolute comfort and good service. To obtain these 

things at a reasonable cost, hundreds of .» D co-operate, 

many of the women's clubs showing a membership of a thousand 
or more. 

Which brings us to the obstruction in the way of founding in 
San Francisco such a club as proposed by Mrs. Blum. The oth 
-miction is dollars and cents. I will wager that there are not 
enough ''middle class" women here who could, or would. 
cially support a man-idea club. The average woman has never 
glimpsed the expense - of a man's club. I know a 

oung wife who positively nagged her husband to join the 

Bohemian Club. He had plenty of friends, and he pas- 
election committee without question. Then a In - deal 

fell through, the prof - on which he had meant to apply to his 
initiation fee. The subject of fee- had never been discussed at 
home, but he had taken it for granted thai hi- wife knew that 
it amounted to several hundred dollars. She went limp with 
surprise at the sum, and in order that he might join, the] bor- 
rowed the money at per cent, and even 'lie monthly club dues 
entail closer economy at home. This ambitious young matron 
gets some pleasure out of Baying: "Jack went to' the "eh: 
night — Bohemian, yon know"— hut Jack himself, not being a 



dutiable man by nature, gets a small return in pleasure for the 
amount invested and the interest thereon. 
© © © 

The promoters of the woman's man-idea club will doubtless in- 
sist that my argument is sordid, that i am accenting the finan- 
cial obstruction unduly. They will show ways and means of 
running such a club at a cost that would not make a dent in the 
income of a modest bond-holder. But those ways and means are 
not compatible with the man-idea club, nor do they dovetail with 
the man-idea woman's clubs in New York and London. A club 
where one may come and go, day or night, push a button and be 
supplied with any vintage, enjoy good meals, billiards, cards or 
hooks, mix with club-fellows or enjoy a solitary grouch in leath- 
ered comfort, these arc the fundamentals of the man-idea club, 
and to inaugurate such a club means that the wealthiest promot- 
ers buy large blocks of building stock, and' every member pays 
;< pretty initiation fee and dues. The family Club sprang full- 
grown, hut not from lie- head of Minerva — from the pockets of 
the wealthier insurgents from the Bohemian Club. 

San Francisco is a big city, but it is not yet big enough to 
present a large class of women who feel the need for such clubs 
as New York and London show. The wealthy women here al- 
ready have two clubs thai are cut fairly well after the man pat- 
tern. Like their brother clubs, neither the Francisca nor the 
Town and Gown Club- give mental massage; they were not in- 
augurated as short cuts to higher attainment. They provide 
creature comforts, including luncheon, ami there are bed-rooms 
lor the suburbanite who finds it suits her pleasure or convenience 
lo spend the night in town. The initiation fees and the dues 
are not as prohibitive a- the Xew York priees quoted, hot they 
would he exorbitant for a middle-class income. They by no 
means cater to all the demands of a man's club, bul they follow 
timidly along those lines. 

© © © 

Tin' Sequoia Club was inspired by a desire lo create a salon 

in San Francisco lo give men and women an Opportunity to i 

at night and enjoy intellectual conversation. I doubt whether 
the very founders would claim success, and yet the idea seemed 
fairly feasible at the time — far more so than a club where "mid- 
dle-class" women might find comfort and entertainment day or 
night. All the Sequoians set out to do was to he very clever 
one night of the week. Of course, the French salon did not 
have its beginnings in any such artificial manner. A large 
group of people did not say "we will play at having a salon the 
second and fourth Thursdays, 'fin French salon was a brilliant, 
inspiring woman, entirely surrounded by her peers, 'the Sequoia 
Club is now a large body of bromides entirely surrounded by 
bores." 

© © © 

There is no disputing the feasibility of bunding a club where 
women may foregather at night to discuss Ibsen or phvj bridge — 
i< sort of club which is just an extension of the daytime activi- 
ties of clubwomen — an inexpensive relaxation. I'.ut that is not 
ib.' man-idea club. Granted the feasibility of extending the 
."mill's club after sun-down, there is .i qic-iion about its in- 
luence for good, 'flic "middle-class" wife or mother, with 
anifold duties, would not be the woman to seek its pleas- 
anlages. The woman with clubitis, wdio is so inter- 
i) her club work that ahe makes a sort of rag carpel of her 
days trying to get in all the club duties, this woman would he 

the one to join the night club, and BO devote her nights as well as 
her days to club work. The professional woman would be as un- 
likely to join one of these night clubs thai give instruction as 
would fhe middle-class housewife. The man-idea club would 
io a number of professional women, but the regular 
woman's club turned into :i symposium of night owls Mould not 
Snd much fresh material to work with. The present stand-pat- 
ters for clubs would furnish the membership. 



Burns Hammam Baths 

Sulphur Baths — Electric Baths 

Eddy and Van Ness Ave. and Kearny and Jackson Streets 
LADIES' DEFT.- Eddy and Van Ness Ave. only 



.Iii.y 16. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



13 




PlMWE'SliM) 



no, j g ,*,<~sw/ib au * ) :.s.n ji 




The Orpheum. 

Once again this popular house is offering a hill composed 
mainly of the very best and representative attractions that vau- 
deville can afford. < *n 1 1 1 l- whole it is most satisfactory. The 
[ate comers this week will miss an extraordinary animal act. The 
trio of animals concerned is a huge elephant, a horse and a pony. 
But they certainly do stunts which we have never seen even in 
the heyday of our best circus days; The elephant in particular 
Bhows that he is possessed of almost human intelligence. Alto- 
gether ii is one of the very best acts of the kind 1 have ever seen 
outside of (he tented arena. Dear old Fanny Rice is given the 
next place on the programme. This time she offers us some 
rather clever imitations of popular persons both on and off the 
stage. The act is extremely novel and quite original, and Miss 
Bice deserves credit for offering us something really new, or 
rather something old, given in a new way. Aubrey Pringle and 
George Whiting are next in a sort of melange of talking and 
singing. One of them, 1 1 1) ink it is Pringle, is a very clever and 
unctuous comedian, while the other chap relies on his good look, 
and a fair singing voice to pull him through. As a brief diver- 
sion, their act is innocent enough and mildly entertaining, 
though their popularity was mostly in evidence in the upper 
part of the house. Marion Murray and her company of four 
people present one ot those inane affairs consuming twenty min- 





,rl,n will appear in "Th« Future uf I 

- lay matii(, 



Henrietta Cms, mm in a scene from "AnU-Matrimowf," the 
whimsical comedy by Percy ttacKayc, wi which she will I"- seen 
at the Columbia Theatre two weeks, beginning Monday, July is. 

nies. which has neither rhyme nor reason. It is written accord- 
ing to the programme by Edgar Allan Woolf, whom we newr 

Id believe guilty of such an atrocity. It is a pity thai really 

lever i pie have to waste their time and ability on such effort 

\ few laughs are extracted, but the acl is "iilo.nl question a 
failure, and the one weak number on the bill. After the inter- 
mission we are introduced to Mi-- 1 . 1 1 \ Lena, another London 

music hall Eavorite. I believe Mi-- Lena has been seen here be- 
fore, but ii is my lirsl glim r. Of course the inevitable 

comparison will aris een the lady in question and Vesta 

Victoria and Alice Lloyd, all of whom have been -ecu here very 
recently. In lull justice to the three ladies, I should rank Miss 
Llovd firsl and Miss Victoria second, and the lady occupying 
the boards this >■ 

\l i-- Lena is fairly attractive, and works hard to please. She 
:. mat is, if it can lie called singing. 
Two of her numbers arc very reminiscent of songs snug by her 
rtera. She seems to 

several times, and ; s quite gracious in the mailer of en m 

Next in order we come to our old favorites. Will Creasy and 

e Dayne. Mr is written qnel to 

his other big success, "Town Hall To-night." His latest effu- 
sion he entitles "One Nighl Duly." If anything, it contains 
funnier lines than its predecessor. Ci rtunity 

for the disp] dry humor, and his quaint way of express- 

ing matters. It is n ti lifferent from many of 

; vauderi] ; usually pass muster as having 

• and his wife a ircuit. 

The bis, 'lie bill i« imself 

He entertains with a violin. In the first place 
olates all the conventional traditions of the usual violinist 
'ling his instrument between his knees, and 
daring his numbers. He - i wonderful 

pression. and bobs his head in all I in a bewildering 

|| , - :rom rag-time to grand opera, 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



and he goes from one to the other without a moment's pause. 
His repertoire includes many numbers that have a popular lilt, 
and that are everywhere whistled, and this helps matters. It 
is not so much what he does as how he does it. He is entirely 
different from any musical act we have ever seen. That he has 
made a big vocal hit is evidenced by the fact that after the first 
performance he was moved to the best place on the programme. 
His act runs well over a half hour. It is well worth seeing. The 
programme is closed with a dancing number devised and pro- 
duced by Loie Fuller. There are eight lady participants. Talk 
about your Maud Allans and her bare-legged exposition. Here 
we have eight of them. It is an exhibition of nether extremities 
that we have never seen before, even in the cause of Terpsichore. 
The bald-headed contingent certainly should be in its element 
this week. From an artistic standpoint it is very interesting, 
and the light effects are both novel and pretty. The entire act 
is permeated with Loie Fuller effects, which we have been famil- 
iar with during her engagements locally. It is a worthy act, 
even if it is daring. The moving pictures are fair. Enormous 
houses are still tne vogue, and choice Beats must be secured well 
in advance. This certainly attests the hold this popular house 
has on San Franciscans. 



■James K. Hackett at the Alcazar. 

It must be more than a decade since Hackett was in this part 
of the country. In those days he was generally regarded as our 
most promising voting romantic actor, and he was the matinee 
girls' idol, with absolutely no one to dispute his popularity. Since 
those days he lias had a somewhat van' d i in r. He has, on the 
whole, been successful in his undertakings. He has become a 
New York manager, and has had a theatre in the Metropolis 
named after himself. He has produced a number of plays ill 
which he has achieved considerable success. Until last evening 
I had not seen Hackett since the days when he was at the height 
of his popularity as Prince Rudolph in '"The Prisoner of Zenda." 
It is a pleasure to record that Hackett still retains all the fire 
and ardor of his earlier days, but as an actor there is an im- 
provement of fully fifty per cent. In this connection, tie re is 
an immense improvement, and there is no question but that 
Hackett must now be accounted one of the foremost of our 
American actors. Physically and temperamentally he is superb- 
ly endowed. He is a big man capable of doing big things. He 
is still a young man, with the best years of his career yet before 
him. There are many of the younger generation, particularly 
among the aforesaid ladies who worship ai the shrine of the mati- 
nee idol, who will have their first glimpse of Hackett. During 
bis short stay here, he is to give a repertoire of his best plays, 
including some of his earlier successes. The Alcazar manage- 
ment deserves thanks for bringing such a sterling actor to its 
house and playing him at popular prices. This popular stock 
house should be crowded to the doors at every performance, and 
from indications this seems to be the case, as the houses this 
week have been filled to overflowing, and deservedly so. The 
play selected for the opening bill is one of the late efforts of 
that capable young French dramatist, Henri Bernstein. His 
most successful effort that we have witnessed locally is "The 
Thief." The play being done this week, entitled "Samson," 
was first brought out in this country by William (iillette. The 
latter was not an alarming success, as he was first of all not 
fitted physically for the part. Alter a brief New York run, (iil- 
lette gave it up, and it was then that Hackett secured the play 
and made a great personal success of the leading role. It is a 
part requiring virility, and suggesting strong dominating power 
as well as physical force and brute power. Bernstein has not 
written a great play, but there are undoubtedly BOme great 
moments in it, moments that grip you with bands of steel, m. 
it is in situations of this kind that Hackett rises to great heights 
of dramatic power. On one or two occasions, he goes danger- 
ously near to the ranting line, but he has sense and discretion 
enough not to step over. It is my first glimpse of Hackett in a 
modern role. For many year" he was never seen in anything but 
a costume role, and the habiliments of to-day no doubt at first 
must have seemed strange to him. Emu if he does becomi big 
of voice in his big dramatic moments, it can be said of him that 
he fully realises the value of repression and of light and shade, 
and in his love scenes he is simply perfection. The dear matinee 
girls will soon discover that Hacketl is the ideal lover of our 
American stage. "Samson" is a play of the present, smacking 



of the stock market and essentially modern. It has improbabili- 
ties, but they serve admirably the author's purpose, and he man- 
ages to build up to several strong climaxes by their use. The 
play is placed in Paris, and brings out vividly the rottenness of 
the upper strata of societv. Bernstein has never been known to 
disguise facts. He is frightfully plain spoken, and many things 
he says are not for the ear of the innocent and unsophisticated. 
He tells startling tiuths in a straightforward manner, veiling 
nothing. It does us good to hear an ace called an ace. to have 
our faults pointed out in all their nakedness, and not glossed 
over. We look at each other surreptitiously, amazed to be told 
of such things in plain words, and it hurts us. too, but it points 
a moral and makes us think, and that with many of us means 
a great deal, because unconsciously we are resolving to try and 
do our little to remedy the evils of our own social system. Mr. 
Hackett has brought with him his own leading lady. Miss Bea- 
fcrici I'.eekley. an English actress, in fad so English that we miss 
many of her best lines. She is of the tall and willowy order, not 
specially blessed with good looks, but still attractive. She is 
very sincere, though not very convincing. Still, she cannot help 
but be moderately effective in playing opposite an actor of the 
worth and quality of Hackett. Arthur Hoops, who has been with 
Hackett for some years playing the villain roles, is also here. 
He certainly has a despicable role this week. Hoops is as ever 
the same stiff and strained personality, a fair actor, yet falling 
short of excellence. He is naturally dominated by the star, but 
is at the same time a welcome acquisition. The remainder of the 
cast is composed of the regular Alcazar players, with one ex- 
ception, Charies Ounn being called in to play a fine juvenile 
role. Gunn has a good voice and pleasing presence. I could not 
forgive him his ill-fitting dress suit nor his shambling walk. 
His work, however, was most satisfactory. From indications, 
Mr. Bclasco is to be congratulated on the new ingenue, Catherine 
Calhoun. She is of decidedly pleasing presence, petite and gra- 
cious, and her work in mis play was delightfully satisfactory. She 
dressed the part beautifully, and evidently knows how to wear 
clothes. She seems to be a happy selection, and if so, will till 
the hardest place on the Alcazar roster, that of Miss Barriscale. 



Columbia Theatre 

Gottlob, Marx & Co., Managers. 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phone Franklin 150. 
Home C 6781. 



Two weeks, beginning Monday, July 18th. Matinee Saturday. A 
fortnight of solid laughter, HENRIETTA GROSSMAN In Perc; 

Mat'Kiiyc's whim ■ i'-;i i <■>'> 1>". 

ANTI-MATRIMONY, 
The most notable comedy hit of the past ten years. 

Alcazar Theatre sss^jk-s&Wi ««. 

Belasco and Mayer, Owners and Managers. 

Week commencing Monday evening, July isth. the dlstSnguUrtied 

American actor, james k, HACKETT, supported by Beatrice 
Becklev, Arthur Hoops and the Alcazar players, in 

MONSIEUR BEAUCA1RE, 
A dramatization of Booth Tarklngton's famous novel. 
Prices — Night. 25c. to $1: Matinee, 25c, to 50c. Matinee Saturday 
and Sunday. Scats for sale at box-office and Emporium. 

New Orpheum s^ausrs- ^ 

Sifesi end Most Mignifieeat Theitre in America. 
Y\v.-k beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every flay. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
EDWARDS DAWS 41 CO invents his ..iii_-lri.il rtrnmatlZaUon of 
"The Picture- of Dorian Gray." by "war Wil.i. ■. JAMES THORN- 
TON; THE IMPERIAL .M PSK.'IANS: PROF. Al'DAI.E'S ZOO CIR- 
CUS: SIGNOR TRAVATO; JOLLY FANN1 RICE; PRINGLB & 
WHITING; NEW ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES. East week. 
great success MARION MURRAY & CO., in "The Prima Donnas 
i [oneymoon." 

Coming— ANNE i'TE KELM3RMAN. 

Evening prices — 10c. .-» .. 50c, 75c. Box Beats, -*i Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 35c, 50c. Phones Douglas 70; 
I lome C 157". 



Savoy Theatre 



McAllister Street, 
Above Market. 

TO-LET 

By the afternoon, evening or week, till August 1, 1910. 
Apply at theatre office daily, from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



HOTHER WISMER, Violinist, 

Will resume teaching Aug. 1st, at his residence 

2945 Fillmore Street near Union 

Saturdays in Berkeley. 2525 COLLEGE AVENUE 



July lti, L910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Weaner is good, and Bennison and Walling arc both satisfactory 
in small parts. Miss Belgarde is verj satisfactory, and would 
be more bo if she could gel away from an occasional lapse, where 
in she pitches her voice aggravatingly high. The settings are 
certainly beautiful for a production of one week. Without 
doubt the AU-azar will be crowded to capacity during the uexl 

few weeks. We are in for a genuine dramatic treat, ami I rec - 

mend every sincere theatre-goer not to miss Hie menu of good 
things which will be spread on the dramatic boards of the popu- 
lar Suiter street playhouse. 

A D VANCE A NNO UNCKMENTS. 

News comes from London that Morris Meyerfekl, President 
and Martin Beck, General Manager, of the Orpheum Circuit, 
have recently consummated probably the most important deal 
in the history of vaudeville, and one that will be far reaching in 
its effects. 

Messrs. Meyerfeld and Beck have just concluded with the re- 
cently formed Variety Theatres Controlling Company, whose 
headquarters is at Harwell House, Charing-Cross road, and of 
which Alfred Butt is the chairman and Walter Gibbons and 
Walter De Freee. members of the Board of Directors, negotia- 
tions for the affiliation of the Orpheum Circuit with it. The 
properties acquired by the Variety Theatres Controlling Com- 
pany include the well known Barrasford Circuit, and also the 
booking arrangements in connection with the celebrated De 
Freee Circuit and the London Theatres of Variety (Limited.) 
In addition to this, the company has secured the Alhambra, 
Paris. 

Messrs. Meyerfeld and Beck are also associated with the 
Variety Theatres Controlling Company in the construction and 
equipment of a first-class vaudeville theatre in Berlin. 

By next year, when the Berlin theatre is ready for occupation, 
it will be possible for the Orpheum to give artists a month's en- 
gagement in Berlin, a month in Paris, a month at the Palace, 
London, a subsequent tour of the English provinces, and there- 
after to send them across the Atlantic to make the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit tour from New York to San Francisco. 

The news of this remarkable deal caused quite a sensation in 
London, and enabled Messrs. Meyerfeld and Beck to sign quite 
a number of the foremost vaudeville artists, among whom are 
several feminine stars of equal celebrity to Vesta Victoria. 

Mr., Beck arrived by the "Kronzprinsessen Cecil" in New York 
Ihis week, and Mr. Meyerfeld is expected to shortly follow him, 

and may be looked for in this cilv about the end of nexl mouth. 

• * * 

The programme next week at the Orpheum will be headed 
by Edwards Davis, M. A., and his company in his own dramatiza- 
tion of Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray." Whatever 
may be the genera] opinion of the worth of Wilde's philosophy, 
there is no denying his genii's and the biting truth of man] ol 
his cynicisms. 

James Thornton, lunnorisl and song writer, will appear in a 
series of songs and timel] sayings, Thornton's popularity is as 
great in this city as in the others of ibis country, and his 
lion is sure to be in the nature of an ovation. 

A new military act, "The Imperial Musicians," will be pre- 
sented Eor the fust time here next week. Ii i- the work oi the 
celebrated producer, .less,' I.. Leaky. The company consists ol 
eleven soloists, each of whom is a qualified exponent of his or 
her instrument. 

Professor Apdale's trained animals will introduce a "Zoo Cir- 
cus." which includes dogs, monkeys, eats, ponies and a little 
brown hear called Jess, Pro , \ >> ! '>■ b bo presents -the onlj 
educated ant-eater in the world. Next week will be the last r>f 
Pringle and Whiting. Fanny Rice, Signor Travato and Marion 

Murrai & Co., in "The Prima Donna's Honeymoon." 

• * * 

One of the important events of the dramatic season is the com- 
ing of Hi arietta t'rosman to the Columbia Theatre for an en- 
gagement of two weeks, commencing next Monday evening, July 
18th. in her biggest comedy success. "Anti-Matrimony." M -- 
Crosman's return is a matter of great interest to playgoers who 
appreciate the very best in modern comedy. Her welcome' is 
doubly assured when she brings a play by Percy Maclxaye. - 
well known here as a playwright ol exceptional genius. 

• • • 

.lames K. Hackelt will find striking Opportunity to digpl 

manly graces hi "Monsieur Beaucaire." the play selected for his 



second week al the Alcazar, commencing nexl Monday evening. 
It «as adapted by Booth Tarkington and Evelyn Greenleaf 
Sutherland from a French story, ami the late Richard Mansfield 

iid ii one ot his mosl successful vehicles, ft is his version 

that Mr. Hacked, the i.nl\ American actor qualified to do it 
jusl ice, ha, adopted. 



Kirke La Shelle met an actor and noticed that he was 

wearing a mourning band on his arm. "It's for my father," the 
actor explained. "I've just come from his funeral." La Shelle 
expressed his sympathy. The actor's grief was obviously very 
real and great. "I attended to all the funeral arrangements," he 
said. "We had everything just as lather would have liked it." 
"Were there many there?" asked La Shelle. "Many there!" 
cried the actor with pride. "Why, my boy, we turned 'em away." 
— Success. 




LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



—GREEN AND YELLOW— 

The original and genuine Chartreuse has always been and 
still Is made by the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), who, 
since their expulsion from France, have been located at Tarra- 
gona, Spain; and. although the old labels and Insignia originated 
by the Monks have been adjudged by the Federal Courts of this 
country to be still the exclusive property of the Monks, their 
world renowned product Is nowadays known as "Liqueur Pdres 
Chartreux." 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers. Hotels, Cafes. 

B&tler & Co., 46 Broadway. New York. N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



CINZANO 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



The Standard of Quality 
the World Over 



ALEX. D. SHAW & CO. 



United States Agents 
Saa Francisco 



Chic*(o 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



K3o~<3r 



^CffiTX 



I'llTI 




Mrs. Francis Cardan's prediction is getting warm. She has 
always 1 maintained that Eleanor Seare would make a brilliant 
match, and now comes the rumor that Bhe is engaged to Paul 
Rainey, sportsman and spender at the rate of over a million a 
year. " Miss Sears is s eyelone of energy, and match-making 
mothers have watched askance her influence on the girls with 
whom she comes in contact. "Men don't like a girl who exercises 
until she looks like an ossified beet," said one Burlingame 
mother, "and that's what all our girls are coming to under Miss 
Sears' influence.'' Mrs. Carolan enthusiastically defended the 
charms of her house guest, and went on record that she would 

shake down a big juicy plum from the mat ri nial tree. Mi-s 

Scar- has that talent I'm- keeping in the public eve which ani- 
mated Alice Roosevelt before her marriage. She is not so agreed 
able to newspaper people as was the ex-President's daughter, but 
she takes naturally to stunts that gravitate into print. 

Paul Rainey has sailed on an Arctic expedition, and if \li~ 
Sears is really engaged to him she will find time a drug. I 
Suggest that Miss Sears invent a way id' settling wagers in the 
urn hobble skirls. For it was the athletic Eleanor who con- 
ceived the "garter whirl." as the real, refined, lady-like way 
of -en lino ;, dispute. It was rather a dizzy method, to be sura, 
but as long as skirts were prolific in fullness, ii proved very 
effective. Now that the skirts arc pulled in to an abbreviated 
and scant allowance, the "garter whirl" is impossible. 

This unique method, ably expounded by Miss Sears and aptly 
imitated by her little set of intimates, required Unify ruffles, 

Tl nly time I saw it illustrated was at the station al San 

Mateo. Miss Eleanor Sears, Miss Jennie Crocker and Mr-. Os- 
car Cooper were waiting For a train, and the question of luncheon 
arose. Each generous girl claimed the right to hostess a hand- 
some repast. At last Miss Sears nonchalantly said: "Well, we'll 
have to whirl to see who wins." One. two. three, and three whirl- 
ing circles of lingerie spun before the astonished eves of the 
spectators. The girls stood on one foot, and with arms extended 
whirled until they looked like revolving circles of dry goods ami 
millinery and French underwear. "You win. Eleanor," called 
a girl friend who was one of tin- f\ -danders. "I saw your 
garter." 

Which gave me the cine to this highly intellectual pursuit. 
Evidently the winner of a whirl was she who could first show 
her garter. Afterwards 1 saw the three Eriends lunching a 
St. Francis, and Miss Sears proudly paid the hill — which privi- 
lege sin' had won by her superior gyrations. 
© © © 

The marriage of Miss Edith Simpson ami Roy Pile on Wed- 
nesday of this week was the tnosl noteworthy event on thi cal- 
endar. It was an unostentatious affair, as the Simpson family is 
still in mourning. The bride, who IS a handsomi girl, was at- 
tended by two matrons of honor. Mrs. George C ion aid Mrs. 

Lawrence Harris, she haying served both of these young matrons 
as a bridesmaid. Her gown wa- thi conventional white satin, 
high-neck robe. Even in conservative England, many of the 
wedding robes sho^i a semi-decollete cm. .Mi-s Drexel, who re- 
cently married Lord Maidstone in London, has her bridal pic- 
tures on display in the shops and magazines, and the -own ig 
cut in a modest V-shaoe, which i- \ t\ Incoming to the girlish 
beauty of Lady Maidstone. 

Miss Simpson' was a handsome bride, aid received the - 

gratulations of her friends in that sincere, frankly delighted 
manner which endears her to every one. Her father gave her 

away, and also, as T am told, gave her the hands' i Simpson 

home on Pacific avenue. It is one of the costliest and most spa- 
cious homes on the avenue. After a shorl honeymoon, the Pikes 
will occupy this residence. Mrs. Ceorgc Cameron and Mrs. 
Larry Harris, the matrons of honor, not onl) gave exquisite 
gifts, hut in addition, the bride has in her trousseau two dainty 

bits of lingerie made entirely by hand, and every stitch a love 
stitch put in l.i) llic-c |»o friends. 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



Beginning September 1st, 1910, 
a Table d'Hote or American plan 
dining-room will be conducted 
in addition to the 
European or a la carte 
Restaurant. 



The young Roosevelts are going to keep house, and already an 
agent has several suitable houses Eor them to choose from jus) 
as soon as they return from Santa Barbara. The lovers of rare 
mahogany and rich old plate will have an opportunity to study 
and enjoy some of the finest, examples in America just as soon 
as the Roosevelts arc settled. Eor the Alexander heirlooms are 
catalogued among the finest extant in America, and Mrs. Alex- 
ander generously gave Iter daughter her share at her marriage. 
instead of exacting that sic wait until Death, the expert ac- 
countant, should go over the hooks ami decide how much of the 
mother's share accrues to the daughter. 

There are always some very interesting and historical pieces 
of furniture in San Francisco, and Mrs. Roosevelt's share of th i 
Alexander collection will be a noteworthy addition. Possibly 

the most interesting table in San Francisco is the handso 

round mahogany one which belongs to Mrs. Alfred Hunter Voor- 
hies and always lends dignity to her drawing room. It cnuic 
down to the Vnorhics family through the Madisons, and is the 
authentic table upon which the Treaty of Ghent was signed. 

Mrs. d. Mora Moss, »lei «;i- Margaret Foulkes, also has - 

wonderful old pieces of historical importance. 

.Mrs. H. Williams, of London, is planninu to \i-ii the Coast 
right after the London season, ami as the guest of Mrs. William 
Miller Graham. A In ml writes me that Mrs. Williams is a 
social broker in London just as undisputedly, though n 
openly, as Lady Duff Cordon is a dressmaker. She gets a large 
commission for smoothing out the wrinkles in the social path- 
way of an aspirant to the smart set. Her remarkable Buccess is 
attributed to the fact thai she never undertakes impossible 
material. A bounder, any one absolutely lacking in social sense, 
need not apply. Mrs. Graham has plenty of s,n-r,ir faire, and 
likewise plenty of money, so Mrs. Williams undertook her cam- 
paign with enthusiasm. This is the first season thai Mrs. Gra- 



LOS ANGELES 



B Y 



Steamer $11.50 

INCLUDING MEALS AND BERTH 

EVERY FIVE DAYS 



ALSO TO 



PORTLAND 

$15, $12 and S10 

INCLUDING MEALS AND BERTH 
Magnificent New Steamers 

BEAR, BEAVER AND ROSE CITY 



San Francisco and Portland Steamship Go. 

FLOOD BUILDING Tel. Kearny 3620 



.Titty 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



ham lias had a biir house in [iondon, and has come forward open 

lv for recognition as one of the smari hostesses to be reckoni 

with. She lias spent several seasons there, and has made mam 

helpful acquaintances, but this is her firsl essay as the 

lni I a house in Srosvenor Square. Ber initial party was a 

success, and introduced Anna Pavola, the Russian dancer, lo 

a smart London audience. Mrs. Graham always spends pari 

the lime she doles out to California in San Francisco, so the 

smart set here will have an opportunity to moil Mrs. Williams 

of London when she accompanies Mrs. Graham to the Coast. 
& © © 

The debutantes of next season are taking a preliminary ram 
as hostesses at house parties. Miss Ysabel Chase has had a 
procession of guests at Stag's Leap, the Napa home of the 
Chases. She is a wonderful little horsewoman, and has a mount 
which lew girls would dare to ride. Her mother, who cares more 
for music, and is a superior pianiste, says that Ysabel would live 
on a horse if some one would serve her meals to her. Miss Ethel 
Crocker likewise always has a number of young guests at her 
home in Burlingamo. but they spend their time reading, sewing 
and driving, for the Paris doctors who recently operated on her 
for appendicitis have forbidden strenuous exercise. The Cun- 
ningham girls, Evelyn and Genevieve, have a round of house- 
parties at the Woodside home of their mother, Mrs. James 
Athearn Folger. They go for horseback riding and excel like 
their friend, Helen Cheseborough. At Castle Crag, Marie Kus- 
sell, Emily Tubbs, Elizabeth Shreve and Willctta O'Brien are 
exploring the mountain roads with as much enthusiasm as they 
will explore society in a season or two. 
© © © 

Mrs. Fred McNear has created quite a sensation at the Hotel 
Potter, where she is staying with a coterie of friends, including 
her sister, Florence Hopkins, her cousin, Marian Zeile, and Mary 
Keeney. She is known as the "bundle of energy," and has al- 
most discovered perpetual motion. She rides harder, motors 
faster, swims further and dances later than any woman in Santa 
Barbara. The other morning she did not appear until almost" 
noon time. "Thank heavens, you have been taking a rest." was 
the greeting from her friends. "Oh, I've been up since seven 
this morning," she nonchalant.lv replied, "hut I've been making 
over a dinner dress that I didn't like." And still the critic 
prates of the idleness of the wealthy. 



CANDY FOR HER VACATION. 

It will add to the pleasure of her stay in the country. Can be se?it 
by express from any one of Geo. Haas & Seas 1 four candy stores: Phelan 
Building; Fillmore at talis; Van Ness at Sutter; and 88 Market street, 
near Perry. 



Pictures of all kinds made and framed to order by Fowzer, the ar- 
tist photographer. 3126 Sixteenth street, near Valencia. Finest child- 
ren's and professional work in the city. Photographs any time, any 
size, any price, any place. 



DRESS YOUR HAIR WELL 

The New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors at 
130 Geary, near Grant avenue, are equipped 
with all European and up-to-date appli- 
ances for Hair Dressing and Manicuring. 

MRS. A. W. FINK 

Has had extensive and varied experience 
in European and Eastern Hair Dressing Par- 
lors and has introduced many new ideas. 

SPECIAL, FOR THIS WEEK ONLY, 

Great Sacrifices in 3J and 4 ounce, 36-in. Switches 

Parisian Nail Bleach, KSk^Ana*. 

Try a course of scalp treatments by our well known 
specialist. Given by the Therapeutic System. 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK— Ten Treatments, $5.00 

New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors 

130 GEARY STREET 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF JAMES 'WOODS 

The farthest 
advance of 
science in 
service 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $ 2.50, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up. 
VCith bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

A comfortable, hierh order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN, formerly manager of St. 

Duncan's. 



Hotel Von Dorn 

242 Turk St., San Francisco 



REMODELED AND UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



Telephones: Franklin 3666 
Home C 3666 



Rates: European S i .00 and up 
American $2.60 and up 



Geo. A. Eastman, Manager 



HOTEL WINDSOR 

308-310 West 58th Street, "Wpw York 

One hundred feet from Broadway '"Cn 1 til IV 

ALBERT J. ARROLL, Proprietor 
(Formerly of San Francisco) 

100 Suites, each with Bath. Tariff 52. SO to *10. 00 per day. 
Special arrangements by the week. In the heart of the shop- 
ping arid theatrical district. Convenient to subway, elevated 
and surlace car lines. Two minutes walk from Central Park. 
Cuisine unsurpassed. Service a la carte. 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



Incompatibly better than any other in its class 
A Little Lower Priced Than the Others 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

118-117 Kearny Street near Post 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



Jdlt 16, 1910. 



§©dM mindl IP®irs®ffii(si Otams 



Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



WEDDINGS. 

Simpson -Pike. — June 12. — Miss Edith Simpson and Mr. Roy Pike were 
married at St. Luke's Church at 9 o'clock, June 12th. Bishop Nichols 
officiating, 

Turner-Ruhlen. — July 16th — Miss Emma Turner and Lieutenant George 
Ruhlen, Jr., V. S. A., marriage will take place in the chapel at the 
Presidio, July 16th. A reception will follow the church ceremony at 
the residence of Captain and Mrs. Stopford at the Presidio. 

WEDDINGS TO COME. 
Draper- Kaufman. — Miss Elsa Draper and Midshipman James Lawrence 
Kaufman, U. S. N.; marriage is to be celebrated in September at the 
home of Mrs. T. Wain-Morgan Draper in San Rafael. 

LUNCHEONS. 

Blandfng. — Miss Henriette Blanding presided over a merry luncheon at 
the Fairmont Hotel. 

Butters. — Miss Marguerite Butters, chaperoned by Mrs. J. S. Peters, en- 
tertained Monday informally at a luncheon at the St. Francis. 

Cameron. — Mrs. George Cameron was hostess on Tuesday, July 6th, at 
a handsomely appointed luncheon, when Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran 
was the guest of honor. 

Champlln. — Mrs. Champlin entertained eight guests at a luncheon at the 
Fairmont Monday. 

Crocker. — Charles Templeton Crocker, who arrived early Tuesday from 
Santa Barbara, after an enjoyable Fourth, entertained friends at the 
Hotel St. Francis. 

Curran. — One of the prettiest and smartest luncheon parlies of the week 
was given at the Palace by Miss Curran, who motored in from the 
country on Monday. The table was beautifully decked with roses 
and ferns. The guests included Mrs. Clem Tobin, Mrs. Worthington 
Armes, Mrs. Rooney. Miss Cooke, Miss Lily O'Connor and Miss 
Frances Stewart. 

Hamilton. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton entertained at a luncheon 
at the Hotel St. Francis complimentary to Mrs. Perkins. 

Hearst. — Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, who is in town for a brief visit, was 
hostess at an informal luncheon at the Fairmont. 

Kellogg. — Mrs. Lansing Kellogg was a luncheon hostess Tuesday at ,the 
St. Francis. 

Lowery. — Stewart Lowery was a recent host at an informal luncheon at 
the St Francis. 

Lee. — Mrs. Cuyler Lee entertained recently at a delightful luncheon at 
the Lodge at Pebble Beach, and another afternoon gave a very elabo- 
rate little tea for some of her friends who are sojourning at Del 
Monte. 

Martin. — Miss Francis Martin, who recently returned from Europe, enter- 
tained several friends at luncheon at the St. Francis Tuesday. 

McGregor. — Mr. and Mrs. J. VV. McGregor entertained at luncheon at the 
St. Francis Monday in honor of Governor Frear and Mrs. Frear of 
Hawaii. 

Simons. — Mrs. Manly H. Simons was hostess at an elaborate luncheon 
In her hospitable Mare Island home recently. 

Umbsen. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Umbsen entertained several friends In- 
formally at luncheon at the St. Francis. 

Whitney. — Mrs. Vincent Whitney entertained at an informal luncheon 
at the St. Francis on Tuesday. 

DINNERS. 

Buck. — Major and Mrs. Carroll Buck entertained at an informal dinner 
given at the Fairmont. 

Dunne. — Peter F. Dunne was host on July 7th at an elaborate dinner at 
the Palace Hotel. Later his guests occupied a box at the Columbia 
Theatre. 

Huff.— Lieutenant and Mrs. C. P. Huff were hosts on July 6th at a de- 
lightful dinner at their home on Verba Buena Island. The compli- 
mented guests were Mrs. Charles Klndelberger and Mrs. Ralph 
Saeltzer. 

Pillsbury. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace D. Plllsbury entertained recently at a 
handsomely appointed dinner given at the St. Francis. A theatre 
party followed. 

DANCE. 

Breeden. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden entertained at a dinner 
dance at the Montecito Club Saturday evening. 

Marvin. — Miss Marian Marvin was hostess at an informal dance at Mill 
Valley. The affair was given in the residence Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Somers are occupying. 

U. S. S. Charleston. — The Captain and officers aboard the U. S. 3". 
Charleston were hosts at a matinee dance recently. 

CARDS. 
Crlssy.— Mrs. M. C. Crissy entertained at a bridge tea on Wednesday af- 
ternoon in her attractive home at the Presidio, In compliment to 
Mrs. Apple, wife of Captain George Apple, U. S. A. 

TEA. 
Newhall.— Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Newhall entertained at an informal t.;i 
on Saturday In honor of the arrival of Miss Virginia Newhall from 
Dana Hall, Boston. 



Ryer. — Mrs. Fletcher Ryer and her daughter, Miss Doris Ryer, who are 
at Del Monte, entertained a group of friends by a motor ride to 
Pebble Beach on Monday and a delightfully arranged tea at the Lodge. 

PICNICS. 

Irwin. — Miss Helene Irwin gave a delightful picnic on Sunday at Santa 
Barbara to some thirty friends who were summering at the Southern 
resort. 

Malone. — Mr. and Mrs. Drury Malone were hosts at a large picnic on Mon- 
day in the Napa Valley, not far from their beautiful home, "Oak 
Knoll." 

HOUSE PARTIES. 

Castner. — Captain and Mrs. Joseph C. Castner entertained friends from 

town over the last week end at their quarters at Fort Mel unveil. 

Angel Island. 
Chase. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace B. Chase have as their guests, the three 

Calhoun boys and young Carrington, at Stags Leap. 
Fisher. — William Fisher was a recent host at his attractive country home 

at Mountain View. Mrs. James P. Langhorne chaperoned a bevy of 

charming society belles. 
Morrison. --The Misses Morrison entertained a large house party over the 

Fourth of July, an alfresco luncheon being served to their guests in 

the gardens of their home, 

MOTORING. 

Adams. — Mr. and Mrs. Lawson Adams left Thursday for a motor trip to 
Los Angeles in their new touring car. 

Conaty. — A jolly motor party from Los Angeles spending several days at 
the Palace was that of Miss Kate C. Conaty, a sister of Archbishop 
Conaty of the Los Angeles Diocese. Miss Conaty's guests were 
Miss McDermatt and Miss Lynch, also of Los Angeles. 

Carolan. — Mr. and Mrs. James Carolan and Miss Emily Carolan were at 
Santa Cruz for a brief sojourn. They made the visit by motor. 

Cluff. — Mr. and Mrs. William Cluff an<f Miss Florence ClufC are leaving 
for a motor trip down the coast as far as San DiegO. 

Foil is. — James Follis and his brother-in-law, Stanford Owlnn. have re- 
turned from their automobile trip to Reno, and are again in San 
Rafael. 

Hook.— Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Hook, who are prominent persona of Los An- 
geles, made the trip up the road in their touring car. 

Murphy. — From the South, one of the motoring parties at Del Monte of 
last week Included Mr. and Mrs. Dan Murphy, Miss Sue Lynch, Miss 
K. A. Conaty, Miss A. McDermott, all of Los Angeles, who are mak- 
ing the Los Angeles-San Francisco run in Mr. Murphy's big Plerce- 
Arrow. 

Preston. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Preston, of San Francisco, motored to Del 
Monte In their Buick for the week end, bringing with them Mr. and 
Mrs. C. A. Fellows, Miss C. Smith, of Los Angeles. On Tuesday Mr. 
Preston and his friends drove out to the Lodge at Pebble Beach for 
luncheon there. 

Queen. — Mr. and Mrs. Richard Queen, Mrs. Frederick Woods and Miss 
Maud Woods, left Monday for a month's motor trip through Lake an-1 
Mendocino Counties. 

Wheeier. — Roy Wheeler, one of the most popular and congenial dub and 
society men of Pasadena, Jxis Angeles" "Millionaire Suburb." was In 
town at the Palace for several days during the week, having motored 
up In his great touring car to meet the Reverend and Mrs-. i;«.|..-ii 
Burdette, of Pasadena, who returned from a trip to the Orient. 

ARRIVALS. 
Bourn.— Miss Ida Bourn la the guest of Mrs. James Potter Langhorne In 

her Pacific avenue home. 
Bliss. — Mrs. D. L. Bliss and Miss Hope Bliss have arrived it their country 

home at Tahoe, after a year's absence in the East. 
Bfgelow. — Mrs. S. C. Bigelow is the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel 

Austen Wood, at the latter's country home neat Palo Alto. 
Bingham. — Harold Bingham lias returned from Hill Crest; the summer 

home of Mr. and Mrs. William Tubbs, In the Napa Valley. Beverly 

Tucker and Stephen Kinsey also enjoyed the holiday there. 
Brinegar. — Mr. and Mrs. E. Brlnegar have returned from Del Monte and 

Carmel-by-the-Sea 
Borel. — Mr. and Mrs. Antolne Borel are again at their San Mateo home 

after an outing of several weeks at Tahoe. 
Curran. — Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran recently arrived from Paris, and Is 

at the Palace Hotel. She will be In California for some weeks. 
Carter. — Lieutenant Arthur II. Carter, TJ. £?. A., ami Mrs. Carter (Mar- 

jorie Sells) arrived In San Francisco en route to Manila. They are 

at the St. Francis. 
Calhoun. — Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Calhoun and Miss Martha Calhoun have 

returned from Shasta. 
Crocker. — Miss Jennie Crocker, accompanied by her brother, Charles Tem- 
pleton Crocker, returned Tuesday from Santa Barbara, where they 

spent the week-end. 
Dunning. — Major Samuel W. Dunning. T*. S. A., and Mrs. Dunning, ar- 
rived Tuesday on the transport Sheridan from Honolulu. They will 

remain at the Fairmont during their brief stay. 
DHshire. — Miss Doris Dllshire has returned from Lake Tahoe, where she 

was the guest of Mrs. W. S. Porter. 



Beautiful Willow Plumes 

Made from old feathers and 
boas or new material furnished 

Phone West 221 1398 O'Farrell Street 

GUARANTEE— No Fibers can be Shaken from Plumes I Willow. 



Jri.v 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



Geissler. — Arthur Geissler is the guesl nd Mrs. George M. Mooie 

In Ross. Mrs. Geissler (Caro Moore) has been with her parents Coi 
: a fortnight. 

Grace. — Francis J. Grace is back from Ireland, has been foi 

the past year with relatives. 

Hunt. — Miss Natalie Hunt lias returned from Mill Valley, whore she has 
been the guest of Miss Marian Marvin. 

Harvey. — Mrs Downey Harvey accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Oscar 
Cooper, on their return from Del Monte last Monday, and rs visiting 
them at their Burlingame home. 

Hannlgan. — Miss Josephine- Hannlgan has returned from Mill Valley after 
having enjoyed a visit with Miss Isabel and Miss Marie Brewer. 

Jordan. — Mrs. J. C, Jordan has returned from a motor trip to Laker Tahoe. 

Keilam. — Mrs. Frederick Keliam and her children returned Wednesd i 
from a month's sojourn at Applegate, and are at their Pacific avenue 
home. 

Knox. — Mrs. S. J. Knox, Mrs. "William Knox and Mrs. Elsie Knox Jen- 
nings have returned from Aetna Springs, and are again occupying 
their apartment at the St. Xavier. 

Lunlng. — Mrs. Oscar Luning has returned from a visit to Livermore. 

Mills. — Ogden Mills, Jr., who arrived from the East a few days ago, is 
the guest of Miss Jennie Crocker and Templeton Crocker at Uplands. 

Maynard. — Miss Eva Maynard returned to her Pacific avenue home last 
week, after an enjoyable visit with her sister, Mrs. William Gwin. 
in San Rafael. 

Murtaugh. — Mrs. Murtaugh and her children arrived Wednesday from 
Fort Leavenworth for a visit with her mother, Mrs. J. De Barth 
Shorb. 

McMullin.— Miss Eliza McMullin, who has been with Mrs. John McMullin 
for some weeks at Stockton, has returned to her Oakland home after 
a pleasant visit with friends at the Mare Island Navy Yard. 

McGavin. — Mrs. Walter McGavin has returned to town after an enjoyable 
visit with Miss Edith Pillsbury at Montecito. 

Monsarrat. — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Monsarrat have returned from Del 
Monte and Carmel-by-the-Sea. 

Nicholson. — Rear- Admiral and Mrs. K. F. Nicholson, from Washington, 
are among the recent arrivals at the Palace. 

Selby. — Mrs. Prentiss Selby and her son Arthur are here from the East, 
where Arthur has been to school. 

Stott. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Van Devender Stott. who have been visit- 
ing in the East, returned Tuesday to their home in this city. 

Simpson. — Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Simpson. Mrs. Bertha Simpson and Mrs. 
Tyrell came from Stockton to attend the wedding of Miss Edith Simp- 
son and Roy Pike. 

Stlmson. — Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Stimson, of Los Angeles, accompanied by 
Mrs. P. J. Waters and Miss M. E. Spencer, arrived from the South- 
ern city on a motor trip, and are at the Palace. 

Vallentlne. — Mrs. John J. Valentine and her family have returned to their 
home after an absence of nine months. 

Von Schroeder. — Baroness von Schroeder arrived from her country homo, 
and is for the present at the St. Francis. 

Wallace. — Mrs. Bradley Wallarr is a^ain nn-upvinn her handsome home 
on Clay street. Her son. Bradley Wallace, who is a student at Har- 
vard University, Is with her. 

DEPARTURES. 

Bogue. — Mr. Samuel Russell Bogue has left for the East and will probably 

be absent from San Francisco for several months. Mrs. Bogue is al 

present the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Bogue In Now York. 
Bourn. — Mr. and Mrs. William Bowers Bourn leave on Tuesday for an 

extended trip abroad. 
Burrell. — Mrs. Walter Burrell has returned to Portland after a month at 

the Palace. 
Coleman. — Mrs. Robert Coleman and Miss Clara Coleman of Hillsborough 

have gone for several weeks' enjoyment at Lake i i 
Chickerlng.— Mr. and Mrs ftogei I flickering, Mr, and .Mrs. Harry Chlck- 

erlng are at Ta hoe 
Clark. — Mr. and Mrs, Charles W. Clark .'i" San Mateo, are among the 

recent arrivals at Del Monte. 
Crellln. — Miss Jane Crellin has gone to Alaska; on her return will go to 

Castle Crags. 
Farnham.— Mr. and Mrs. Sylvatius Farnham are at th< 1 

Mateo, for the summer. Miss Elsie Clifford will be with them 

July. 
Frear.— Governor and Mrs. Krear. of Honolulu, with Miss Virginia Frear. 

Balled Tuesday on the Manchuria. 
Gregory.— Miss Mabel Gregory is in the Bast for the summer. 
Haenke.— Mr. and U Haenlw (Marie Churchill) have sailed foi 

Honolulu, where they will spend several months. 
Havens.— Mr and Mrs, Frank *' llav.-ns left for Sa« HarDOl 

Howard.— Mr. and Mrs. Shatter Howard ba\ •■ gone to El 

Kohl.— Mr. and Mrs. C. Frederick K open their Lakeside 

home at Taboo. 
King.— Miss Hazel King is visiting Miss Elisabeth Livermore at "Monte- 

sol," near Calistogn. 
McLaren.— Mr. and Mi? Norman McLaren, Mis? Constance McLa 
u McLaren haw gone to Lake altt nth. 



McNear.- Mr. and Mrs. John McN< . hortly, to be 

gone several months. 
Martin. M Krs, Peter Martin will g Lm Lattei pari 

Of tins month for a visit of several Wi 

Mead. --Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rlsdon Mead, accompanied bj Mrs. Thorn- 

burgh-Cropper, of London, and Miss L Herrln, have ^>ne to 

Crater Lake, near Klamath Falls, Oregon. 
Mintzer. — Miss MaurlcJe Mlntzer and her brother, William Mtntzer, an 

der the chaperonage of Miss Lucy Little, are spending a fa 

Yosemite. 
O'Connor.— Miss Maud O'Connor has joined Mr*. \v. s. Porter at Santa 

I la i ha i-ii . 
Peters. — Mrs. Charles Ilollo Peters has gone to Del Monte for a visit. 
having joined her sister. Mrs. Henry Schmied'-ll. 

Pierson. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Plerson arc at Blithedale for the sum- 
mer. 

Rathbone.— Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Rathbone are to be the quests of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Frederick Kohl at Lake Tahoe during August. 

Stone. — Mrs. Egbert Stone and her daughters spent the week at Del 
Monte*. 

Schwerin. — R. P. Schwerln sailed on the Manchuria Tuesday for the 
Orient, where he will spend several weeks. 

Splivaio. — Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Splivalo are at the Peninsula, where they 
will remain until their home in San Francisco is completed. 

Taylor. — Mr. and Mrs. Montell Taylor are at Tahoe Tavern for the sum- 
mer. 

Tucker. — Mrs. James Ellis Tiucker has joined her mother, Mrs. W. B. 
Bourn, Sr., in her country home in the Napa Valley. 

Tompkins. — Miss Ethel Tompkins, of San Rafael, has joined Mr. and 
Mrs. James H. Follis at the Tavern at Lake Tahoe. 

Waterhouse. — Mrs. John Waterhouse, of Honolulu, who has been visiting 
her mother, Mrs. Alexander, in Piedmont, for a month, sailed Tuesday 
on the Manchuria for her home in the islands. She was accompanied 
by her daughters, Miss Pattie and Miss Elizabeth Waterhouse. 

Woods. — Miss Elizabeth Woods is spending the season at Del Monte with 
her aunt, Mrs. Henry Schmieden. 



( ( 'ontimced to Page 22) 



There is Satisfaction in dealing* -with 

THE 

Waldorf Hair Store 



BEST KNOWN 



KNOWN AS THE BEST 



241-243 Geary Street 

UNION SQUARE 



You can order just what you want. Get just exactly 
what you order without delay and at the right 
price. You can depend upon us. 

We design and manufacture all kinds of Hair Goods, 
Curls, Puffs, Switches, Waves, Pompadours, 
Fancy Chignons, Ladies' and Men's Wigs of all 
descriptions. Our good work speaks for itself. 
Expert artists in all branches of our work. 

Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp and Facial Treat- 
ments; Hair Dyed and Bleached; Chiropody; Elec- 
trolysis for Removing Superfluous Hair; Mani- 
curing for gentlemen and ladies. 



Go to Headquarters 

BATHING SUITS 

Sweater Coats Summer Underwear 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 




Cor. Grant Ave. and Post Sts. 



Am AMEiaft@<gl HMsanssiona @na Rfa-fflH €@Dfli@rs!hnip) 



CA8EYGRAM8. 

The next Board at t elisors thai should be appointed is 

wan to deodorize the daily /ins*. 

When Reno saw that it could not be famous, it made up 

its mind to be unit, nuns and achieved an immense success. 

The physical inferiority as the whiti raci having been 

decided upon July Ifth, the South proceeded <•* wansi to elevate 
th' naygur. 

The overpowering inactivity av Thaydore linns, nil fills 

the world with alarm. 



"Casey/ 5 said Mrs. Casey, "it rausi be a position av huge re- 
sponsibility to be a Cinspr." 

"Nobodj oughl to know that annj better than von. Mrs. 
Casey," replied her husband, "for you have held down th' job 
iver since the Casey family became incorporated, and ivery in- 
telligeni act I halve committed since then has been the result 
av your Buperhumanly intelligent advice — according I" you." 

"Casey," said -Mrs. Casey, "matrimony is a sort of a play in 
two acts, the first consisting a\ the pursuil and capture, while 
the second involve- the taming and education av a man com- 
mitted to undesirable v. .\ - >e a long period av irresponsible 
bachelor days." 

"I am beginning to wake up t . . the fact that 1 have 1 a 

thoroughly cinsored myself," replied Casey, "and from a quiet 
study av all my friends among th' married niin I can sa\ the 

same for thim. But whin the .Mayer takes ii upon himself to 

appoint a comraitty foi i 'e cinsoring, I am inclined to kick. 

1 am cinsored enough at borne. I arise in the morning, and whin 
1 prepare to depart for my day's work, I find that 1 am the sub- 
ject of cinsorship ovei the way 1 part my hair. Thin whin I 
return heme in the evening, 1 relate the events av the daj and 
am cinsored carefully in relation to thim. And now the area a 
cinsorship is widened bj McCarthy; he tramples on th' liberties 
av th' people who find pleasant entertainment in the nickelo- 
deons, and from now on all th' pictures will be guaranteed by the 

pure F I i 

"Casey," said Mrs. I asey, ""whin the papers nnani si] de- 
pict the immoralities av prize-fighting a- a national past] 

il is bound to go. And j\ the act ai fighting is immoral, the 

pictures av the act a\ fighting are synonymous and th' same." 

"Quite homologous^" said Casey, "and entirely true, but whai 
is sauci ace for the gander, and a^ th' Jeffries- 

Johnson pictures are cinsored as a representation a\ an illegality, 

there are manny other pictures which commonly inhabit e i - 

odeons which will cease lo do so whin the Hoard a\ Cinsors de- 
scinds upon thim." 

"According to th' Chronicle a\ last Tuesday, ' said Mrs. Casey, 
"the Board av Cinsors : - a very deb rmined affair. Four numbers 
of the Board, photographed in the middle av their meditations 
and presented as a threat against Tex Riekard and th' picture 
machines, raise up a bulwark ai di fensc before th' moral- ai 
th' town. At the left hand a\ Hie picture Bits Mrs. !•". M. Mal- 
loy'e, wearing an air a\ great indignation and a pair av eye- 
glasses wit' which she regards th ! question a\ the impropriety 
av fights. linmediateK beside her, and possessed bj a tremnijus 
air av indifference, Miss Edith Hechl is looking the camera 
square in the eye, while alongside a\ AI i - 1- Hecht, entirely un- 
cus that there is anny newspaper photographer annywhere 

close at band, sits J. C. A : redo. |L' Chairman ai the Hoard, ap- 
parently trying to remimber whether it was an upper-cut or a left 
hook that dropped Jeff, and alongside av him sits Norman \V. 
Nail, wearing an expression av great amazement that ann\ pic- 
ture company should desire to bring anny pictures av the fight 
to San Francisco when all the pictures ai the affair bad already 
been lisplayed there by the paper-, which gave more -pan' to the 
presentation av the atrocious immorality than they did to the 
death av King Edward, or than they will to the coronation av 
King Gfeorge." 

"And the enormous tide av opposition that has arisen," said 
Mr. Casey, "is a great surprise to me. For manny week- b. fon 
the fight the papers were filled with nothing else, [verybody 
grabbed the prize-tight pages, and nobody saw aim. iimn im- 
moral about them except Governor Gillett. In order to prove 



that it was a family paper of exceptional moral tone, every 
paper in the town sent out moulder- av public opinion, who write 
books for a living, to Jteno, including wan young lady who was 
instructed to dwell upon the battle from the standpoint av the 
feminine sex. And in order to post their readers properly upon 
the importance av ihe affair, such great authors as John L. Sul- 
livan, Jim Corbett, Bob Fitzsimmons, Professor Bat Nelson, 
and manny others, were imployed regardless av cost. There 
were diagrams printed for educational purposes, showing 
the location av the solar plexus, the point a\ the jaw, and the 
double cross, and whin a brother worker in the art av war, a 
gentleman av color also, met the hope av all United Africa upon 
th' highway that leads from Kick's road house- to Reno, and ad- 
dressed him wit' great scorn and contempt in unprintable lan- 
guage, ivery paper in the cit] reported the conversation fully by 
the use a\ exclamatory dots ami hyphens that intimated but did 
not quite express tb wealth av words and quality av thought im- 
ployed." 

"Casey," said Mrs. Casey, "suppose for instance that th' 
Mayor had appointed a Board av Cinsors to look over the papers 
during thim days av Ireminjus excitement before the Fourth. 
YVhai do yon -uppose would have happened then." 

"My dear woman."' said Mr. Case,, "the American eagle 
would have Bcreamed so loudly thai the whole world would be- 
lieve that Thaydore bad returned wit' his mind made up to be 
i Dictator and was pulling all the feathers out av the eagle's 
tail. But there was no cinsorship av the papers contemplated, 
nor could anny cinsorship have been achieved. It is the custom 
av the world to abide by custom, and in comparison to some 
of the stories printed by the papers, av murders wit' all the de- 
tails given, av divorce and its Hastiness av crime av all descrip- 
tion, the story av the light, the days before the fight and the com- 
plete rehearsal av it in all its deiails i- an inoffensive piece av 
newspaper enterprise that harmed nobody, and didn't do anuy- 
bodv annv g I." 

"But aniiywav." said Mrs. Casey, "I quite agree wit' th' 
Minor. I don't -ee anny necessity f'r presenting tb' light in th' 
moving pictun shows. It ain't going to do anny good to show 
how much bating wan big man can give another, ami in my opin- 
ion there ain't annything very desirable in the picture of a big 
while man crawling upon his hands and knees about a ring, bis 
lace bloody and raw. while a big black man follows him around 
bating him down whinever he gets half-way up again." 

•i think iin-di." said < lasey, "that the need fer such a picture 
ain't quite necessary after all. But the proof a\ the illegality a> 
the picture exists in the pi 'me itself. Winn the Governor an- 
nounced that il wa- lo lie a prize-fight and contrary to law. thim 
people who bad 'be affair in charge immediately declared that it 
nj- purely a boxing contest, and thus a highly educational affair. 
And the wild endeavors that will ensue to bring the pictures 
here is purely for Ihe purpose av proving that it wa- a boxing 
contest and not a fight. The picture people hold thai il was not 

brutal. The Eaci that ihe Prehistoric Monster a\ .lack London 
beat the Primeval Cave Mm av Rex Beach into a bloody pulp, 

was nnr.lv an in. nlen'c! happening av ihe affair, and should not 

in regarded bj anny means. And to prove thi high development 

av mentality lake- plan- whin proper training is indulged in, 
thim critical writers who dwell upon sporting topics fer a living 
call attention to the facl thai there wa- no hatred or viciousness 
in it, that thi naygur hated to hurl the white man, ami while be 
was compelled to pound him to pie,,- . be did it in as humane a 
manner as he could." 

"And I suppose." said M r-. ( 'asev . "that the Cinsor- will put a 

stop io i him pict uvf* no matter » hat happens." 

••Mrs. Casey," said Casey, "the grim determination av Mr-. 
Malloye and the itdin-e disdain av Mi-- llecbl would smother 
thim all alone." 




Enjoy the 
New Book Section 

PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Our rooms are cordially open to visitors. 
239 Grant Ave., between Potft and Sutter Streets 
San Francisco 



.Iri.Y 16, 1010. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



M ftfifl® MlntfeiiB Airem 



THE RAILROADS AND POLITICS. 

VII corporations, railroads, public service corporations and 
private concerns of large interests are widely accused of doing 
politics ;incl reproached roundly therefor. The facl of the matter 

is. thai whatever of politics is done by these c panies is forced 

ii|i(iii them by circumstances. Both State and county are l"'-' 1 ! 
with corporation-baiters, who overlook i pportunity for hold- 
ing in any company thai thej can compel to slum] and deliver. 
Boards of Supervisors, Ootincilinen, Assemblymen and a whole 
raft of other public officials are ever on the alert to graft upon 
any railroad or other large concern that they can victimize. 

As a result, railroads arc forced, as a matter of self-defense, 
in take a hand in polities. I" save themselves from the annoy- 
ance ind extortion of a host of petty politicians. Unless they 
exerted themselves to secure the election of worthy and able men 
thev would be subjected to endless persecution. The railroads 
do not want to mix in politics. They have their own business, 
but they are simply compelled to protect themselves and their 
stockholders from harassment and rapacity. 



.1 CALIFORNIA CONGRESSMAN WHO 

HAS ALWAYS DONE Ills DUTY. 

Representative Julius Kahn never lets the interests of his con- 
stituents and State lack for anything that may benefit them. His 
recent act, in effecting legislation by which I wo more submarine, 
torpedo boats are to be constructed in this city, is directly in 
line with his well established policy of letting the country know, 
as it was long ago taught, that San Francisco can produce just. 
as fine vessels, of any class, as any other locality in the United 




HON. \lll.mx /,. SCHMITT. 
At the election ol November, L908, the bJghe I majority ever 

,<i an AssembU man in San l-'iam i u to I [on. 

ililton L. Sehmitt, Foi twelve years he has practiced Lot in 
i Ins city, ami his experience as a lawyer and ability as a stab 
caused Ins appointment as Chairman on Committee of I ai 
versity. In the latter capacity lie was particularly instrumental 
n securing for the University of California an additional in- 
come of over $'00,000 per year. 

.Mr. Schmitl was born and caised in San Francisco, where be 

has resided ever since. The people of Hie Fortieth District 
which be now represents have prevailed upon him to seek re- 
election, which he has consented to do. He has already received 
the endorsement of the regular Republican Club of the Fortieth 
District. In consideration of his past services and of his ability 
to fill the requirements of this position, he should receive the 
support of every Republican citizen, and be returned to the 
California Legislature. A native son, born in San Francisco, 
graduated from our San Francisco school, graduated from the 
University of California and the Hastings Law School, should 
lie one of the best men we can secure for the position. 



Julius Kiilui. 

Slates. |',,r several . - there lias boon no warship build 
the Union Iron Works, birthplace of such splendid \ • 
battleship Oregon Dew 's flagship Olympm, and others. It is 

1 thai Congressman Kahn'- good work in th- 
but the foivriiniH Dial lead to a I 

the warship building thai made San Fran, isco so n 
pasl years. 



SHORTRIDGE FOR THE SUPERIOR COURT. 

The candidacy of Charles M. Shortridge for the Superior 
Bench of Santa Clara County is one that should be supported 
by every Californian who has the interests of the Stale at heart. 
Mr. Shortridge has long been a public-spirited citizen, and his 
record is clear and clean. Tn every position he has held, either 
public or private, his conduct of office has be'en most creditable. 
In addition, he has been an ardent worker for the interests not 
only of his county but of the whole State. He is the possessor of 
unusually high ability, and his knowledge of the law is ample. 

Our judiciary has often and justly been unfavorably criticised. 
If men like Mr. Shortridge were more numerous upon the bench 
such criticism would be evaded. As Superior Judge he would 
reflect credit upon both himself and the bench. 

Mr. Shortridge : s long and favorable activity in public life in 
San Jose and San Francisco as a publisher and proprietor of 
newspapers will no doubt he sufficient influence to place him in 
the honorable position to which he aspires, but lest we forget, it 
is well that all citizens who have the public welfare at heart take 
an active interest in his campaign and reward him for all the 
good that he has done in the past. 



Miss Harker's School, 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August ISth. 
Catalogue upon application. 



PALO ALTO 
CAL. 



Manzanita Hall 

A home school for boys desiring a thorough prepration for college. Lack 
of rigid classification makes for rapid advancement. Location adjacent to 
Stanford University permits unusual advantages. Ample facilities for all athletic 
sports. Eighteenth year opens August 30th. Send for illustrated catalogue- 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master 



Miss Head's School for Girls 

BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Reopens August 16, 1910 Mary E. Wilson, Principal 



A. W. Beift 






Alice Beft 


Best 


S 


Art 


School 


Life Classes 

Day and Night 


1628 Bush Street 

Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



S@(sM m<& [Persoini&l Uteris 

(Continued from Page 19) 

INTIMATIONS. 

Burns.— Mis. A. M. Burns is the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Louis H. 
L.ong, in Santa Barbara. 

Beaver. — Mis. Frederick Beaver, wno is spending the summer at Inver- 
ness, is entertaining hor niece. Miss Ruth Casey. 

Brewer. — Reverend William A. Brewer and Mrs. Brewer are spending 
the summer months at Castle Crags. 

Beatty. — Oscar Beatty is planning a business trip to Manila and the 
Orient in the fall. Mrs. Beatty will spend a large part of the time 
with her father, John Hooper and Miss Jeanette Hooper at their 
home in this city. 

Castle Crags. — Following is a list of San Franciscans at Castle Crags: Mr. 
ami Mis. Anson Herrick. G. A. Dow and wife, J. W. Morton and wife, 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Wilson Shiels and children, A. VI. Anderson and wii.\ 
G. W. Hendy, Mrs. A. Hendy, C. S. Wheeler, Jr.. Charles Pogue. Jr., 
Mr. and Mrs. Bogart, Mrs. J. A. Snook, W. J. L. Kieruff, wife and 
child, Mrs. M. D. Eaton, Mr. and Mrs. G. It. Fredericks and family, 
Miss W. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Chapman and son, Miss Alma 
Thane, Miss J. Mcpherson, Mr. Bruce Fair, J. W. Sims, Dr. and Mrs. 
J. A, Wiborn. Mrs. W. S. O'Brien, Miss Gertrude O'Brien, G. W. 
Sarlock. J. S. Blair. S\ M. Curley, S. R. James, wife and son. 

Chapman. — Miss Dorothy Chapman, Miss Clara Allen and Miss Mary 
(.iambic have reached Venice on their journey through Europe. 

Drown. — Miss Newell Drown is the guest of Miss Helen Chesebrough at 
Ross. 

Farreli.— Miss Kathleen Farrell's friends will be pleased to learn that all 
danger is past, and that she is now convalescent from a severe attack 
of scarlet fever. 

Green way. — Edward M. Greenway, who spent the Fourth of July in 
Paris, with a party of Callfornians, has left there for Monte Carlo. 
Later he plans to attend an aviation meet in Cairo. 

Hathaway. — Mrs. Wm. D. Hathaway and daughters, Marie and Mabel 
at San Francisco, were the guests of Mrs. H. H. McGowan of Paraiso 
ll'. t Springs. Monterey County. Cal., for the week end. Miss Hatton 
of Monterey accompanied the party. 

Howard. — George H. Howard, Jr., of Burllngame is visiting his grand- 
mother, Mrs. Henry Schmieden, at Del Monte. 

Kelly. — lieutenant and Mrs. Reginald Heber Kelly are at present at Del 
Monte, but will visit Mrs. Kelly's mother, Mrs. Dille, at LIndaholm, 
before departing for Fort Crook, Nebraska. 

Lombard. — Gay Lombard, of Portland, is recovering from the operation 
for appendicitis. 

Mills. — Ogden Mills., Jr., grandson and heir of the late D. O. Mills, 
stopped several days at the Palace on his return from the "scrap" 
at Reno. Mills lost $5,000 on the "late unpleasantness," but refused 
to do much talking about it. 

Monteagle. — Mr. and Mrs. Louis Monteagle wer.e at last accounts en route 
to Paris to meet Kenneth Monteagle on his arrival from America, 

Miller. — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller were at Santa Barbara on their 
motor trip to the resorts South. 

McGavin. — Mrs. Drummond McGavin will come down from Shasta early 
In August with the idea of remaining several months. 

McKlttrick. — Captain and Mrs. William H. McKittrick are visiting Mrs, 
Tevis at Miramar. They were recently guests of honor at a Sinner 
given by Mr. and Mrs. Joel Fithlan. 

Osterhaus. — Mrs. Hugo Osterhaus, of Mare Island, is entertaining Mrs. 
Thorn and the Misses Thorn, of Baltimore, at her navy yard home. 

Paraiso Hot Springs. — A private masquerade was given at Paraiso Hotel 
on July 5th. The affair was very successful, and a hop and supper 
finished the evening. 

Pomeroy. — Miss Christine Fomeroy, who is the guest of Miss Genevieve 
Thompson in Portland, continues to be a much-feted visitor. 

Santa Barbara. — Among those who are enjoying July in Santa Barbara 
are Messrs. William Tevis, William Mayo Newhall, James Robinson, 
Mountford Wilson, William G. Irwin, Frank Deerlng, V. K. Maddox, 
Norris Davis, W. S*. Porter, Mesdames Henry Clarence Breeden, Elea- 
nor Doe, Sarah Stetson Winslow. Seth Mann. Henry Bothin, Henry 
Lund, Jr.; Misses Alexandra Hamilton, Julia Langhorae, Marian New- 
hall, Helene Irwin. Elizabeth Newhall, Lucy Bancroft, Jennie Hooker, 
Eleanor Morgan. Hannah Du Bois, Emily Du Bois, Eleanor Robinson, 
Margaret Doe. 

Stow. — Mr. and Mrs. Vanderlyn Stow and their son, Ashfield, who is a 
student of Harvard, are at present In New York, but will sail for 
Europe the last of this month. 

Tobln. — Mrs. Joseph Oliver Tobin is entertaining Miss Frances Stewart In 
iier home at San Mateo. 

Tillman. — Miss Agnes Tillman returned on Monday to Aptos. after a 
visit to Mill Valley, where she was the guest of Miss Marian Marvin. 

Upham. — Isaac Uphani, who has spent the last five months touring the 
Orient, has sailed from Japan en route to San Francisco. 

Van Ness. — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Van Ness sailed last week for 
Europe. Their visit on the Atlantic Coast covered several weeks, 
and was spent at the Seville in New York, and In Boston, where 
their daughter, Mrs. John Taylor, has her home. 

Wilklns. — Miss Alice Wilkins has been visiting Miss Irene Sabin at Moun- 
tain View. They will spend the coming week-end in Santa Cruz. 

Worden. — Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Worden, accompanied by Mrs, Warden's 
mother, Mrs. A. N. Towne. are at Lake Tahoe. 



"Have you your expense accounl ?" asked the junior mem- 
ber of the firm. "No/* answered the commercial traveler. "My 
expense account is in my new overcoat." "That relieves my 
mind. My partner was trying to figure whether your new over- 
feoai wasn't somewhere in your expense account." — Washington 
Star. 



TAKE A 

VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

TO THE COUNTRY WITH YOU 
VICTORS from $10 to $100 on the Easiest Terms 

From our 100,000 Records you and your friends can be 
entertained at a moment's notice by foremost bands, the 
greatest opera artists, funny comedians, sweet singers, and 
all kinds of clever people — take along all the latest song hits 

Sherman Kay & Go. 

Steinway iad Other Pianos. 

Player Pianos of All Grades Victor Talking; Machine! 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS. OAKLAND 



For Dandruff and all Scalp Diseases 
HI A. F. COSGROVE 

SPECIALIST 

Diseases of the Hair and Scalp, at 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

239 POWELL STREET 




H. BETTE 



Ladies Tailor 



and 



Habit Maker 



IMPORTER OF FINE NOVELTIES 

Fall Importations and styles just received. 
270 SUTTER STREET Opposite White House 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Flags, Tents and Canoes 

CAMP FURNITURE and GARDEN HOSE 

If you want Quality and Lowest Prices, call at 

WEEKS-HOWE EMERSON CO. 

51 Market Street San Francisco 



Jcly 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



MONTH OF SPORTS WILL OPEN AT DEL MONTE 
AUGUST 19TH. 

The official announcement of the dates for the annual month 
of sports at Hotel Del Monte has just been issued. This year's 
games will open on August 19th, with the Del Monte Golf Tour- 
nament, which will continue until (he 26th. The tenth an I 

competition for the Men's Amateur Championship of the Pacific 
Coast Golf Association will be held from August 27th to August 
31st inclusive. The men's open championship of the Pacific 
Coast will be played off on August 28th. The Pacific Coast Golf 
Association is composed of the golf clubs at Los Angeles, Ked- 
lands, Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara, San Kianrism, Oak- 
land, Sacramento, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle, Spokane, Vic- 
toria and Vancouver. Each of these clubs send a team to com- 
pete for the honors. Del Monte links are the scene of the play 
because they are strictly neutral ground. The Men's Open 
Championship, for the Pacific Coast, is open to all players, and 
the winner holds the championship cup for the following year. 



The San Francisco Materialists' Association, whose lec- 
tures at the Auditorium are becoming popular, make the follow- 
ing announcement: "Aims and Morals of Life: A Religion of 
Impulse," subject of lecture by Dr. Rudolph H. Gerber this Fri- 
day. "Anthony and Cleopatra,'' subject of lecture by Professor 
Frederick Ii. Koch, of the University of North Dakota, next 
Friday, July 22d. Prof. Koch states that his topic is an inter- 
pretation all his own "new light," and not printed in any of the 
critics' books. The music for these meetings will be furnished 
by Mr. Mast Wolfson, Mrs. Amy Waters Deane, and Mr. H. B. 
Pasmore, 'cello, vocal and piano. 



Just now the men who are out in Los Angeles are trying 

to figure whether it is better to work ten hours at $3.75 a day 
and all the time, or to work $1.00 a day and about half the time. 
The open shop foundries and machine shops in Los Angeles are 
running full blast with. 75 per cent, of the men at work! 



Notice is hereby given that an Action of Multiplepoindlng Is at present 

■t sometime Publican Randolph Street Dunfermline thei 
Clerk In the Procurator- Kis, ,, is -e thin- i now Clerk In the I 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . Savings Bank, Andrew Wardlaw, Painter, Dunfei 

Hepburn bo time Headmaster Mllesmark Public school 

\liw Headmaster Queen Prnne Public Si hool there 
acting under the Trust Disposition una Settlement dated 
St-cond March 1887 and registered In the Books of Council and S 

Mi September L900 granted t»y James Alston Merchant who resided In 
i 'iimuir Street i lunfermline 

PURSUERS mi,] i:i;ai, RAISERS against James El ntlj be 

lieved to be in the United States of America but whose address is to 
the Pursuers unknown, tin- Representatives of the deceased David Rom 
who died unmarried about Twentj years ago In the Royal Edinburgh 

Vsylum for Hi,' l iisn r i . Mi ,rn oigslde Edinburgh, Dolllna Hops at: i sent 

an inmate >,i the Lunatic Asylum at Bangour, Jessie Ross who prese it 

address is to tin- Pursuers unknown ana Catherine Ross at one ti re 

siding at Dundonald stint Edinburgh but whose present address is t,, the 
Pursuers unknown tin- parties named being all children of Mrs. Mat , 
i;,,ss witv of Donald Ross sometime Blacksmith in Edinburgh and sister 
of ih, wife of the said James Alston and so far as known to the pursuers 
ih, whole of the children of the said Mrs Margaret Ross liKKKNbKltS 
for distribution of a sum of £400 being a legacy left by the said deceased 
James Alston to the children of the said Mrs Margaret Ross and the issue 
of such of them as might have predeceased in which action of Multiple- 
poindlng the Lord Ordinary (Skerrington) on 19th May 11)10 pronoiu I 

an Order and on 4th June 1910 a further Order appointing all parties 

claiming an interest in the fund to lodge their claims and on 18th I 

1910 pronounce an Interlocutor in the following terms: — 

18th June 1910 Lord Skerrington Act A. A. Fraser Alt Kemp. The Lord 
Ordinary having heard Counsel appoints the Pursuers and Real Raisers 
to lodge a Condescendence of the Fund in medio within ten days and ap- 
points the dependence of the Action to he advertised once in each of tie- 
New York Herald and the San Francisco Newsletter Newspapers. 



"W. CAMPBELL." 



Of all which intimation is hereby given. 



25th June 11110. 



GALBRAITH-STEWART & REID. 

S. S. C. 
76 Queen Street Edinburgh. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of Fabian Toplitz, Deceased. 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned executors of the last will 
of FABIAN TOPLITZ, Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons hav- 
ing claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them witli the necessary 
vouchers within ten months after the first publication of this notice to 
the said executors, at the office of Henry G. W. Dinkelspiel, Rooms 800 to 
806 Claus Spreckels Building, San Francisco, California, which said office 
the undersigned selects as their place of business in all matters con- 
nected with said estate of Fabian Toplitz, Deceased. 

MONROE F. TOPLITZ 
MELVILLE S. TOPLITZ 
MARCUS BANNER 
Executors of the last will of Fabian Toplitz, Deceased. 
I i.ated, San Francisco, July 12. 1910. 



What Euclid Avenue is to Cleveland — 
What Central Park West is to New York™ 
What the Lake Shore is to Chicago — 

That — and more! 

The CROCKER TRACT is to the Bay Cities 



Villa Sites— 

On Piedmont's oak-clad hills — 

For homes coding $15,000 to $50,000- 

Served by electric trains— 

Already adorned by many mansions of distinction 

and costliness - 
Curving boulevards- 
Palms, flowers, trees and flowering shrubs— 



AND a view of hills, bay and distant city 
and ocean that is untouched in the 
world. 
Our motor cars are constantly on call to 
show interested persons, and particularly 
visitors from the East, over this beautiful 
estate dotted with stately homes embowered 
in perennial bloom. 



WICRHAM HAVENS, INCORPORATED 

entire top floor Oakland Bank of Savings Building 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 




A Recommended 
Oil Pboposition. 



A report made by Mining Engineer 
\ . B. Alien to liiu President of the 
Pajaro Valley Oil Companyj undei 
recent date, shows conclusively i li.n 
the properties of that company arc of exceptional value. Mr. 
Allen decidedly favors development, ami. after describing ai 

length the formation ><( the soil, the locati >f the propi 

.m.l so on, says: 
•■In my investigations, 1 found a number of exposures showing 

coarse and incoherent sands heavily impregnated with il lot 

nl' petroleum, ami in one instance, at stated, a distillation Er 

the Bands returned a small quantity of light nil of excellent qual- 
ity. These exposures all occur at about the same elevation (ane- 
roid), and show imbedded sandstone with incoherent sands and 
line -ravel, and in places sandstone containing concretions of 
iron. Springs of sulphurous water Located aK.ne a soft blue 
-and which gives off a strong smell of petroleum and at a point 

a short distance northwest el' this property in the sai ange, 

fossil -hells (miocene) imbedded in sandstones are found in pro- 
fusion, in tracing the chief canyon or ravine drainages, I no- 
ticed pieces of detached marl ami calcareous formations that 
have evidently washed down i'mm above, and also the general 
sedimentary character of the materia] thai goes t" make up the 

wash. 

"At the time of my visit, the test well known as the 'gas 1 well 
was partially unwatered, and a flow el gas with sufficient EoFce 

to unite was shown. 

-Si bag up, I found the general conditions favorable for 

the location of petroleum. Facilities for operating are good,' 
roadways leading from Watsonville to the propertj in good con- 
dition and easy of access. In fact, all physical conditions good. 
Development is warranted." 



Perhaps the next greatest opportu- 
Oil Land Acreage. nity for making money other than 

holding stock in a great gusher, is 
in acquiring control of oil lands. The formation of the earth's 
surface gives indication of oil; therefore a company making a 
special business of controlling large quantities of this land for 
speculative purposes, will probably produce a new crop of niil- 
lionaires in California. Eighteen months ago one "f the hot- 
know ii oil engineers of the State secured control of live hundred 
acres of this land in San Luis Obispo ami Monterej Counties on 
exceptionally good terms — it is considered to he tin. Inst in the 
whole Monterey field. Gas is coining from the ground, and water 
springs in many places, indicate the sources of oil s :m ds U 

With the view of operating along the lines of acquiring acre- 
age .nid making the large profits accruing from ihi> source in 
the undeveloped sections of California oil fields, the Panama 

Pacific Oil Company has been organized. The company will 
deal almost exclusively in land and Leases; thai is. the acquire- 
ment of same on terms and conditions thai will give its holdings 
a tremendous speculative! value. Under the plans oi operation, 
this company has a chance to multiptj the profii of investments 
far in excess of those who do 'he actual drilling. The e 

quired to secure 3] lative holdings is comparatively small. 

The Panama Pacific oil Company will make a business of 

leasing I heir lands to companies that will drill lei oil and prove 
the raiue of the property. Stock is being sold for tin , 
of acquiring still greater acreage. The possibilities of this com- 
pany are unlimited. 



The value of the Big Panoche Oil Company's properties 

in San Benito County may he better appreciated when it is 
known that they are close to the famous New tndria o 
which employ hundreds of men steadily and require large quan- 
tities of fuel. The San Indria people are linding it a hard 
thing to get firewood at $6 a cord, ami now they can gel from 
the Big I'anoehe ,ii ;1 1 $2.65 a barrel in preference to wood at $ii 
a cord, il being estimated thai three and four-tenths barrels of 



oil are the fuel equai of one and one-half cords of wood. There 
is big profit in oil at 60 cents a barrel, so the profits to be made 

by Big Panoche from this source alone can readily be underst I. 

The geologic formation of the Big Panoche properties is sand- 
stone, intermingled with conglomerates and shales of a blackish- 
blue color. These materials smell strongly of petroleum, which 
oozes out in many places in the ravines on the properties. 



The completion of the great bridge, 2,000 feet long, across 

the Suchitoto river, from Maviscal, Mexico, to Ayutla, Guate- 
mala, i- a notable step in the progress of the Pan-American 
Railroad, that pet project of the late E. H. Harriman. This 
route, as has been announced, will he from the United Stales. 
through Central America, across Panama, and thence through 
South America, over the Andes, to Buenos Ayres. The immen- 
the Held that tiiis greai road will open up nearly staggers 
the imagination. The engineering difficulties, while great, a,-,, 
not. so formidable as many that have been overcome in North 
America and Africa. It is undoubted that not only mineral 
laii agricultural wealth of enormous value will he developed by 
this road, uoi-k upon which is Bteadily progressing. 



California oil stocks continue to attract wise investors, 

who fully appreciate the importance' of this industry. 1: has 
been demonstrated t hat there is more money in oil than in gold, 
and that people are making fortunes almost daily in the urea; 
oil fields of this State. Tic demand for fuel oil is increasing 

at such a rapid rate that the output of every wall in California 
is practically assured of a good and ready market. Several big 
gushers have been reported lately in the southern and middle 
part of the State. Dealings in oil stocks on the local exchange 
have been active durins the past week. 



The need for salt water cisterns as a reserve supply in 

case pf conflagration is manifest to all. A peculiarly desirable 
place for the installation oi 3UCh a - ■<• CO is Alameda, where all 

ilie natural c litions exist for the establishment of a cistern 

system at relatively low cost. Being situated on low land, and 



Privtte Wire-New York. Cbiclgo 



Western Union Code 



J. C. WILSON 



Member j Chicago Board of Trade 

' The Stock and Bond Exchange. S. F. 



Maio Office 
MILLS BUILDING 
San Francisco 

Correspondents 

HARRIS. WINTHROP & CO. 

New York. Chicago, London and Paris 



Branch Offices 

PALACE HOTEL 

(Main Corridor) San Francisco 

HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles. Cal. 



MORE THAN 



5% 



The increased cost of living has made it necessary for 
the investor to seek a larger return on his money 
To meet this demand we have a carefully prepared 
list of bonds yielding a high rate and affording perfect 

SAFETY OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST 

Write for our Circular 

SUTRO & CO., 412 Montgomery St, Saa Francisco 



THE OIL BOOK An Authority on California Oil 

A Weekly Publication Devoted to the Oil Industry 
Mailed free upon request. 

LINCOLN MORTGAGE AND LOAN COMPANY 

14th and 15th Floors 166 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
New York Seattle Los Angeles 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal. 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



.Iri.v 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



■ ■ :•. surrounded by water, Alameda offers idea] condition 
this purpose, and, by sinking the cisterns low enough, the sal 

iter i an be made to flow eatsilj into them al e< i watei . 

thus affording ready and cheap means of replenishing il upp] 

after a drain upon it. 

The depression of the Wall streel stock market, which was 

a characteristic of Last week, has been s ewhal overcome, fol- 
lowing the discovery that this year's wheat crop will probably ex- 
peed that of last year by over 400,000,000 bushels, notwithstan I- 
ing the heavy losses in spring wheat. An abundant yield of corn 
is announced for the year, also. Such news lias had a steadying 
effect on the market, and recoveries have set in. 



The Plumbers' Union of Chicago is "considering" erect- 
ing a home for disabled plumbers. The suggestion is made to 
(he San Francisco autocrats of the Boldering iron thai some sorl 
pf provision be made for the two hundred helpers Eorced out of 

work permanently by the alliance between the master plumbers 
and the Plumbers' Union. Are not the helpers men and 
"brothers," or is the fact that profits are increased and a cinch 
Obtained on all jobs by those that control the unions to be taken 
into consideration when two hundred men are starving? 



WHISTLING THROUGH THEIR FINGERS. 

The Labor Trust, as represented by the Labor Council of San 
jFrancisco, is whistling through its fingers to keep up its courage. 
In the brewers' strike in Los Angeles it lias lost out. In the 
metal trades strike in Portland and in Los Angeles it is losing 
out. The unionists who are out of work are looking askance at 
the idea of a camp of reconcentrados in the Angel City, as that 
means that all strike funds will be handled by the San Francisco 
bunch of agitators. Thus the San Francisco leaders catch the. 
lough coming and going, and the Los Angeles outfit doesn't even 
get a look-in.. Most of the mechanics of Los Angeles, under the 
prosperous open-shop conditions, have their own homes, and they 
do not look with favor on the idea of leaving these for a camp 
subsidized and commissaried by the San Francisco undesirables, 
How long will they stand for the rampant unionists in the South 
is hard to tell, hut that they are murmuring is true, and some 
brave soul may soon lead the way hack to work, and in thai ease 
the three thousand who are out will sunn follow. All il takes is 
a leader with a mind of his own to take the stand against the 
strike monkey work of the San Francisco expert second-story 
men. 



FAIRMONT HOTEL WILL OPERATE ON BOTE 

AMERICAN I W El ROPEAN PLANS. 

\ol content with giving to San Francisco two of the mosl 
magnificent hotels in the world operated on the European plan, 
the Palace Hotel Company i step further, and no 

bounces thai en and after September firsl that it will operate 
an American plan as well as the European plan dining room at 
ih,. Fairmont Eotel. For » • era! pears before the lire the Palace 
Hotel maintained both the tobl ami ./ hi carte dining 

rooms. Since that time, however, the European p 
been in force, and San Fram isco lie- been without a really first- 
class American plan bouse. Thai a hotel operated on the tabh 
d'hote plan was ivalK needed, however, has been proved to the 
management of the Fairmont by the numb or this 

service h\ both local ami also bj the travelers who 

assemble at thai I articu- 

tronj with the travelers from the Orient and the I- 

where the table d'hote plan is universallj accepted. As the Fa r- 

mont caters almost entirely to this, the highest class ol travel. 

Such a demand could net he ignored, and the present announce- 
ment is the result. 



Debs, the man who plunged tl 

ml near-anarcln bodm rears hack i- new spend' 
time writing epigrams, II latest : "Monej 

for tee much, characti little." This is ample pi 

the fad iliat Mr. Debs must he many times a millionaire, as 
char- 




Just Try It On 

STEAKS 

and you will be delighted with 
the added zest given by 

LEA&PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

It improves Soups, Fish, Gravies, 

Chafing Dish Cooking, Welsh 

Rarebits and many 

other dishes. 

Beware of Imitations* 

John Duncan's Sons, Agts., N. Y. 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



Plan to spend your vacation in 
California's Wonderland 



GOOD HOTELS-BOARDING CAMPS- 
PRIVATE CAMPING- 

Your choice at reasonable rates. 



Conditions are ideal for Rest and Recreation — 

Daily outings to points of interest 
Jolly times around the evening camp-fire. 
The best of society; congenial companions. 
ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER. ANY 
Southern Pacific or Santa Fe ticket agent, or 
O.W. LEHMER, TRAFFIC MANAGER, Y. V. R. R, Merced, Cal. 




Wedding Presents.— The choicest Tariety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately. 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D.. D. D. &., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlue, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 40S 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Marks'. 

ATTORN EY8-AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. 8hortrtdge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
clsco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 

Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rtegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 

of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 

Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 

205-206 Westbank Building. H30 Market street. San Francisco. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Polea, Shingles, Split Shakes. Etc. 
Main Office — Crocker Bide.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Ssctee sis t A. Zderssc* « Seas 
Zsllerbach Building. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Strssts 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



GLIDDEN TOUR 

Again Conspicuously Shows 

Diamond 

TIRES 



ARE THE BEST 

Drivers Tell Why They Won Tour 

On mileage cost — wear resistance — absence of defect — freedom from blowouts and notable superior capacity to resist 
shocks, the most nearly complete record shows: 

14 Cars used strictly stock Diamond Tires. 
24 Cars divided among six other makes. 

4 blowouts on Diamond Tires. 

12 blowouts on largest competing makes. 
8 blowouts on other competing makes. 

13 Diamond Tires replaced account of cuts. 

15 largest competing make of tire replaced account of cuts. 
55 Diamond Tires punctured. 

63 largest competing make punctured, 
2 Cars changed to Diamond Tires en route. 

WITH TRUTH AND ACCURACY, no one can give complete statement of tires, results and mileage cost during 
latter part of tour, as it is well known only a few cars even approximated schedule at all times. Cars were often 
one to three days behind and tire observers were utterly unable to gather complete data. ANY FIGURES 
presented as complete are, therefore, juggled and misleading. 

Regarding Results— Drivers Say: 



"Diamond record this tour is grand evldenci oJ theli excellence." 

—Ralph RobitalUe (Chalmers Pilot Cai I 

"Carried seven passengers from start to finish of tour. Original 
tires still on and In dandy condition." — Rudolph Paana < Halliday 
Press Car.) 

"Greatly appreciate tire serviee In tour. Only trouble had was 
punctures." — Charles Ballinger (Premier No. 2.) 

"On heaviest loaded car in tour Diamond Tires gave good 
vice. Original air in one tire." — J. .1. Caffrey (Columbia Pace- 
maker.) 

"No others could have given me the service obtained, with Dia- 
monds. Only changes due to punctures." — Fred Castle (Glide Car. 
No. 10.) 

"Including sixty-four hour continuous drive, In which I did not 
touch tires. Diamonds gave fine service throughout tour." — O. F. 
Van Sicklen (Falcar No. 6). 

"Congratulate the Diamond Rubber Co. on splendid results the 
tires gave me." — C. C. Bavington (Westcott No. 111.) 



"Finished tour with original air in two Diamond Tires. Only 
. tiangea were due to severe cuts." — W. Donnely (Cino No. 15.) 

"Only tire chai.ges I made were due to cuts." — J. R. Ande (Chal- 
mers Confetti Car.) 

"Did not believe any tire made could withstand such usage as 
necessarily put upon mv Diamond equipment." — George NeflC 
(Parry No. 106.) 

"Very satisfactory results throughout on Diamond Tires In tour." 

-A ].. Martin (Cole No. 104.) 

"Your soleetlon of Diamond Tires as the best was more than 
justified by Glldden tour results." — John Glover (Westcott Press 
Car.) 

"Wry excellent service given me by Diamond Tires throughout 
the tour. Punctures caused the only changes." — L. M. Dull (Parry 
X... 9.) 

"Most remarkable service on worst roads ever traveled by an 
auto was the Diamond tire record on the tour." — Parry Knleht 
(Cole No. 6.) 



Come in and See the New Diamond Quick Detachable Demountable Rim 
You'll Want Them on Your Car 



The Diamond Rubber Company 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOS ANGELES 
C E. MATHEWSON, Pacific Coast Manager 



SEATTLE 



July 10, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




owmii 



By L. J. Pinkson. 

Xrw automobile owners of .San Francisco and vicinity for 
July 6th to July 9th inclusive: 

July 6th— 

TURNER, M. H., 571 El Dorado St Oakland Touring 

HOLMES, R. D„ 367 E. 14th St., Oakland Mora 

CUNNINGHAM, J. R„ 3011 E. 14th St.. Oakland Maxwell 

WALLACE. J. H., S. E. cor. Washington and Sansome Sts Chalmers 

HAMELIN, W„ 827 Machison St., Oakland Mitchell 

WEBSTER, W. J., Chronicle Building. S. F Kisselkar 

BRYANT. B. S., 2527 S. Park St., San Francisco Overland 

POWELL, ALVIN, DR., 921 Myrtle St., Oakland Franklin 

SCHILLING, A., 1403 Jackson St., Oakland Oakland 

MAXFIELD, H. M., Perry and Vernon Sis., Oakland Olds 

July 7th— 

VIOSCA, J.. 2117 California St., San Francisco Sunset 

HORNBROOK, C. P., 683 3Sth St., Oakland Lambert 

liEMOULIN, MK,S. E. A., 2265 California St., San Francisco White 

MOLONY, J. J., 907 Valencia St., San Francisco Ford 

BOOTH. F. E., 91 Drumm St., San Francisco Lozier 

July 8th— 

SWEENEY, J. P., 14 Montgomery St., San Francisco Buick 

LYON, G. F., Burlingame Buick 

MORTON, MRS. J. H., 120 Commonwealth Ave., S. F Locomobile 

WHITE. W. H„ 212 Pacific Building, San Francisco Truck 

COXHEAD, R. S., 175 Fremont St., San Francisco Mitchell 

FOSTER, MRS. A. G.. 1717 Market St., Oakland Chalmers 

July 9th— 

UNITED IRON WORKS, 2d and Jefferson Sts., Oakland White 

PA VERT, R., 2001 Crosby Ave., Oakland Overland 

THE PACIFIC TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO.. Oakland E-M-F. 

BRODERICK, W. F., Dimond P. O., Fruitvale Brush 

PETERSON, C. A. . Redwood City Overland 

BOND, FRANCIS, 508 Gough St., San Francisco Pierce-Arrow 

GRIFFITH, S. N.. 220 Central Bank Building. Oakland Winton 

CROCKER NATIONAL BANK, San Francisco Stearns 

* * * 

The triumph of the automobile in the genera] commerce of 
the country, its elevation to the liflh in rank of the American 
industries, its solving the problem of congestion in the leading 
cities of flic United Slates, its cduralional features and its 
adding new hours to business men's rest, have al various times 
of late been gone into by the motor car enthusiast, bui the most 
comprehensive digest of what the automobile has accomplished 
was recently read at a gathering of the leading manufacturers 
and dealers of the country held in the East. The writer was 
defending the automobile againsl a certain coterie of critics 
who have recently termed the motor car a menace to the coun- 
try. The review is a careful analysis of the achievements thai 
has proven the automobile to be the invention of the age, and is 
worthy of reproduction not only to enlighten the enemies to th 
motor car. Inn to educate the enthusiast as to what part the auto 
plays in the business of the country. The review follows: 

"The outcrj against the automobile lately voiced by > 
financiers and educator? of national prominence, relative to the 
ureal and 111. leasing popularity of the motor car. is the loan 
old erj against progress. Thai the world need.. I this improved 

system of quid ransportation, as wel eady for it. 

has been proven by the im and well-nigh unive - 

aponse to and approval of it. Unman ingenuity has alw 
plied itself to inventions thai would Bave time, expedite pi 
tighten human labor, and contribute alike to human happiness 
and usefulness. As the telephone, by it? virtual annihilation of 
time and distance, has in many BUbstanti 

hours of every da] for the posaibiJ ti - oi practical achievement, 
saying nothing of its equal gifts in contribution to human eom- 
fbe automobi tie and 

even the certain chances for even man who can employ this 
new agencj nearly to double, in very many instances, hit 
profits, and for cities and communities to make progres- 
before possible. 

" The automobile has helped concn iroblem 

of congestion in cities and to make feasible better and . 
residences in the country. In the serious menace of lie 

of the surprising and undesirable growth i nlal 

ion, the automobile is greatly help 



settle a most important question. F.u from being against the 
public welfare, if bas in ever} respect invigorated and insured 
public prosperity. It has added new hours of opportunity to 
every business man's day, contributed to the enjoyment and 
happiness of his family, and '.\ the creation of a greal new in- 
dustry, furnished fresh employment to hundreds of thousands 
of workingmen and many thousands of businessmen, instead 
of encouraging extravagance among those who are not wealthy, 
it has more often taught those who have not the money to buy 
machines to economize and save to that end. We bear no out- 
cry from the illustrious antagonists of the motor car directed 
against the expenditure of millions of dollars annually for un- 
necessary clothes, for tobacco, for intoxicating liquors and for 
other human habits. It is obvious that here there is much room 
for the exercise of relative economy. 

"Why should the rich critics deny to those who are not rich 
the privilege of gaining the means by which they, too, may be 
able, by comparative economy at the most, to enjoy this most re- 
markable invention for both human need and human comfort? 
The popular faith in the stories of so many homes being mort- 
gaged to buy automobiles rest more largely, if not entirely, on 
false assumption — an assumption which has doubtless been cre- 
ated and fostered in a large measure by banking and deposit com- 
panies, which naturally believe that the most patriotic and wise 
money is that which is kept on deposit, either without interest 
or at a rate very low. This is not an intelligent time to sneer 
at the thrift or wisdom of the American family, and especially 
not a time in this general era of prosperity to impugn the sense 
of a large number of typical American families who have found 
in the automobile a chance to widen and simplify their lives and 
increase their daily pleasure. 

"The world moves, human society moves with it. And one 
of the finer and saner American ambitions is to stimulate each 
family in the land to procure for itself a fuller, higher, more 
enjoyable and at the same time more useful life. One just criti- 
cism of our people as a whole has been that the average family 
does not aspire to obtain for itself an existence holding more of 
rational and healthful pleasure. 

"So with the automobile industry, risen to fifth in rank in 
the line of American commerce, and paying hundreds of millions 
of dollars for the manufacture of machines — in the last analysis 
90 per cent of this going to the pay of labor. Why should col- 
lege and railroad presidents and hankers and other self-consti- 
tuted and perhaps not too well informed critics be unhappy over 
the inevitable action of many thousands of American families 
in finding through this great invention a legitimate opening for 
larger living? 

"Modern civilization differs Erora thai of former periods chiefly 
by reason of swifter travel and communication. These have 
changed history and made the character alike of nations and of 
individuals radically distinct from whal they would have other- 
wise been. 

"From prehistoric times, the era of eliminating the horse and 
the donkey as hauling powers look possession of imaginative 

minds. The SI ' lie was a recurring dream, which al 

various times found more or less definite expression OH paper. 
though not in fact. 

"The automobile is simply a manifestation of the foe 
.volution that are working out the world's need, and its appear- 
ance in this sense is no more remarkable than Was I in advent of 

discoveries in oth tnents of civilization. Th 

mercial phases of the automobile are practically unlimited. The 
world wants labor-saving devices. The auton one. 

"From the first, the automobile las been the butt of prejudice 
and doubt. No important invention of modern times hi 
a more bitterlv presented antagonism to overcome. The indus- 
try founded on an irresistible demand was not, however, to be 
destroyed by the unthinking skepticism of men. 

"It is quite safe to say that nothing has done so much b 
ate the man on the street on mechanical matters to anything 
like the extent for which the automobile is responsible. Further, 
it has done more to arouse enthusiastic interest in a desire for 
information on technical matters on the part of the average lay- 
man than have the combined inventive results of a quarter of a 
century of the most marvelous progress the world has seen. Who 
is sroiiig to measure the benefit of this with a yard stick? 

•|1:, man who now motors from bis home to bis 

office in town arrives with fresh and alert and I 

'lie day's work. In the evening, instead of, as 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



under the olil enforced custom of reaching home jaded and tired 
after a jerky rail or street car journey, he enjoys a motor run 
which lias recuperated hie energies, and Ends himself 61 for 
what the evening may bring. The motor car's beneficial In- 
fluence is in many other respects far reaching. One inn point in 
particular to the growing tendencj among town-folk to seek the 
country during week-ends, and the health-giving pastimes of 
rural fife rather than the enervating routine pleasures of (own. 
A wave of craving for simple outdoor pursuits is passing over the 
country in growing strength, and it is not difficult to trace the 
impetus to the motor car. This is nol a trivia] fact, but a greal 
economic fact. Witness alone thi evolution of the Country Club, 
one of the few mediums of our modern complex life giving a 
maximum of desirable and normal social intercourse at reason- 
able expenditure. 

"There is no question that a change has overtaken the emu, 

country as a result of the econ ical, reliable motor car. So 

much for that. And don'1 forget thai from the presence of the 
automobile each year there are spent, aside from the capital and 
men directly employed, hundreds of millions of dollars, everj 
farmer, hotel-keeper or industrial worker in the nation receiving 
his portion of xpenditure [or the use of hundreds ol thousands 
of motor cars now running in the United States. The lesson 
reads itself." 

* * * 

That this coming season is I" see all records for automobile 
-ales smashed, ami that a greatei volume of business i- to be 
done than in any previous year, is the statemeni of II. 0. Harri- 
son, representative for Peerless and Everitt cars. The well known 
autoist who has an opportunity Eew have to judge the progress 
of the industry declares we are i utcring one of the greatesl years 
m the bistorj of the industry. 

At a time when there is a chance to observe the trend of the 
trade between the two seasons, when every dealer and many 
prospective buyers are waiting the arrival of the 191] g Is, Har- 
rison sounds a note of optimism. He has seen the Peerless pro- 
duct for the coming year. He knows the lines of the high-grade 
palace car, and he also knows just what the Everitt <is to look 
like. Only a lew have bad a chance lo see the new Peerless, bul 



the line of the coming year, Harrison says, is bound to be more 
popular than ever before. 

There is no reason To fear an overproduction, Harrison says. 
More automobiles than ever are lo he sold because the resources 
of the trade have never been reached, according to Harrison. 
who points out there are vast areas of the West into which the au- 
tomobile dealer lias not yet entered. This means increased trade 
and more cars. 

* * * 

Piedmont, C'al.. has ordered, a motor driven 35-fool truck, on 
wbieh is carried all the hook and ladder apparatus, chemical ex- 
tinguishers and other paraphernalia necessary lor lire-lighting. 
The new truck is driven by a six-cylinder motor, which develops 
80 horse-power. Completely equipped. Die big machine will 

weigh l?,ooo | ids. it is now being buill by an Eastern firm 

at a cost ol' $7,000. A complete Gamewell tire alarm system is 
also being installed. 

* * * 

Mr. W. d. Websier, of the Duponl Powder Company, dur- 
ing the pasl week purchased a :;o h. p. Kline 'touring Car from 

the Frank O. Renstrom C panv. Immediate delivery was 

made. The Renstrom Company also sold a Kline toy tonneau to 
Dr. (i. M. Barretl of this city. Delivery will lie made shortly. 



CLIMBING 

UP A 2\% GRADE ON SUNSET HILL AT OSSINING, N. Y. 



THE 




CAR 



owned by Mrs. Cuneo and driven by Louis Disbrow BROKE ALL FORMER 
RECORDS and easily WON the big event of the day, 

Although the former record was made by the fast. Stanley steamer, 
it had to go before the Knox idea of a rugged, reliable automobile. 

Design, material and workmanship are the three big fadlors that 
musT: be RIGHT to secure an efficient car. 

Combined with these the Knox Company weave eleven years' 
active experience into the details of their producft. 

Sold in San Francisco by 

RELIANCE AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 

342 VAN NESS AVENUE 



.Iii.y Itl. L910. 



and California Advertiser 



2!) 



A trip but recently completed is i lie i - dis 

rn North Carolina by II. D. Honeycutt, of Concord, with 
a Hupmobile, is the chief topii ol conversation among the motor 
car enthusiasts of thai section of the country. 

According to advices jusl received by 8. G. Chapman, this 
trip was made over roads, many of which had previously been 
on dered impossible Eor automobiles. The Btar performance was 
the climbing of a peak known as Blowing Rock. This peai 
reaches an altitude oi 1,500 Feet, which lifts it well above the sur- 
rounding mountains. The only available road is exceedingly 
steep, ami has baffled repeated efforts of gasoline cars of everj 
known power to climb it. The Hupmobile. however, topped the 
peak. The only other ear that ever reached the summit was a 

steamer. 

* * * 

The Chanslor & Lyon Company also have a similar permanenl 
trophy that is offered by the San Francisco-Monterey run. Now 
that the roads are well repaired and the weather ideal, it is ex- 
I Hi t i'il that a number of local ears will soon be after this record. 

\V. G. Chanslor, President of the Chanslor & Lyon Mojtor 
Supply Company, passed through town recently. On his way 
up from Los Angeles he stopped at Fresno, and looked over the 
new Chanslor & Lyon branch, recently established in the Raisin 
City. He repor'.s himself well pleased with the business that 
it is doing. This Fresno branch is a. distributing center for the 
interior section of the State, and is already handling a tremen- 
dous trade. 

* * * 

J. H. Shields, sales manager for the H. E. Wilcox Motor Car 
Co., builders of the Wilcox trucks, is in town spending a few 
days with the Pioneer Automobile Company. This is Mr. Shields' 
first visit to the Coast since 1904, and he expresses himself as 
greatly impressed by the tremendous strides that have been taken 
here since then in the motor car business. Before returning to 
the factory, Mr. Shields will tour the entire Coast. 



SOME people have TIRE TROUBLE, others buy and use the 
LITTLE WONDER VULCANIZER having detachable moulds which fit 
the size of their tires and is guaranteed to do perfect work, heated by 
electricity. Alcohol or Acetelene Gas taken from tank or generator. 
Price of iron Viilcanizer, nicely nickel-plated $6.00, price of solid alumi- 
num Vulcanizer $7.00. 




S| 




f±i 1 . „T^. . ,jj 




PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 

DISTRIBUTORS 
50 VAN NESS AVE., SAN FRANCISCO 





Have your automobile work done by a Reliable Firm. Cars 
wired for electric lights. All work guaranteed. No "overcharge" in 
this establishment. 

INDEPENDENT GARAGE 

BRANCH OF 

INDEPENDENT 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

Directors— S.H.Horne. President; F.W.Dohrmann,Jr.,Vice-Pres.; 

J. M. Carlson. Sec'y andTreas.; C. M. Fickert, Dr. Kaspar Pischel. 

381 FULTON ST., San Francisco. Cal. S. H. HORNE. Manager 

Phone Market 2196 



Word just received by S. (1. Chapman from Baltimore, Md., 
advised liim that the Oakland "30" won ils class event in the 
Belvedere hill-climb against n large list of entries. The Oakland 
made 1 :01 as against 1 :0S% made by the next fastesl machine. 
The Oakland "40" also showed well, taking second in its event. 
and making time but one-half second slower than the winner. 

* * * 

The Diamond motorcycle tire bas achieved great popularity in 
the local Held. The factorj baa a branch thai gives particular 
attention to this department of tire construction, and their suc- 
cess is well evidenced by the satisfaction motorcycle owners are 

getting. 

* * * 

Dr. George Lee Eaton, the prominenl San Francisco phj ii i iu 
and President of the Board of Health, has jusl m i a iur into 
the bills bad of Modesto in his I le\ nes car. The ' ■ 
accompanied by a party of four, and reports an enjoyable outing 
for all. 

* * * 

Charles A. Warren ■ i-' 1 houses several cars, is 

stanl user of Morgan & Wrighl tireB. He has jusl recently had 
his big Thomas equippe I ■ i the Moi gan & Wri 
Treads. Weinstock-Nichols Co. made the equipment. 



A Perfect Score 

FOR THE 

SPLITDORF equipped Reo and Mitchell Cars 

IN THE 

New York— Atlanta Reliability Tour 

Only the Besl and Most Dependable Ignition 

enabled these cars to achieve this splendid 

result. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coas\ Branch 
520 VAN NESS AVENUE San Francisco 



The Hill Climbing 
Car 



V ELECXRIC 



BAY CITIES ELECTRIC CO. 



1554-56 Van Ness Ave.. Sin Francisco 
Phone Frtnklin 1275 



1760-62 Telegraph Ave.. Oakland 
Phone Piedmont 203 




Automobile Owners, Dealers and Makers Agree 

that the Bowser outfits for storing gasolene are the Best, 
but some motorists have the Impression that they must 
be quite high priced. This Is a mistake, for we make 
some very low priced outfits, which embody to a remark- 
able degree the many features of the high priced ones 
which have made them so highly appreciated, viz: the 
pumping of gasolene with a few easy strokes, directly Into 
the car, without exposing It to the air, thus avoiding all 
fire risk; the storage of the liquid without leakage, 
evaporation or contamination, giving pure, strong gaso- 
lene, full of vitality, which Is so essential to enjoyable 
motoring and economical fuel consumption. Further, by 
enabling you to buy a barrel of gasolene at a time, 

the "Bowser" Saves from 25 to 50 % on the Gasolene Bills 

S. F BOWSER & CO. Inc . Fort Wayne. Ind. 



Ask for Bulletin 81. 



San Francisco Office, 612 Howard Street 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



Tips to Automobilists 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will go well to cut this list out and keep it as a guide*. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
14-MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Automobile Supplies and Re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

SAN MATEO. — Brown's Garage, 350 B street Phone Mateo 57. 
C. J. Brown, Prop. Open day and night. Expert automobile re- 
pairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 

NORTH OF BELMONT. — Cypress Lodge. Fi rat -class mixed drinks. 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties. CHAS. P. HOWKE, Prop. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
PALO ALTO. — Palo AJto Garage, the only first-class fire-proof garage 
in Palo Alto. 443 Emmerson street tone and a half blocks from depot.) 
Expert automobile mechanics. High-grade oils, gasoline and sundries. 
Carah & Schenck, prop. Phone P. A. 333. 

SAN JOSE— Stop at LETCHJBK'S New Garage lor first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive panurs lor ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner oi Fust and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BKUS." GAKAGE, Market and SL James 
streets. 2O.U00 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. (See under Stockton.) 

SAN JOSE — jLAinolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 26U N. Mon- 
terey streeL 

GILROY HOT SPRINGS. — Twelve miles of fine, good road from Giirov 
Just the place to &ta> over Saturday and Sunday. Hot plunge. Good 
fishing and hunting; gasoline and automobile oils. 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout. Telephone 
Main 861. 

MADRON E. — Madrone Exchange. A. Boecker, Prop. Gasoline. Meals 
at ail hours. Phone Farmers y3 for special chicken dinner. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 
UKIAH, CAL. — Uklah Garage. John Snow, proprietor. Expert auto- 
mobile repairing, Sundries, Oils, Gasoline. Best equipped garage In 
Mendocino County. Open day and night. Telephone 1263. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
Warren's Garage. Fully equipped blacksmith and 



CLOVERDALE. 
machine shop. Expert Auto Repairing, Gasoline and Supplies. 
and night. Phone Main 221. Geo. F. Warren, Proprietor. 



Open day 



CLOVERDALE.— United States Hotel. M. Menihan, Proprietor. Only 
first class hotel in town. Electric lighted. Hot and cold water in every 
loom. Detached baths, special attention to touring parties. Phone Main 
233. 

SANTA ROSA. — J -louts Auto Co., Mendocino avenue, one-half block 
north of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oils 
and gasoline. Open day and night, Tel. 527. 

BOYES HOT SPRINGS.— Steve's Grill. The automoblllst's paradise— 
where you can obtain the finest and most appetizing breakfast, lunch 
or dinner In the State of California. Special attention given to auto- 
mobilists. Wines and liquors of all kinds. Tel. Sub 64. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT, CAL.— Enterprise Machine Works. H. Slotter and J. A. 
Schneider, Props. Forbes street, between 9th and 10th. Phone 66. Ex- 
pert auto repairing, electrical work. Agents for Pan hard Oils and Greases, 
Gasoline, Batteries and Auto Supplies. 

NAPA COUNTY. 
NAPA. — Elegant roads from Vallejo. through Napa County. The GEO. 
D. REYNOLDS GARAGE. 208 N. Main street Automobile repairing and 
sundries. Panhard Oil a specialty. 

PETRIFIED FOREST.— Five miles from Callstoga, on the Santa Rosa 
road. One of the world's wonders. Here the eye is attracted and the 
mind is overwhelmed in a bewildering mass of giant trees trampled to 
earth by the forces of early volcanic action and long since turned to stone 
Good automobile road. J. I. NELSON, Santa Rosa, R. F. D. No. 6. 

ST. HELENA.— Philo S. Grant Garage. Phone Main 771. General 
Machinists. Expert automobile repairing. Oils, sundries and gasoline. 
Service at all hours. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 
STOCKTON— WALLACE BROS.* GARAGE. 30 S. Sutter Street. Most 
convenient location. Best of service. Large stock sundries. Rambler, 
Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Main 287. (See San Jose.) 



AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

444 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Everything for the Auto at Prices which are Right 

Open Evenings Until 9 P. M. Open Sundays Until 3 P. M. 



Next to the contesting cars themselves, public interest in the 
Glidden Tom lias centered on the records made by the various 
makes of tires employed. As on former years, the Diamond tires 

have c through with a substantial lead to their credit. On 

the forty cars that started, sixteen were wearing Diamond 
strictly stock tires. The twenty-four remaining cars were divided 
among six other makes of tires. Before the tour was completed, 
however, two of these later had changed all around to Dia- 
monds. Of 24 blow-outs registered, four were on Diamond tires. 
twelve on the next largest competitor, and eight were distribute! I 
among the remaining five makes. A total of thirteen Diamond 
tires were replaced on account of cuts, while fifteen were replaced 
by the next largest competing make. This same competitor suf- 
fered 63 punctures as against 55 suffered by Diamond tires. 

Ralph Robitaille, who drove the Chalmers pilot car, declares 
that Use Diamond, with which the machine was equipped, gave 
excellent evidence of their superiority, llalladay, who drove a 
press car carrying seven passengers for the entire distance, com- 
pleted the trip with the same Diamonds that he bad on at the 
start, and declared them at the end of the tour in excellent con- 
dition. 

* * * 

At the last meeting of the Association of Licensed Automobile 
Manufacturers then' was a general discussion of words that had 
crept into the automobile business which, in the opinion of 
many, were unfair to the trade as a whole. The term "com- 
mercial ears" as applied to freight-carrying automobiles, was 
considered a misuse of the term, from the fact thai all auto- 
mobiles are commercial and practicable. 

The general opinion seemed to be that in future automobiles 
should !"• termed "passenger automobiles" and "freighl automo- 
biles," just as the railroads term their equipment "freighl ears" 
and "passenger cars." 

* * * 

By driving the entire distaace from Los Angeles to San Diego 

and return with a Great Western in 9 hours and 58 minutes, 

Earold Stone came into po ton of the handsome permanent 

trophy cup offered by the Chahslor & Lyon Motor Supply Co. 
for the record of this run. The best previous nine made by the 

former holder of the cup was 1U hours and '.'1 minutes. The 

distance covered is 322 miles. 

* * * 

The Iiayncs factory has the reputation of having the most 
efficient painting department in the United States. This adds 
very materially to the elegance of the ETaynes cars, beside giving 
the original paint in which they come a lasting quality nol often 

found. Al present a Napier green ear is being shown on the 

i i - Aii i o Sales Co. s Boor, and is attract ing much a i lent ion. 
Ii i- one of the neatest machines that ever came to town. 

* • • 

A iil' the al ardent supporters of Morgan & Wright Xobby 

Tread tires is c. William Kolb, the famous German comedian. 
Koii, own- a Chalmers "30," with which he has toured practically 
all of California. When he took delivery of the machine, it was 

wearing nobbie8, and al] of the original (ires are still giving 

excellent service. Kolb reports tire troubles one of the problems 
that never bothers him. 

* * * 

The Splitdorf Magneto and Spark Plug | pie are very well 

pleased with the work done by the Three Flags Flanders Car. 
which is making such a grand mowing in the Irip from Quebec 

to Mexico. The ear ; < equipped with Splitdorf Magneto and 
Spark Plugs. The ignition proved positively faultless. Con- 
sidering the great distance traveled, the company is fully justified 
in its endeavor to advertise the facl to the public. 

* • • 

A. Shilling, of Oakland, the prominent tea, coffee and spice 

man. has just taken delivery of an Oakland car from S. (i. 

Chapman. The ear is beautifully equipped and will be used for 
pleasure purposes. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

NOTHING BUT THE BEST 
CHANSLOR & LYON MOTOR SUPPLY CO. 



Polk and Golden Gate 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Jl i.\ L6. L910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



In regard to the newspaper report thai the Matheson Motor 
Car Company is in the hands of a receiver, C. W. Matheson saj - 
thai the action of the Matheson Motor Car Company in apply- 
ing i" the courts oJ Luzerne County, Pa., for a receivership is 

entirely friendly, and in reality spells bul a step in the direcl 

of the expansion of the manufacturing company. The immedi- 
ate cause for this step was brought aboul by the action of a few 
creditors who were pressing their claims to the detriment of the 
company. For the conservation of the interests of all, the re- 
ceivership was decided upon as a friendly protection. The 
indirect cause leading up to the action was the dela\ in the ship- 
ment of materials to the factory during the cold, wet spring 
weather and general slump in the stock market, which lias af- 
fected deliveries on dealers' contracts Eor several hundred caTs. 

The company is solvent, the assets exceeding the liabilities by 
over two hundred and sixty-two thousand dollars. The company 
i- rapidly converting its materials into finished ears, and will 
continue to ilo so in order In execute lie contracts HOW in hand, 
and it is expected that the receivership will ho temporary only. 

The Matheson Automobile Company is not in any way affected 
by the action of the Matheson Motor Car Co., the latter being 
merely the source of supply of Matheson cars, which are mar- 
keted by the company. 

* # # 

The Splitdorf Mairneio was a five-times winner at Dead 
Horse Hill, Worcester, The following representative American. 
cars were carried to victory by the leading American magneto: 

Event No. 4A — Won by the Splitdorf-equipped Jackson ear. 

Event No. 5A — Won by the Splitdorf-equipped Cameron ear. 

Event No. 5A — Won by the Splitdorf-equipped Cameron car. 

Event No. 12B— Won by the Splitdorf-equipped Staver-Chi- 
cago ear. setting a new mark for ils class; the Splitdorf-equipped 
( lole a close second. 

Event No. 14R — Won by the Splitdorf-equipped Jackson ear. 

* * * 

A unique contest has just been devised by the Hudson Motor 
Car Company, of Detroit, Michigan, for Hudson owners. Everj 
owner who enlers the contesl must, on either -Inly 16th or liih. 
make a tour of not less than one hundred miles in the machine. 
The owner need not drive, Iml if not driving, be musl accompany 
the driver on the trip. 

* * * 

10. 'I'. Huffman has just established a new record from Sao 
Francisco to Merced in his Chalmers "30." The distance is 150 
miles, and Mr. Huffman made il in '> hours and 1(1 minutes, 
beating the train schedule by fifty minutes. 

* * * 

The Standard MotOT Car Company reports delivery of Ford 
cars made laai Friday to W. S. Beeman, of Tuolumne; Wagner 
Auto Co. of Fresno; Adolph Brystle oi Uedding; and Charles 
Myers of I tixon. 

* * * 

Mel G. Johnson, Buicl distributor for Arizona, and one of the 
best-know n automobile men in the West, is in San Frai 
Johnson began his Buick experience through association with the 

Howard Automobile i lo. 

* * * 

1 1. II. Ilavden. formerly with the Stndebaker Bros, in S 
inenio, has jusi joined the sales i Howard Automobile 
Company. rJayden is an automobile man of wide experience, 
ami will doubtless achieve a prominent place in the local field. 

» * * 

Harry J. Moore believes 1909 Chalmers "in" holds 

the record For mileage at the smallest expense ol anj car in the 
city. The ear has nin 70,000 miles, and the expense has 
practically nothing. 

* * * 

The new home for the Ilavnes \in-. Sales I ompany, now be- 
ing constructed on the corner of Turk and Van Ness n one. is 
ipletion. and will he an eminent addition to San 
From isco's automobile colonv . 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR VALUE 
Examine the KLINE-KAR Before y°" •>">' 




6 Cylinder, 45 h.p. #2500. 4 Cylinder, 30 h.p. #1575, f. o. b. 

FRANK O. RENSTROM CO. 

424-446 STANYAN STREET Opposite Golden Gate Park 

BRANCH S. W. CORNER GOLDEN GATE and VAN NESS AVENUE 
REPAIRING IN ALL BRANCHES AND SUPPLIES 



FOR SALE 

Autocar Runabout 

'With top, lamps and generator 
in good condition $200. The 
most reliable of them all. 

453 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



Tire Cost is Lessened 

THE KEATON VULCANIZING WORKS 

616-618 Van Ness Avenue 

issue a new 

GUARANTEE ON RETREADS 

which should interest, all owners. This guarantee is practically 
the same as that governing new tires and is most liberal in its 
terms. It will pay you to investigate this practical form of tire 
insurance. 

The Keaton Vulcanizing Works 
818-618 Van Ness Ave. 

REMEMBER THE NAME AND THE PLACE 



"Exito" Sparking* Batteries 

BATTERIES CHARGED AND OVERHAULED 

ELECTRICAL VEHICLE CHARGING AND REPAIRING 

AUTOMOBILE WIRING FOR ELECTRIC LIGHTS 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 630 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Franklin 2772 



Vulcanizing 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

Phone Market 6370. 



42 Van Neaa Avenue. 



San Franclaco, Cal. 



nr 



e r m o \ 



B 



Brake 
Lining 



Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 
FACTORY 
REPRESENTATIVES 



544 Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



Many of the older people, who do not possess an intimate 
acquaintance with the automobile, often express surprise when 
walking with children to hear the latter announce that the lasl 
car that just passed was such-and-such a make. This is consid- 
ered remarkable by the elder?, who imagine that the youngsters 
have a supernatural power or truly wonderful knowledge. The 
knowledge, however, is gained by the children as a result of 
some distinguishing feature or lines that bring to their minds 
the name of the car. Oftentimes it is the radiator, but more 
often it is the hub cap that bespeaks the name of car, just as 
certain trade marks become so well known that the instant tiny 
are seen the article or goods carrying the trade mark are recalled 
to mind. 

One of the most easily distinguished cars for this reason is 
the Seidell car. Its hub cap, a brass S with red ami blue back- 
ground iu brass circle, is different, and about as striking as any 
hub cap used on any car. The Selden "S" is so out of the ordi- 
nary, and is so consistently ased by the Selden Motor Vehiele 
Company, that it is now pretty generally known, and as a result, 
ears of this make are easily picked out even by children. And 
so it is right down the list of cars. About every car made has a 
distinguishing hub cap different from every other car, and an 

unwritten law forbids imitation. 

* * * 

Paul L. McMullen, who is tearing Lake County iu his Thomas 
"6-70," has just astonished the inhabitants of that corner of the 
world by setting a new record for il" 1 run from Lakeporl to 
Bartlett .Springs. This distance, which includes a particularly 
severe sixteen mile grade, was made in one hour ami thirty-five 

minutes. The machine carried seven passengers. 

* * * 

Captain Dougherty has just returned to the city after a week's 
stay with the militia, where be proved the feasibility of the au- 
tomobile for us in anm Bervice. The captain leaves this week 
for Yosemiie Valley with his family. They will make the trip 
in their Chalmers "30." 



A QUESTION OF WADS. 
Over in Marin County they have just organized a Good Roads 
movement, and it is taking hold in good shape. There is no 
more beautiful country in the world than that around Tamalpais, 
and good roads would mean much more money in circulation. It 
is an uphill fight to produce good roads in a county thai bas 
been misgoverned. Marin pays as high a tax as any county in 
the Slate, and yet its roads are a disgrace. With the Good Roads 
movement en. a movement to utilize tin' State's convicts in goodj 
healthy work, should be fostered ami tin- reads should receivs 
Ibe attention of a convict force. In Ibis way the State would 

receive something foi its m iy, the convicts would be healthily 

employed, the county of Marin would have a splendid syste ! 

reads, the PifltolesJ gang would have its grafl supply cut off, I 

the fax-payer get something for his money. 



Now is the time to have your carpets cleaned — while away 

on your vacation. Telephone to the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning 
Works. 989 Golden Gate avenue (telephone Market 643), and 
they will call for them. You may allow them to remain at the 
works until your return, or have them returned at once, as you 
desire. All work guaranteed. 



IER0LENE 

(Just remember the name] 

The One Oil for 
All Gasoline 
Motors 




"When you find a 
better oil than Zero- 
lene — use that oil. ' ' 

V ^^K^rltLi/l' ^ or a " tv P es °f cylinders and 

^ ^r yfi bearings. Made in one grade 

■* only — Nothing to remember but 

the name — Zerolene. In sealed cans with patent 

spout. Barrels for garage trade. 

Sold by most dealers ; if not at yours, write to the 

Standard Oil Company 

1 Incorporated ) 
461 Market St.. San Franciico 



When the best argument our contempo- 
raries can make for their oil, is that 

"It is the same as MONOGRAM." 
"Looks just like MONOGRAM." 

Why not use that standard of excellence? 

MONOGRAM OILS 

See that you get it. 



Ask for it 



NEW YORK LUBRICATING OIL CO. 

GEORGE P. MOORE, Pacific Coast Manager 
586 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pure Water for Oaklasd 
Alameda 

incorporated Berk Hey 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 

treated, but bacterlologrlcally purified by electrical process 6 gallons 

DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. (1.60 per month. Sln«le S fall on 

bottle, 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4192. 
980 450i Street Oakland. Csl. 



RENAULT "The Car" Guaranteed For Life 






NEW PRICES FOR 1910 






Closed Cars 


Touring or Runabouts 




complete 




complete 


Voituretle 






11750 


9 H. P. 


J31MI 




2500 


10 H. P. 4 cyl. 


3500 




3000 


12-16 H. P. 


4000 




3200 


14-20 H. P. 


5500 




4500 


18-24 H. P. 6 cyl. 


"Little Si*" 6250 




5250 


20-30 H. P. 4 cyl. 


6500 




5500 


2S-3S H. P. 4 cyl. 


6800 




5800 


35-45 H. P. 4 cyl. 


7500 




6500 


50-60 H. P. 6 cyl. 


Bit six" asm 




7500 



ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT' FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 



316-322 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone, Market 7038 



JUL! 16, L910. 



and California Advertiser 



33 




m liscuss such questions? What for i jn influ 

i - poisoning their minds? 



( hi.iixT to < >cn 
Monroe Doctrine. 



The belief is mm pretty general in 
European as well as in American 
diplomatic circles thai very likely 
during the Argentine Exposition at 
Buenos Ayres an unofficial conference will be held by delegates 
from all the Latin- American Repuhlics in Central and South 
America to pave the way for an official consideration of the limi- 
tations of the Monroe Doctrine in so far as the doctrine is 
thought to apply or may be applied to the protection of the re- 
publics as against themselves, especially with reference to inter- 
nal commotions, which do or may threaten to do injury to inter- 
national trade and threaten investments of foreign money in 
local enterprises. There is no question in the republics nor in 
Europe as to the scope of the right of the United States to inter- 
fere in the premises should a foreign power attempt to acquire 
the whole or any part of a Latin-American State by force or 
by purchase. Under the declaration of the Monroe Doctrine, the 
United States would be obliged to defend the integrity of the 
assailed State, even to the extent of refusing to permit a Latin 
republic of Central or South America to transfer any of its ter- 
ritory to a foreign nation by sale, gift or otherwise. The Monroe 
Doctrine is very clear and very decided on that point, but the 
question of the right of the United States to protect a Latin re- 
public against its destruction by its own hand is now for the tirst 
time engaging the serious attention of the several diplomatic 
centers. If, as several of the republics hold, the Monroe Doc- 
trine does not directly or by implication give the United States 
the right to maintain peace and good order, even though internal 
disturbances may for the time threaten the commercial interests 
of the Americans and jeopardize American investments. Prac- 
tically every one of the Central and South American States have 
agreed to participate in the Buenos Ayres conference, but not 
so much as even in an indirect official way: at the same time 
the several .States cannot help knowing the range of the discus- 
sion nor the views that the leading men of the repuhlics enter- 
tain on the question. So in effect, the conference will speak 
for all the republics, unofficially, to be sure, but what is ex- 
pressed unofficially could be given official character and import- 
ance by reconvening the convention as an official body. 

From the view-point of the American interpretation of the 
Monroe Doctrine, this conference could and might result in most 
serious results by greatly weakening the defensive position of the 
United Stales, which the Monroe Doctrine indirect.} secures. It 
is well known that for some time several of the Latin repuhlics 
have not been averse to listening to overtu gn nations 

for the purchase of outlying island territory in the Pacific and 
Atlantic Oceans and Caribbean Sea. Certainly thus far these 
overtures have met wilii rebuff, bo far as our State Department 
knows, but thai islands, the territory of the 1. could 

1 1 t 1 1 1 purchasers in Eoi i ?n lands at verj extravagant 
goes without saying. Tie i -. or some of them, would 

make splendid naval stations an and water 

erafl operations. Now, iretty well-grounded sus 

thai the Lai in republii - are contemplating a ne 
for themselves to include a declaration that they will have no 
more paternal supers ton of their domestic or inter-republic 
affairs by the United SI ites, and thai according to their new in- 
terpretation of the Monroe Doctrine it is limited to protecting 
them against warlike demonstrations by foreign nations, and 
that while it may. three-quarters of a century ago. havi 
guard over them Ig enough, when united, to 

defend them oreign aggression, and that the time 

has come in their national life to be their own judge as to what 
ins they may sustain to the Governments of the outer 
world. In other words, the time has come when they will no 
longer be tied to the apron strings of the 1 
one m that this country would have to be shorn of its 

lighting strength before an\ foreign power would be alien 
establish naval stations and military posts on islands that skin 
Central or South America, and yel the Buenos 

is. Why should th. 



i ii Gen eh m. i ntekest. 



The King of Spain tells his parlia- 
ment he wants the greatest publicity 
g:\en to the speeches of the members 

and the policies of the Gover nl, so thai the people uu>. be 

well informed on what is transpiring in State affairs. 

The bill revising the English coronation oath has passed to 
lie first reading without objection. 

The protecting powers have finallj fixed up the Cretan trouble, 
and Turkey and Greece have quit all war talk. 

The Turkish war minister asks for an army appropriation of 
$45,000,000, but he says a big slice of it will go to improving 
the nation's public highways that, the movement of troops, if 
needed, may be expedited. 

A Franco-Germanic syndicate has agreed to invest Sv'I.ihmi.- 
000 francs in the securities of the German-Asia .Minor-Bagdad 
enterprise. 

The British Government is thinking of sending Lord Kit- 
chener to rule Egypt against the protest of the natives. 

Premier Asquith announces that a fall session of Parliament 
cannot he avoided. The Lord's veto is the trouble. 

The nations are at peace, and one hears no war talk, but all 
countries are busy building warships. 

The first South African Parliament is scheduled for Novem- 
ber next. 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco is located at 626 

Merchants' Exchange building, where all business of the Citi- 
zens' Alliance is transacted. The Free Labor Bureau, of the 
Alliance, in Oakland, is at 804 Broadway. All classes of male 
help is furnished, absolutely free, to employer and employee. 



.„l||||||lll 



IIN'IIII 



iill II 1 1| llll" . .it ..Li 



DC 



J" 1 ' 






Each in itself 
an attainment. 

■ C A M B R 1 D G B oc 

•" in boxes of ten fcjC 

AM B \SSADOR , ; 
'•*b tbe aller-dinner size «30C 

"The Little Brown Box" 

Philip Morris 
Cigarettes 



ORIGINAL 
LONDON 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 



Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M 
and by appointment 



Phone Douelae 4188 



Qalen Bide.. 391 Sutter Street 
San Francieco 



34 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,300,000 



Assets, $ 7,000,000 



California and 8an«om« Street!, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, »400.000. Cash Assets. $370,146 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams. Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green President; John C. Coleman. Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton. John "c. Cole- 
man. W. E. Dean. F. P. Deerlng, E. F. Green, James K. Mofntl. J. W. PhiMirs. Henry 
Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son. * 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California. 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Cash Capital »1,000,000 

Cash Assets 6,966,216 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,790,360 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDINQ, 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital J6.700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agents. 
160 California 8treet San Francisco 

The We& Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

BAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K, Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Geo. 



Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
til California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas till 



PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 

Incorporated 1885 

SURETY ON BONDS 

PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 

Head Office-FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

FRED B. LLOYD, President 



Murphy Grant & Company 

■Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 



New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



ASK YOUR 
DEALER FOR 

GOODYEAR 

'HIPPO" 

HOSE 




GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
R. H. PFASE, Pres: S89. 591. 593 Market St.. S. F. 



Guaranteed to 

Stand 700 lbs. 

Pressure 

Try ll and Be 
Convinced 




INSVKAM 




[nsurance Commissioner Cooper has informed the Eochcstor 
German, which hist month' established a coast genera] agency 
with Gordon & Hoadlcy, that it cannot he licensed to do business 
in California until after it has submitted to an examination by 
the New York department. The rule that all companies applying 
for a California license must first be examined by their home 
departments will, hereafter, be rigidly enforced. 

* * * 

Special agent John A Prinsen, of the Prussian National, act- 
ing under instructions of the United States mi ge nt, is up 

from Los Angeles Eor the purpose of recommending a San 
Francisco connection, the company having decided to return to 
tin' city after an absence dating from shortly alter the greai 
fire. 

* * * 

George H. Townsend, for many years in the employ of the 
Connecticut Fire, and Eor Beveral years in the capacity of special 
agent, leaves to accept a similar position with the Aetna on the 
Coast. Charles Van Tagen, Eor years with the Pacific Board of 
Underwriters as surveyor, takes the position with the Connect i- 
ein vacated by Mr. Townsend. 

* * * 

The examination of the Pacific Surety Company, of San Fran- 
ciseo, completed last week, shew- the surplus as of May 31st, of 
thi- year to have been $62,000. Funds since contributed swells 
'In- net surplus i" $101,293, and increase- the capital paid in 
cash i" $278,380. The examination, which was most exhaustive 
was participated in by the States of Minnesota, Colorado ami 
California, Minnesota being represented by Lee .1. Wolfe, Colo- 
rado by Examiner Clayton, and California by [nsurance Com- 
missioner Cooper ami Examiner Curburt, the whole. under the 

immediate supervision of Actuary S. IT. Wolfe, one (if the most 

thorough and experienced examiners in the country. The West- 
ern Casualty ami Surety Company, which was organized in San 
Francisco and received it- license Prom the California [nsurance 
Department on the first of the yeer, has been reinsured by the 

Pacific Casualty and i|iiit the business. The business iif the 

company this year show - a large increase "Ma- tin- volume w ritb n 
last year, and it ha- been found necessary to lease a portion of 
the thirteenth Hour of the First National think Building in ad- 
dition to all of the seventh Hour for tin- accommodation of the 
working force. Seventeen agencies have been established in 
Arizona, four in Nevada and sixty-five ill California by Special 
Agent .lames S. While, within the past sixty days. 

* * * 

Many companies thd. immediately Following the big conflo- 
gration of 1906°, established Coaal headquarters oil' the street 
in the high business blocks that offered light and Fresh air in 
place of thi prevailing dust, noise and darkness of the lower 
levels, have been Forced to leave their perches at the action of 
brokers who persist in patronizing the more conveniently located 
office at the street levels. During the present week. Harry Mann. 
of the New York Underwriters ; Manager FCenney of the \\ estera 
am] British America, and P. L. Hunter of the Northern Assur- 
ance, have all moved from the big Merchant-' Exchange building 
to spacious offices opening directly off the street. .Many have 
sacrificed valuable lea-- to effect this change. 

* * * 

Gordon Bennington, assistant superintendeni of Qie Oakland 
office ot the West Coast I. if'-, was on July 12th Found guilt) oi 
misdemeanor embezzlement. Bennington withheld a portion of 
the payment For a death loss on the life of an infant, securing 
the mother's receipt for the ''nil amount, and appropriating the 
remaimli a to his own purposes. The jury that convicted him 
was out three minutes. 

* * * 

President J. P. Magee. of the Associated Underwriters, Inc. 
announces the acquisition of the Merchant.-' hire Assurance Cor- 



.h i.y 16, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



poration, of New York, and the National Lumber Insurance Co., 
of KufFalo, both companies being standard, old-line American 
lire insurance companies. The Merchants has a surplus to pol- 
icy-holders exceeding half a million dollars, and has upon its 
Board of Directors such men as John l>. Rockefeller, Jr., anil 
Frederick l>. TJnderwbod, president of the Erie Railroad and 

Director of the Wells-Fargo Company. 

* * * 

The Pacific Coast headquarters of the British America and the 
Western will be moved from the Merchants' Exchange to Leides- 

dorff street on Monday. 

* * * 

The ruling of the Attorney-General of California to the effeel 
that all companies that have tiled continuous bonds must re- 
place them with yearly contracts has so far been modified as to 
permit of -the continuous bond with the cancellation clause elimi- 
nated. 

* * * 

George C. McConnell. grown gray in the insurance service, 

i lied after a lingering illness at his home in San Francisco on 
July 12th. He was for many years cashier for the Pennsyl- 
vania's Coast department under Manager Osborn. 

* * * 

Secretary George W. Brooks, who has been spending a lew 
weeks in the mountains, is at his desk again, making hay for 
the California Insurance Company. 

The Oakland, Cal., Board of Public Works has referred to the 
City Attorney and Fire Marshall bids on one motor-driven fire- 
engine and three motor-driven combination hose and chemical 

wagons, and for 5,000 feet of fire hose. 

* * * 

The (ire losses of the United States and Canada is reported ai 
$13,183,600 for the month of June. The total for the half 
year is over four and a half-millions less than the record for the 
same period in 1909, and more than $25,000,000 less than the 
aggregate for the first half of 190S. while June exhibited a more 
reasonable record this year than in the preceding two. There were 
190 fires during June, which in each instance caused a loss equal 
to or in excess of $10,000. There were twelve which caused a 

loss of $200,000 each. 

* * * 

The rate on Alaska fish fanning factories has been reduced 
fifty cents, making the basis rate of 2% per cent on the build- 
ings and 2 ner cent on contents. 

* * * 

Trie officers of the new loenl hoard at Ogden. Utah, are: Geo. 
.T. Kelly president; O. A. Kennedy, vice-president; J. II. 
Knauss. secretary; B. IT. Goddard, treasurer: Geo. J. Jelly, B. 
11. Goddard, J. J. Brummitt. Edward Audi and C. it. Kussey, 

execul ive committee. 

* • • 

The Spokane, Wash., committee appointed by the local agents 
of that city to confer with the Pa< ifii Board regarding commis- 
sions, consists of Messrs. Ensign. Kern, Webster, Venable and 
others. The agents claim that they are not on an equal basis 
with non-board officers on preferred business, and thai they hay-' 
nol an equal opportunity with the agents of the lar{ 

the I 'nasi Slates. 



Under the title ''To Oysorland." the Oregon Shori Line 

lias published a beautiful booklet, describing the man, 
beauties of the eountrj traversed by that line, and especially the 
Yellowstone National Park. The work is not only well-written. 
in excellent type and on he:r \ paper, but it is illustrated with 
many handsome colored half-tone pictures, which make graphic 
showing. Not onlv the park itself, but the regulations governing 
tourists and visitors, arc among the features of the booklet, 
which is surely of such a character as to persuade any one to 
make rhis nover-to-he-forgotten trip. 



The 1910 issue of the Dauchy Company's Newspaper 

Catalogue has appeared, and is. if possible, an improvement up- 
on all of its predecessors. It is a volume of 758 pages, well- 
bound in cloth and printed in large, clear tvpe upon heavy paper. 
invaluable -to advertisers, thi ■ein<r clcarlv ar- 

ranged, and the pages being provided with a ml., - 
making memoranda, this being a novel feature in publications id 
the kind. The catalogue is published by the Dauchy Company. 
9 Murrai v York. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francieco 



Luxury 

Convenience 

Contentment 



Golden State Limited 



Ask about the low 
rate round trip 
tickets Ea£t on sale 
certain days May 
to September, 1910 



Southern Pacific-Rock Island 

Ticket Offices: 

Flood Building. 882 Market Street. Market Street Ferry Depot 
Third and Townsend Sis.. Depot 

Broadway and Thirteenth Street, Oakland 



•THE POT CALLED THE KETTLE BLACK." 
BECAUSE THE HOUSEWIFE DIDN'T USE 

SAPOLIO 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



July '.), L910, 




A SONG FOR TWILIGHT. 

As sweet as purple dusk, as fair 

As morning shaking out her clouds of sunny hair. 

So sweet, so fair, art thou. 

Ah, no — not now. 
1 had forgotten — no, not now! 



that were thy praise. 



This was thy likeness in flu' days 

When all the world seemed singing songs 

Thy heart was sweel and soft, 

Thy face how oft 
I thought the ilawning light — bow oft ! 

\u\\ . should another lover ask. 

Thy heart but as a stone, thy face but as a mask, 

T needs must paint, and ssrj . 

Ah. not to-day, 
All. ask no more, no more, to-day. 

Only when now and then I drearn 

\ moment (and forget), thy face and heart doth seem 

So fair and sweet once more 

That as before 
I love thee, love thee — as before. 

— Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer in Warper's Monthly. 



LOVE AND SLEEP. 



I watch above you where in dewy sleep 
You lie with parted lips as children lie; 
I watch your bosom's breathing slow and deep 

With unknown dreams — and the long hours drag by! 

Softly you sleep, and I who watch above 

Your dreaming bosom know no art to woo 

Rest unto weariness, nor unto love 

The answering love that steadfast is ami true! 

Yd. Dear, 1 blame you not! In our own breast 
Is it ordained that love be light or deep? 

Only, to-night, for grief I tun not rest, 

And you who love so little, sweetly sleep! 

— Arthur Stringer in Everybody's \fagazine. 



DEATH AND FAME. 



J. have planted a flower on the peak ; 

My soul has cast its star. 
Star and peak! and dawn's a-streak! 

An'd my tomb is where they are. 

Though never a climber scale the height 

Where my love exhales its tire — 
Though only the heavenly side of night 

Shakes with my soul's desire, — 

There, on the peak, a life's perfume ! 

There, cresting the dark, a star ! 
There, light that breaks upon a tomb ! — 

And fame is where they are. 

— George E. Woodberry, in Warper's Monthly. 



CHAUCER. 

Child of the dawn, we bear thy loving laughter 

When May and the lark arc welcoming the morn. 
And over daisied fields, past rows of thorn, 
And down a pilgrimway, where knight and squire 
With lowlier folk from many i merry shire 
Are telling tales, childlike we follow after. 

— William L. Corbin in Century. 



TFrHATT TAVERN 

X Jj V/lliLU COR. POWELL and EDDY STS.S. F. 

Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladies' Grill 

Have Secured 

SIGNOR GINO SEVERI 

to conduct their orchestra commencing April 22nd. 1910 

Concerts daily during Luncheon. Shopping Hours, Dinner and 
After Theatre 

Special Lunch Served During Shopping Hours 

Under the management of A. C. MORRISSON 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets . 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 



Bay State Restaurant & Hotel 



269 OFARRELL STREET 



Serve Excellent 
Special Lunches 
Excellent French Dinner 



NEAR MASON 



50c 
75c 



Hungarian Orchestra, 12 to 2 p. m. — 6 to 8 p. m. 



FISH A SPECIALTY 

MUSIC EVERY EVENING 

French Dinner served with Red or White Wine $1.00 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Phone Kearny 1812 Ladles Grill 




'eimv/i 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 54-64 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will Meet Your Taste Our Prices Will Please You 



BUNGALOW TO LET IN ALAMEDA 



Furnished Mission Bungalow of 8 
rooms, sleeping-porch, garage, sun- 
parlor, and large garden; 25 minutes 
to the city. 1515 4th Street corner 
Haight Ave., Alameda, Phone 2828. 



.Iri.Y 16. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



37 




Mrs. Smith was engaging a new servant, and sat facing 

the latest applicant. "I hope," said she, "thai you had no angry 
words with your hist mistress before leaving." "Oh, dear, no, 
mum; none whatever," was the reply, with a toss of her head. 

"Wliile she was taking her bath. I jusi locked the bathroom door, 
took all my things and went away as quiet as possible." — E.r. 

A raw Irishman shipped as one of the crew on a revenue 

cruiser. His turn at the wheel came around, and after a some- 
what eccentric session in the pilot house he found himself the butt 
of no little humor below. "Begorrah," he growled at last, "and 

ye needn't talk. I bet I d ! inure steerin' in tin minutes 'n ye 

done in yer howl watch." — Success. 

Senator Beveridge, discussing the Albany insurance scan- 
dals, said: "Honesty, of course, is the best policy. It seems, 
though, that this policy expired in New York a good many years 
ago." — Ex. 

Absentminded Professor (meeting a friend unexpectedly 

on a mountain peak) — Hello! Did you climb up from below! — 
Fliegende Blaetter. 

"Have yon completed your graduation essay?" "No," 

replied Mildred. "I read it over to father and be undersl I 

every sentence. I've got tu re-write it." — Washington Star. 

Caller — Is Mrs. Brown at home? Artless Parlor-maid 

(smiling confidentially) — No. ma'am — she really is oul this af- 
ternoon. — Fundi. 

"She is an artist, isn't she?" "Well 

— she — er — paints." — Houston Post. ====== 

Little Sile (reading) — Dad, what 

are the city limits, anyway? Farmer 
Kyetop — Them blamed city boarders thai 

ciiinc down here every year, mv son, — E.r. 

Bobby — What wuz the hardesl 

question the teacher asked you to-daj 
johnny — She asked me whether I'd rather 
be licked v. iih a ruler ox a strap? — Ex. 

Mr. Headofhouse How did 

parrot, get ad bis head feathers burni 5 
Mrs. Headofhouse- He -aid he want 

(lacker, and Willie gave linn one. — E.r. 

"Whal Antic experieni ea have 

had ?" was asked of an aspirant Foi pi I C 

in a polar expedition. "1 once courted a 
Rochester girl." "Accepted." — Bv 

Exjrrtss. 

"You say he actually likes having 

bis wife be a suffi agette and all thai ?" 

"Yes. He thinks it's in ip mid 

go through her trousei 

while she's asleep." I wfar. 

"Yes," said young Mrs. Torkina, 

ii sure our garden is \ be a 

success." "So Boon P" "1 e ! kens 

have tasled everything, and thej an 

Star. 

First Bridge Player — I couldn't 

make up my mind what to wear. I've 
three hats, but they're all out of 
Second Bridgi Player — 1 was in a i 
quandary. I have three hats, and I 
all the latest thing. — 

"Some people say the cornel 

largely gas an. 

said the amateur m ientist "Ifs neither," 
replied Mi. Sirius Barker. "If it 
one or 'be other we'd gel a monthly bill 
for - "". 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR IVf AGICAL BEAUTIFIER 

Remove* Tan. Pimples. Freckles. Moth. Patches. 
Run and Skin Diseases, and every blemlsri on 
beauty, and dene, detection. It hai itood the teal 
of 60 yean; no other hai, and it so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. Accept no 
counterfoil of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A. Say re said to a lady of the haul, loo (a patient): 
"As you ladies will use them. I recommend 'Gou- 
raud'a Cream' a* the leaat harmful of all the Skin 
preparation.." . 

For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infanta and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cure. Sun- 
burn and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cent*, by Moil. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. ( Price Sl.OO, br mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r, il Great Jones St.. New York City. 




Mrs. Suburbs (who has hired a man to plant shade trees) 

— Digging out the boles, I see, Mr. Lannigan. Lannigan — No, 
mum. Oi'm diggin' out the dirt an' lawn' the holes. — Catholic 
News. 

Scott — See that man who just went by? He landed in 

this city with bare feet, and now he's got a million. Mott — 
Great Jupiter! That beats the centipede to a frazzle. — Boston 
Transcript. 

"I wonder what the teacher meant about the singing of 

my two daughters?" "What did he say?" "He said that Mamie's 
voice was good, but Maude's was better still." — Catholic News. 

Nodd — Mourn for me, old man; I married a woman with 

absolutely no sense of humor. Todd — That's nothing tu my 
eross. Nodd — What's that? Todd — My wife has one. — Life. 

Hoax — Poor old Ilenpeckke has to mind the baby. Joax 

— Yes ; it's wonderful how that baby takes after its mother. — 
Philadelphia Record. 



FROM GOLF LINKS TO OFFICE 




Many a man would be unable to enjoy the healthful exercise 
of golf if the telephone did not keep him in touch with 
his business. 

A word over the wire saves him an hour's delay in leaving 
the office. There is another reason. 

The busy man's day is made shorter by the Bell Service, 
which brings him in instant communication, not only 
with his fellow townsmen, but with correspondents in 
distant cities. 

The Bell S3 stem provides universal service to meet the needs 
of all users. 

The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Co. 

Every Bell Telephone is the Center 01 the System. 





The Big Money is Made in 

OIL LAND ACREAGE 
PANAMA PACIFIC OIL COMPANY 

Report of Tide Water Oil Belt, a Portion of the Property of the 
PANAMA PACIFIC OIL COMPANY: 



The next and probably the last great nil Mold to be brought in, in California, is Located in San Luis Obispo and Monterey 
Counties, California, and probably will be known as the "Tide Water Oil Belt." The experts of operating oil companies, who 
have been in the Meld, are all in unison to its large possibilities. Mr. Slossin, who, by Mis wonderful persistence and nerve 
after repeated failures in drilling several wells, finally got one down to what was considered a great depth in those days — 
3700 feet — which brought in the greai Santa .Maria Oil Field, with its great depth of inexhaustible oil sand, which has as- 
tonished the world. This Meld lies south of San Luis Obispo a>nl Monterey Counties, and in the Monterey Shales. This dis- 
trict Mad been repeatedly and time after time turned down by all tin- experts who Mad ever examined this Meld. They formed 
their unfavorable conclusion against the Santa Maria Meld from the fact that there was enormous crnppings of asphaltum 
and by taking the measurements of these croppings and estimating it as a residue, they could figure thai all the oil thai 
possibly could be in the sands had evaporated and was gone, as this residue represented many millions of barrels that had been 
in the sands. 

The only weit that has gone to any depth on the wesl side of Monterey County up to the present time is the Pleyto Oil 
Company, with Mr. Pinkerton, the prosperous rancher of Monterey County as President, and like Mr. Slossin, pushing il 
ahead almost single handed ami alone, lie has just been rewarded by striking a big How ■>] gas and a little oil. which is bigh 
gravity, with a depth of 1900 feet, and is now only a matter of a shorl time till he enters the oil sand that so prominently 
outcrops west of the location of his drilling rig. Said outcrop of oil sand run- lor miles through Monterey County, being ex- 
posed and uplifted by the San Aulonia Anticline, which runs northwesterly ami southeasterly about 40 deg., lying between 
the San Antonia and Salinas Ilivers in Monterey County (see California map.) Tie geological and st ratigraphical subdi- 
visions which are necessary in California for a prolific yield of petroleum, is found in an ideal ami extensive regularity ill 
this county, especial!; on the above described San Antonia Anticline. The >amls. Monterey shales, conglomerates and fos- 
siliferous marine -hells, ostreatitans, pectans of the Eocene and Miocene period of the Tertiary Era, are all there and unal- 
tered, also the prolific escape of gas of thi bydro-carbon series along the springs located on the San Antonia Anticline, 
which is very prominent in the springs on the Mansfield Ranch, where the Monterey shales are LugbJy impregnated with Liquid 
oil. Where we predict, oil can be broughl iii. iii commercial quantities, at a depth not to exceed 1500 feci Erom 20 to 30 grav- 
ity oil. , 

To show the tend of the breadth westward of the Coalings oil Fields beyond the Alcalda fault line or break, including 
Walthara Valley on the West, 1 quote the following from Bulletin No. 396, 1910, of the United States Geological Survey i" 

b'allh Arnold, also from Bulletin 398, 1910, by Arnold on Coalinga. No greal amount of sediment was removed from this re- 
gion to the wide expanse of sea farther wesl in the region aoji wesl of the Salinas Valley tin Monterey County) in which 
the line Largely nonterrigenous ooze of the Monterey shah- was laid down. 

In Bulletin 396, "Paleontology of tin- Coalinga District," on pages '.'1 and ■>■?. it states thai the following Santa Margar- 
ita (upper miocene) fos>i|s from the Coalinga district have been found: at point named No. 1805, Waltham Valley, 13 
miles southwest of Coalinga: oy.-ler bed two mile- west of Slater Frame's bouse: sandstone under shale. At point No. ISP.'. 

Sandstone at mouth of Bray and Secords Canyon, south side of Waltham Valley, l"> mile- wesl of Coalinga. Thi- sandstone 
underlie- the shale in this vicinity. 

With the Etchegoin and Jaealitos formations classified a- upper Miocene, it seem- most Logical to place the Santa Mar- 
garita in the upper part of the middle Miocene, thus confining the Monterey shales i lower part of the middle Miocene. 

Such an arrangement would consign the far reaching post-Monterey distropbic period to the middle of the Miocene. 

By further reference now to a cross -ceil nade by me in L905 of the Coalinga Salinas Valley and Monterey nil Field 

you will see the correlation of same, which will enable one to intelligently study the lav of stratas, anticlines and cinticlines 
lo -liow for itself the great possibility of the future "Tide Water Oil l'„ It." 

Tn conclusion to thi- report on formation ami conditions, I wish to -tab- that after a continuous study in person in this 
field during a period of years, I have come to the conclusion and now predict that ibis Tide Water Oil licit outlined in this 
report is certain lo prove II f ibe richest oil bells in the world ami equal to any in California. 

JOHN D. HOFF, E. M. 

Petroleum Geologist 



THE BIG MONEY IS MADL IN OIL LAND ACREAGE 

PANAMA PACIFIC OIL COMPANY 

The BIGGEST MONEY in the OIL BUSINESS is made in the LAND END. The APPRECIATION qf OIL LAND 
VALUES is directly the source of the ENORMOUS FORTUNES made in the California fields. Name over to yourself 
the individuals and companies whose assets now run into the millions, and von will find thai EVERY ONE of them made 
their fortunes in OIL LAND ACREAGE, bought at LOW IMJICES! in other words, they went AHEAD of ACTUAL DE- 
VELOPMENT work and bought the land or oil rights before drilling became common. They sink a few wells and try oul 
the ground, keep their developments secret and secure all possible acreage before the general public wakes up to the fact thai 
oil is possible in that particular section. The UNION OIL COM I'ANV made its big starl in the SANTA MARIA FIELDS 
by acquiring acreage al prices of NO SIGNIFICANCE. The general policv of the com] v has since I n to ANTICI- 
PATE DEVELOPMENT. Its ENORMOUS HOLDINGS of valuable oil 'lands to-day shows the wisdom of such action. 
The STANDARD OIL COMPANY follows the same line of policy. Do you see these big operators and companies buying 
oil lands at from $'.'.11011 to $5,000 per acre? Once in a great while they do for strategic purposes, but seldom otherwise. 
Yon can canvass the various fields and you will find that these big companies and operators have tremendous holdings, all 
bought at trifling prices AHEAD OF DEVELOPMENT. 

The RECORDS in MONTEREY COUNTY show that BUi COMPANIES and OPERATORS are Now ACQUIRING 
LARGE HOLDINGS along the SALINAS ANTICLINE. The work has been going on quietly for the past year, so much 
so that even now it is becoming generally known that the MONTEREY COUNTY SECTION along this anticline is looked 
forward to as being THE COMING GREAT OIL KELT OF THE STATE. It is averred that the formation and condi- 
tions here warrant the LARGEST INVESTMENTS being made IN ACREAGE, and thai it is only a question of a few 
months when some of the wells drilling now will he opened and the entire anticline established as an oil country of greai 
productivity. It is reported that two wells are readv to he brought in at any time. One operator interested in drilling has 
acquired control of upwards of TWENTY THOUSAND ACL'FS ami still having. JOHN BAKE!!, ,11!., THE MAN WHO 
PIONEERED FOR THE UNION OIL COMPANY, is securing large acreage by purchase and lease; WILLIAM 1MN- 
KEIiTON, the UNION OIL COMPANY and the STANDARD are quietly and continually increasing their holdings. 

Heavy gas pressure. in the wells now drilling indicates the coming in of the weils. The Pleyto well is down 1900 Eeet 
with a heavy head of gas. 

The formation in this held is the same as that at SANTA MARIA and Coalinga, with every indication of the oil sands 
being especially heavy and deep. Indeed, tlie petroleum engineers are now predicting that the oil sand strata of (lie Monterey 
field will prove richer than any other in the State, for the reason that on tbis anticline for practically 4(1 miles the stratas are 
undisturbed. 

Drilling alone proves the presence of commercial oil. Grilling lias been going OB in this section for the past several 
months. The opening id' one well will prove the section as commercial oil territory and ils immediate development would he 
FAST AND COMPREHENSIVE. ACREAGE WOULD MULTIPLY IN VALUE KAPIDLY, the same as il has in 
every other Seld. HERE IS THE SOURCE OF GREATEST PROFIT IN THE OIL BUSINESS. ACREAGE BOUGHT 
AT TRIFLING PRICES BECOMES WORTH FROM $500 PER ACRE UP TO $3,000 AND $4,000. ACREAGE is now 
BECOMING SCARCE along this anticline for the reason that the big operat irs have secured so much of it. 

Eighteen months ago one of the besl known oil engineers of the State secured control of five hundred acres id' (his laud 
on exceptionally good terms — it is considered to be the best in the whole Monterey field. Gas is coming from the ground 
and water springs in many places, indicate the sources of oil sands beneath. 

Willi tin' view of operating along the line- of acquiring ACREAGE and making the large profits accruing from this source 
.in the undeveloped sections oi California oil fields, the 

PANAMA PACIFIC OIL COMPANY 

Ins Keen organized. The company will deal almost exclusively IN LAND AND LEASES; thai is. Hie acquirement of Baroe 

on terms and conditions thai will give its holdings a TREMENDOUS SPECULATIVE VALUE. Associi I with the 

company are two men who have Bpent many years traveling all over the oil lido- of the State, and whose judgment is accepted 
by all tiic big operators. Indeed, their operations arc Followed into everj field thej enter. This company will operate in acre- 
age and leases in all the field? ! 

Under the plan- oi operation this company has a chart ■ to multiply the profit of investments far in excess ••( those win. 
do the actual drilling. The money required to secure speculative holdings is comparatively small. 

We invite you to come to the ..dice and lei us show you rds, etc., gixinu Hie basis tor our action in acquirement of 

lease and acreage. f 

Wc oii'er M.n a chance to co-operate with us aloe. if operation ami on TERMS aid conditions thai will 

appeal lo you as offering a LARGE SPECULATIVE PROFT. 

The company ko-dai has FI\ E HUNDRED ACRES UNDER CONTROL, and 1- Acquiring more in the different fields. 

WE OFFER A LIMITED AMOUNT OF STOCK AT 10 CENTS PER SHARE 

THE APPRECIATION OF OIL LAND VAL1 ES IS ["HE DIRECT SOURCE OF THE 1 VRGEST PROFIT IN 
CALIFORN1 \ FIELDS. This company will deal only in land- mid lease*, control of which will be acquired on exceptionally 
attracts e specula! ive features. 

No BETTER SPECULATION [S OFFERED. L getting control of acreage al pi - ng from $5 up to $40 

a, re on purchasi an I leas 1 land upon our traits or adjacent thereto would give our holding- a very large ap- 

preciation in \ahie. 

Call at our office or write as, and we will lay before you one of the best speculations in California oil lands to be had 
am where. 

Stock can be bought on term- or for cash. No forfeiture, ami the price is the same. Our values are represented in ml 
land and leases. We are now leasing a portion of one 0!' oil - thai will drill and prove the ground. 

THE LARGEST PROFITS IN CALIFORNIA arc made in oil. LAND ACREAGE 1 tion of de- 

velopment. Our representatives are now arranging term- for acquiring another splendid trad in one of tie 

PANAMA PACIFIC OIL COMPANY 

Address or can PACIFIC BROKERAGE SYNDICATE, jSL£S£2£, r 

Phones: Douglas 743; Home C 3851 High Class Stocks Members S. F. Stock Exchange San Francisco. Cal. 



40 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 16, 1910. 



IFsmaiy IPsr©Ml®infi}§ 



Tin.- is where husbands and wives must get in line. Dame 

Custom prescribes find Lady McLaren defines. Human c 

has been found inefficient. Spontaneity and instinct may no 
Longer bo trusted. 

What though a man he a jintur.it clam ! Whal right has he to 
"shut up?" He must prove to hie wife of a dozen seasons that 
he still enjoys her compaay. He bashfully backs away and 
wonders how he .shall proceed! "The kissing and cuddling" of bia 
courtship days is taboo. Bis wife carries the spare cash, and 
would not approve of "buying dowers." Still, "it is up to him." 
Oh, he has it! He will treat her like one of the Eellows. He 
walks up, slaps her on the shoulder and says: "Say, old gal, but 

that gravy von made was bullj I" 

Wifey shakes herself loose, glares suspiciously and -naps. "You 

old tool, get along out of the wayl" And the | ■ man 

refuge with his pipe and tneditai ion. 

Then there is the man who is naturally dei istrative. lie 

e - hurrying up the steps, eager to see wifey, and to bear of 

her achievements of his morning absence. Never once does be 
unlit giving her an appreciative little hug and kiss. 

Suddenly he stops. His courtship days are over. Now lie mu 
practice self-restraint. He'heaitates and then, on entering the 
hall, he calls : 

"Sarah, did you send my launch 

A voice from the kitchen answers: "Yes, dear." 

"Very well, Sarah. I am all ready tor dinner." This Last in 
his most cheerful voice. 

"Hump!" thinks wifey. "I'm plenty good enough to 
his meals." The- dishes rattle and slam and dinner is a most 
uncomfortable affair. 

Poor hnbbv is so beside himself that after (wire sugaring bis 
potatoes, he forgets the formal restraint now in vogue, and. 
blindly relying on habit, he goi iround the table and all 
ately pals wife's hair. She burst? into tears. "Hang it all. what 
can he do?" Fashion declares that it would be bad form to pick 
her up, carrv her to a bis chair and soothe her outraged feelings, 
before hurrying away *o his office routine. 

Mrs. Oyster must "flirt with her husband." She has always 
cooked his "favorite dishes" and smiled appreciatively at his 
jokes, but custom demands something more. Their married life 
must not remain a "colorless" routine. She usually wears a plain 
gingham house dress mornings. Oh. yesl She will don her new 
black silk and wave her hair, and — yes! Charles always did like 
I,, see Bowers in her hair. She hastily fastens in a pink 51 - 
niuin. and hurries dinner upon the table a trifle late. At first 
Charles is too preoccupied to notice the change. Presently the 
unaccustomed jars him to consciousness. 

"( loing - swhere, Maud '." 

"N,,. Charles." 

"Well, whal are you dressed up for?" 

■•oil, I ju-l thought I'd slip (hi- on for a chat 

"Say. what's coming over you, anyway? 'that flower looks 
pretty gay for a woman of your age." 

Maud takes refuge in tears, and Charles hurries bark to work. 
In ling out of joint with the world. 

I. inle Mrs. Hummingbird usually watched foi hubby as be. 
returned from work, and Sitting out from some biding plan', she 
would tweak his ear and brush his shoulder, and wonder if he 
were tired, and hurry him nut of his overcoat. Such demonstra- 
tions are out of place, she read. 

To-day, husband opens the door with an expectant smili only 
to gaze around an empty ball lie noisily removes bis coat. He 
waits a moment and a strange chill comes over him. 

"Lucyl" he calls.' 

"Yes, John." 

"Where are you?" 

"Up in the sitting room." 

"Sick, Lucy?" 

"Why, no. I'm feeling fine. 
stops short and stares. 

"Lucy, are you angry with me?" 

"Of course not, but I've been reading — we are too demon- 
strative." 

"Well, of all thi notions. Can't a man do as he pleases 

in his own house?" And John indignantly stamps downstairs. - 
Kansas City Star. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $10.999. 604.56 

Cash and Sight Exchange '. 9,984,601.71 

Deposits 24,111.867.07 

Isalas W. Hellman, President ■ I. W. Hellman, Jr.. Vice-President 

F. L. Llpman. Vice-President Frank B. King. ... Cashier 

George Grant. Assist. Cashier W. McGavin. - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs. Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Isalas W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrln Leon Sloss F. W. Van Slcklen C DeGulgne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan Hartland Law F. L. Llpman J. Henry Meyer 

I. W. Hellman. Jr. Chas. J. Deerlng Wm. Hass John C. Klrkpatrick 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 
are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



John goes up two steps at a time. 
Isn't this a pleasant day?" John 



HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 
B. E. WALKER, President 
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

Tii'.- new Travellers' Cb ntly issued by this Bank are ;i most 

convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They art 
sued in denominations of 

$10. $20, $30, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is staled un the face of each cheque, while in other coun 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtain 

illce of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

San Francisco Office — California and Sansome streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial. 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1.655. 09r,.ns 

Deposits. June 30, 11*10 40,884,787.2] 

Total assets 43,108,907.82 

Remittances may be made b) Draft Po I i >ffi< e, or AWiis Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin !> 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. t<> '■', o'clock p. m.. except Saturda 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. in. i" B o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— Prepi-ient, N. Ohlamlt: First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer; 
S I Vice-President and Manage r, ourny; Third Vice-Presi- 

dent J. W. Van Bergen; Cashier. A. II. II. Schmidt; Assistant i a 

William Herrmann; s. cretary, A. II. Muller; Assistant Secretai l< 
J. O- 1 fit ■ ■' Wm I*. Newboi : !"\v & Eelis. General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, George Ti 

J. W. Van Bergen, Ign. Steinhardt, I. N. Walter. F. Tlllmann, Jr.. IS. T. 

Krns.' and w. S. ( 1 Ifellow. 

MISSION BRANCH -2572 Mission St.. tx i and 2Sd streets. 

For recelpl and payment of deposits only. C. w. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 43 Clemenl 

6tn avenues. For receipt and payment "f deposits only. w. *' 

Manager. 

French American Bank of Savings 

SAVINGS 108 SUTTER ST. COMMERCIAL 

OClated Savings Panics of San Fran- 1st 0, I 

Capital Authorized ?l 

Capital Paid-in 750.000 

Reserve and Surplus 166,871 

Tol ' ' i ■ rci r; 

OFFICERS \ Legailetl President: i. Bocqueraz, Vloe-Pn 

J. M. I »upas. Vice-President; a Bosouel Secretary; John ■ 

ler; M. Glrard, Assistant Cashier; l'. Bellemans, Assistant Cashier; r. A. 

I :■ i -> rot Attorney. 

Safe Deposit boxes for rent. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

CORNER SUTTER AND SASSOME STREETS. 
i $4,000,000. Surplus and Undivided Profits, $1.700 ,8 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. President; n. FLEISHHACKER. Vlce-Pp 

and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER. Vice-President; C. F. HUNT. Vtce- 
Presldent; R. ALTSCHUIi, Cashier: A. HOCKSTEIN, Assistant Cashier. 
This hank transacts a general hanking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and B( 
change and bullion. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



14O0 to 1480 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 30 14 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 



Ever Seen 
California's 
Holland? 



TAKE 

Southern Pacific's 

NETHERLANDS 
ROUTE 

The Daylight service between 
San Francisco and Sacramento 
via the newsteamer"NAVAJO" 

Leave San Francisco 8:00 A. M. 
Arrive Sacramento 6:00 P. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

A DELIGHTFUL SCENIC 
WATER TRIP 

for tourists and auto parties. 

Meals — Beautiful Staterooms and Parlors 



ASK AGENTS 



Pacific Street Wharf. Market Street Ferry Depot, 

Flood Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



A Swell Polish for a Swell Car 

Blue Ribbon Cream 
Metal Polish 




It makes any car look swell. 
It's an Emulsion— a thick Oil Cream Polish. Does not sattle. 

LEAVES NO POWDER OR SEDIMENT 
For sale by all dealers. Ask or write for sample. 

Use BLUE RIBBON for Speed, Durabil- 
ity, Brilliancy 

See that the label bears our registered Trade Mark 



PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 

FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES 
50 to 56 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 




If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
in your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO. 









The 

Egyptian 
Cigarette 
of Quality 

AB.OMAT1C DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PURITY 

; At your Club or Dealer's or 
TUB aURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 







DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



& A* <i* 

A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sliterl 
of St. Dominic, iltuated In Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpala Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness- 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



When the Mother's Milk Fails, 
Feed the Baby on 

BORDEN'S 

EAGLE BRAND 

CONDENSED MILK 



Known for Three 
Generations as 
the Best Food for 
Infant Feeding. 



BORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK CO. 




"LEADERS OF QUALITY" 



EST. 1S57 



NEW YORK 



THE KNOBS WILL STOP YOUR SKIDDING 




MORGAN & WRIGHT 
NOBBY TREAD TIRE 

Patent applied for. 

"Throw Your Chains Away." 
Weinstock, Nichols Co. 

569 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Phones— Market 6000; J 2*11 

" WE SELL CONTINENTAL DEMOUNTABLE RIMS." 



Pinchot Breeding More Trouble for San Francisco 



Established July 20. 1856 




s^^.^^^^^ ^rIw state ' 



.<&M 











Price 10 Guts 




SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, JULY 23 1910 




Richmond Coal 



Why do you pay high prices 
for Coal? Buy direct from the 
importer. The only firm outside 
the combination in San Francisco 



CALL OR PHONE 



J. J. MOORE & COMPANY 



KEARNY 465 OR 466 



225 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



REMEMBER YOU ARE DEALING DIRECT WITH THE IMPORTER 
WE DO NOT HANDLE LOW GRADE COAL 



INVESTORS 

Now is the Time to Buy and 
MARE MONEY 

R"E"I 7f T"\ The Signed Statement of WILLIAM IRELAN, Jr., Ex-State Mineralogist 
Hi II XJ Regarding PAJARO VALLEY OIL COMPANY'S PROPERTY: 

"1 would advise the development of the property, as the deduction from my examination warrants 
the belief that wells put down to sufficient depth would be large producers, as the geological 
conditions tend to prove that oil in large quantities is contained in the underlying sands." 

The PAJARO VALLEY OIL COMPANY is now drilling and seeks the 
co-operation of the investing public. A limited number of shares can be 
had at 20 cents each, until Aug. 15, at which time the price will advance 



For further information apply 



Pajaro Valley Oil Co. 



400 First National Bank Bldg. 
San Francisco, Cal. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francieco 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pare Water for Oakland 
Alameda 

Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 

treated, but bacterlo logically purified by electrical process. 6 gallons 

DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. 11.60 per month. Single 5 Bailor 

bottle, 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4192. 
980 45th Street Oakland. Cal. 



Hotel 

Del Monte 

OFFERS 

MORE TO SEE 

MORE TO DO 
Than any resort in the world. 

Subscribe for the Del Monte 'Weekly, a guide to 
things worth knowing, doing and seeing in California 

For rates, reservations, etc., address 

H. R. WARNER, Manager 
Chester W. Kelly. Cily Representative 406 Crocker Bid*.. S. F. Keirny 401 




CLOVERDALE STABLES 

Finest rigs in Sonoma County. Headquarters for Geyser Stage 
Line. Hunting and Fishing parties furnished with horses, buggies 
and guides. 

H. I. BARKER, Prop. 



Brushes 



PEPSIN 

CUM 



Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 
Kearny and Montgomery streets. 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and mads 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets, Chamois, 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, writs or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 



EaUNUhed July tO. 1 




FRANC|J_ 

JTBR 

Devoted to the Leading Interest* of California and the Pacific Coaat. 





VOL. LXXX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 23, 1910 



Ni. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market street, San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mall matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

It isn't so easy to catch up with the political band-wagon 

since they took to propelling it by gasoline. 

In spite of the talk of dull business and tight money, the 

motor car continues to honk high all over this favored land. 

The latest heavier-than-air record is 6,100 feet. Yes, 

Clarice, an aeroplane is an instrument for cutting shavings off 
clouds. 

Alfalfa is now discovered to be possessed of wonderful 

medical properties. Sure: didn't it completely cure Jeffries of 
prize-fighting? 

The monorail mishap in New York suggests that it will be 

a good while before the one rail road is much more useful than 
a one-string fiddle. 

Pretty soon the Ballinger episode will be over, and the 

price of whitewash may be expected to drop back to something 
like normal figures. 

Hearst publishes a whole page editorial on '''Conceit," il- 
luminated with a huge letter "I" in red ink, but containing no 
other mention of himself. 

As yet none of the bright young men who "do politics" foi 

the newspapers has hinted thai there may be 8 dark automobile 
in the Gubernatorial race. 

Late statistics show that the average German wage- 
worker's family is shy jusl $9.98 a year of balancing income and 
outgo. rXoch der cost of living! 

Hell should have no terrors for anybody who has man- 
aged to live through the kind of summer an all-wise Providence 
is iiiih passing oul to New York. 

■ A million-dollar hotel for Renol That's the Bnesl news 

ever for Pittsburg and othei centers of marital incompatibility. 
Telegraph early for ai emu Is 

Somehow, we doi 'I ■ ni to hear th< 

grv protests againsl the efforts of an itinerant gospeller to pul 
the crusher on the i a industry. 

Miss rernor whisked through San Francisco at 

such speed that he did no s bance to abx>w him anything, 

i even (he places where the run be. 

Coyob Golden Gate Park i 

heretofore have been of t he two-legged kind, addicted to biting 
chunks out of the bank rolls of guileless tour- 

'•Daisy" was a poor little Spits dog. the pet of 

York couple. Every Christmas they had a tree for her. and 
when she died, and a funeral to 

match. Problem: How long did it take the census man to 
enumerate the children in that flat? 



Br'er Taft has now got a whitewashed man a-workin' for 

him in the Interior Department. 

A Minneapolis preacher defends from the pulpit wdiat 

he calls ''public spooning." Naturally; it is a practice that leads 
directly to the County Clerk and the parsonage. 

Jeffries is waiting for his feet to thaw out before he an- 
nounces whether or not he will give the "abysmal brute" inside 
of hirh a return match against the triumphant coon. 

If Mrs. Hartje conies out of her long divorce campaign 

with only $6,000 a year, why is it that the newspapers are so 
much interested in whom she is going to marry next? 

It will be observed that although his automobile upset 

and his legs were hurt, Secretary of State Curry kept rigid on 
running after the Governorship without missing a step. 

Ohio's war on the Demon Rum has progressed to such a 

stage that the anti-saloon detectives are shooting up his emis- 
saries and allies and getting lynched occasionally for doing so. 

Rockefeller sees in the near future one great church em- 
bracing all faiths and all the world. "Holy John" believes the 
S. O. idea is good enough to work out as well for religion as for 
oil. 

Upton Sinclair puts on the mantle of prophecy, and fore- 
tells another civil war with Roosevelt playing Lincoln's role. 
The part of Jeff Davis had not been assigned when Sinclair came 
out of liis trance. 

"Big Jim" Gallagher writes that he does m>t know 

whether he will ever return to the scene of lies profitable adven- 
tures in municipal statesmanship. British Columbia is unite 
i ne to this expatriate. 

King Edward, despatches from London say, never read a 

I.. No, indeed; the late monarch's reading was devoted to 

those volumes which the poet bad in mind when he wrote; "All 
books were woman's looks." 

Among Los Angeles youn re is reported to be a 

Harrying It might be suspected 10 rasa 

it the Chamber of Commerce is already at work 
og things fixed up for the next census. 

Woman, declares a Massachusetts university president. 

mr souls. It has long been suspected that there was 

ig with the mathematics of the person who coined thai 
pleasant old saying about "Two souls with but a single thought." 

And now the British military authorities are compelled to 

problem even tougher than that involved in keeping up 
with the Kaiser's high-speed naval programme, for the Germans 
jone into the business of building a fleet of "Dreadnaught- 
of the air." 

It has been figured out that during the six years of 

McClellan's rule the advertising bill of New York City's Gov- 
emment was This removes any doubt there might 

: ming the real motive of Editor Hears?! frantic 
to get the job. 



EID>IIT©UAL COMMENT 



It is necessity, not desire, that puts and keeps public service corporations in politics. 

These organizations are, in the broader sense trustees of all who hold their stocks ami so are bound to guard their inisis. 
lo administer them with the utmost skill and the minutest economy thai competitive conditions ami regard lor future develop- 
ment will permit. They arc bound, moreover, to render a just return to those whose invested funds they hold, as well as to pro- 
tect the investment. In these respects thej d I differ materially from banks ami txusl companies. 

Besides all that, they are bound to serve their patrons, not intermittently, not in fair weather and good times, but in all 
weathers and all times, continuously, at any hazard. Transportation, gas, water, light, power, lelephone and telegraph service 
these the public must have upon demand and without delay. No excuse suffices to account for continued or repeated failure of 
the service the people served may call tor — not even it the demand, be doubled upon the normal over night ; Dot even it calamity 
and pestilence and even war interfere. 

The rendering of Buch Bervice rail- for much more than great resources of money, h needs the highest quality of technical 
skill and the ripest experience. That i- why the best in the way of brains and talent that the country produces and develops is 
avidly absorbed by the big corporations; thai is win the largest salaries in the land are paid by the public sen ice corporatipns. 

'Pbe captains of these corporations are tlie picked ami chosen experts and specialists, (be best of their lime. Fitness is lb le 

test of their choosing, n is they who have made the 1 nited States lead the world in industrial develoj nt. Ii is thej who keep 

trains running, gas ami water flowing, ami wires working every hour of every day in the face of (be worst nature can do. through 
storm, flood, quake ami pestilence through war and riot and panic. Thej are the engineers who run the machinery whereby a 
nation lives in com fort and security. 

San Francisco is a living and grateful witness lo what (lie modern public service corporal ion doe- in tii f stress: ibis city 

icmembers the contrast between the machinery ol Government and that of the public service corporations when ;i ,■ i lisastel 

paralyzed them. both. It remembers which was the first to be restored ami to renew (be usefulness without which disease and 
starvation might have wrought evil beyond any suffered from earthquake and tire. 

But the worst evil, the heaviest handicap of the public service corporation is not to be found in physical misfortune. 
That may be provided against and insured against. Year by year the percentage of loss and interruption from misadventure or 
natural came is reduced in all lines of public service. The real peril of the public service corporation is mote insidious, more in- 
sistent; a thing not to be measured or provided against or offset by insurance. This peril is political, a vicious and set ming 
inevitable incident of popular Government, h explains the presence of the public service corporation in politics. 

Probably the most hateful and thankless business of the men who run public service corporations is to proteci those con- 
cerns against private rapacity, most often masking as reform. The men who run the affairs of the corporations arc. generally 

speaking, among the besl citizens of the communities where they live, moral, upright, charitable, religious, 'foremost In •_■ 

works, conspicuous for their patriotism and for right thinking and right doing. Their employment demands the highest type of 
American manhood and gets it. Can as much be said of public employment or public office? Can as much he said of the polities 
of the country? Offer the corporation manager political appointment or nomination, and get instant refusal. Yet the same m in 
must engage in politics or be unfaithful lo bis trust ; must lake active part m a game which be abhors or else see his trust 
robbed, ruined ami himself disgraced. 

Public service corporations have t mey or time lo waste on fad- or ramies or prejudices. Guarantee, if that were pos- 
sible, a fair, square deal to all capital legitimately invested ami employed; insure such capital against legislative raids an 
self-seeking hostility of demagogues in executive and administrative office, and then witness the immediate disappearance of the 
corporation from any department of politics. Let capital lawfully engaged in the gigantic and exacting business oi serving the 
people conduct that business without hindrance or attempt at spoliation, and capital will welcome the chance to let politics 
alone. 

But the politicians will not let capital alone. Too often the man seeks the office for the chief purpose of enriching himself 
by tribute levied upon the agencies through which the people provide Ihemselxcs wilb the < ■-- ntiab of their living. [Tsuallj the 
easiest road to power and place for the selfish, unscrupulous office hunter is by wax' of attack on these agencies. The cheapest 
and commonest, and. unfortunately, the mosl effective manifestation of demagogism is assault upon the public service corpora- 
tion. The masses are easily misled. They see what looks, like huge profits, and never figure where those profits go, never know 
or care to know among how many they mu-i be divided, what debts musl be paid out of them, what provision must be made oul 
of every dollar earned against the needs of the future. The demagogues do no) even whiBper these things; they are too busy 

shouting about the power and the gr I of the corporation and its "menace" to the republic: too much engaged in frothy ami 

false-hearted promise to kick it and ils agents ami servants off the map. Many such demagogues are elected to office, bui it is not 
of record that any of them has done any kicking except at the door whereby be may come to the cashier of the corporation. 

There are also greedy and vicious interests ever ready and ever Bcheming to grab at the earnings of the public service 

corporation. These, too, wear the livery of "reform." They continually spread misrepresentation of il rporation's thods 

and motives; thej capitalize the demagogue; they foment dissatisfaction; they Btir up strife as between the corporation and 

the rank and file of its employees. Instead of finding a publii I d and then developing legitimately the means of filling it, 

they wait for honest men to do the work, and then harry them ami hinder them in the hope of swift ami safe profit. They are 
the wreckers of industrial life, the highwaymen and cut-throats of the thoroughfares of public service business. Behind the dema- 
gogue are always lurking these predatory influences, lie insepaiable curse of careless and unthinking popular government. 

And there are also the little rogues that thrive by harassing the public service corporation — rogues with pens and tongues 
for sale to the demagogues and « reckers. It is hard to distinguish between these and the fanatics who lash themselves into furies 
of hatred against capital mi relj because it is capital. Thej speak the si i language, employ the same arguments, address them- 
selves to the same unthinking ami careless elements of the community. Their purpose may be different, but their effect is iden- 
tical. They both play their part in forcing upon the corporation the distasteful and wearisome participation in politics 
which corporations are so much abused, and yet without which they would be speedily ruined and their funds, the accumulated 
and invested savings of the public itself, would be parted among the wreckers and the demagogues. 



Ji t.i 23, L910. 



and California Advertiser 



There is bu( one way. one lawful way, open to the corpora- 
tion, and ill' larticipate in politics. Thej do participate, 
some wisely and successfully, some stupidly and ineffectively. Ml 
thej seek is on from ruinous legislation. Thej wanl 
lionesl men in office; courts deaf to the cries of the demagogues 
and blind to prejudice; Governors and commissioners and makers 
and administrators nf law who will deal with the corporation as 
they would with the individual; fair men as representatives of 
the people, of character and discernmenl such thai thej will no) 
be Bwepl aw:n by popular clamor. Observe the manner of men 
Eavored by the corporations for office. Witness that they are 
conservative men. proved business men, men of substance and 
achievement. It would be a suicidal policy for any corporation 
to seek to put in office a weak or a bad man. The safety of the 
corporation lies in good and just laws, well and justly adminis- 
tered. That is all rhe corporation in politics cares about, all 
it asks. 

Ultimately the corporation as a corporation will have nothing 
to do with politics. That will lie jusl as soon as the people take 
enough interest in their own Government to make it clean id' 
the wrecker and the demagogue, to make il as fail- to the aggre- 
gation of citizens — for that is all any corporation is — as to the 
citizen. After all, the public service corporation could not exist 
without great public need for its services or without the people's 
money to finance it. There arc very few men in rich America 
who are rich enough to establish and run a railroad, a municipal 
gas plant, a water system, a telegraph line, single-handed. As 
these agencies are demanded, men pool their capital ami combine 
their energies to create them. As the agencies grow and more 
and more money is needed, stock is sold, and so the people become 
or may become partners in the enterprises. As soon as the ven- 
tures begin to return dividends to the originators and the invest- 
ors, the vultures begin to swarin, I he wolves to follow'. They 
canned", physically rob the corporation, hut, by means of perver- 
sion' of the functions of governmeni and legislation tliej can 
harass and feed upon il. Whatever may be the views of the cor- 
poration's members and officers, they arc driven into politics. 
lesl courts and legislatures and missions be turned against 

them lo their undoing. 

The fundamental human law is thai of self-protection. Ii op- 
erates a> inexorably for (he issociation of individuals as lor the 
individual. More than thai : the individual may elect to sacrifice 
himself, hut the individual acting as the trustee and guardian 
of the property of others is doubij and trebty obligated to defend 
ami conserve that for which and with which he Thai is 

precisely the ease of II irporat ion in pol : bag no .el- 

vanlago. hut demanding and lighting tor its lawful ri 



The Pinchot- 

.lollNSON CoMMM 



ord 1': in hoi takes himsell 
nsly. Hi- measure of himself 
statesman and factor in Ameri- 
can political and economic life is 

conspicuously exaggerated. Mr. Pinchot is in California at bis 

own invitation to tell I 3 ite what their political 

dnh is al this tune. Why or wherefore lie place- so low . 

lice of the people of California that he is 

constrained to volun f'ux t.> them thai it they would 

have the stamp of loyalty lo the Stale and nation placed upon 

their Fo •> showing post --ion of rea- 

inon sense ami -I - I i n n I '• ill, as "lie man. 

ip and confer the Governorship ol the Commonwealth on 
one Hiram Johnson. Mr. Pin son for volunteer- 

ing his advice to the California other than that he is 

personal!) fond M inson and would he pleased to - 

friend thus highly honored. I; is ol no particular consequence 
at this moment w not Mr. J ihnson is acting on the ad- 



i ii '■ oi M r. Pinchol i hal cau i • him lo refuse to agree to 

porl the nominee of I he party 'a convention, unles inee 

he himself, thus reserving the right to repudiate die wishe ol 
i ii partj and affiliate with the enemj to punish in- party for be- 
ing -o blind ami ignorant as to be incapable of knowing a g I 

thing when il places itself in the glaring lime light of monumen- 
tal self-sufficiency and assurance, We say ii is of not particular 
consequence as lo Mr. Pinchot's advice in the premises, so far as 
In- influence in California is concerned. When Pinchol resigned 
I rem the Interior Department ''under sire.-- of circumstance.-' 
for the public good," he reserved the right, as his friend Hiram 
Johnson has assumed the rigid, lo repudiate the will ami wishes 
of his party, if the party in its wisdom declines his terms for 
personal support of and acquiescence in the party's declarations 
and the personnel of its chosen candidates. 

Hiram Johnson has, by implication, notified the Republican 
party of California that he shall act upon Gilford Pinchot's ad- 
vice and "bolt" the nomination of any man for Governor other 
than himself. 

Put why is Pinchot in California at this time? lie himself 
gives the reason. He "has it in" for the public transportation 
services of California. He says the railroads are a bad lot. He 
says they bribe people to do all sorts of evil. The common car- 
riers hereabouts, however, never offer bribe money until it; is de- 
manded, no more than the wayfaring man surrenders bis cash to 
the footpad until it become a prudent act of self-defense. More- 
over, the bribe-giver waits for the bribe-taker to specifically in- 
voice the goods he has for sale and the price thereof. The man 
with money on his person never obliges the highwayman to hold 
him up. ft is always the other way. But Pinchot says Califor- 
nia is being held up every day by footpad railways, and that he is 
in California to help his friend put the common carriers in jail 
so that good men will not be tempted to sell their souls for 
money. How would if do for Messrs. Johnson and Pinchol lo 
spend a little time in trying to explain the difference between 
bribe-giving and bribe-taking, and also to point to a single case 
in history when the bribe-taker was not on the ground in advance 
of I he appointed time. 

All of these wild statements are a gro-s and wicked libel on 

San Francisco and California, and it is in the public mind and 

hear) in repudiate Mr. Pinchpl Eor falsifying the people >>' 

California and their mighty commercial center. 

W 

— - — The amassing information is cabled from London thai 
visiting Americans, this season, are nol spending their money 
freely. In fact, they -'.re decidedly stingy, ii reports are to be 
belii i id, in ordering all the more expensive articles on which (be 
hotel keepers and restaurateurs make a - I margin of 

profit. For this the Britishers nave , : to blame. Noth- 

ing pleases an Englishman more than criticising an Am- 
and lo- years the traveler from this country has been ridiculed 

and laughed at for bis vulgar displa '. which, in the 

majority of ee from generosity and good nature. Bui 

aerican traveler, be hi i rich and vulgar, di 

like to he considered ridiculous, and : - i'V himself, 

while abroad, those luxuries which, at ho ded a- 

rather than make of himself be laughed 

at. And France ami England are paying for the lesson. If the 
American goose, that laid the golden killed. 

it hast deeply wounded. 

IB- 

A Mexican capitalist has put v. _ irick building in 

the metropolis of the sister republic and named it "Edificio 

■ It." Obvioush a right" with t 
tan o •!' • 



6 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



Clean Sports foe 
School Children. 



While the city's public school teach- 
ers and pupils are resting and mak- 
ing holiday, it is a good time to 
think and talk about a new deal as 
to the physical culture side of the education San Francisco is 
giving its boys and girls. That side of their education means 
much to the citizenship of this place during the next generation, 
and. indeed, all the generations to come. The little chaps and 
the lassies that swarm in the public school buildings this year 
will pretty soon be the men and women of the city. Whal they 
are to be in body and mind depends largely upon what is done 
for them in the next few years in the schools. The kind of 
fathers and mothers they will make depends chiefly upon what 
we of to-day do for them, physically no less than mentally. 

So let the schoolboys and schoolgirls of our time have the best 
there is in the way of opportunity to grow up strong rind sound. 
First of all give them places in which they may deepen their 
lungs and build up muscle to make them hearty, husky men and 
women. Then encourage them to wholesome rivalry in (be sports 
that are worth while — the honest, legitimate pastimes of youth. 

They can get along nicely without the nerve-destroying, heart- 
straining distance races and without the crippling football con- 
tests that offer nothing except to the few, and to them only 
opportunity to injure themselves. But they do need school and 
inter-school stimulation in the saner aDd more helpful recrea- 
tions that may be participated in by any boy or girl with the nor- 
mal equipment of arms and legs. Baseball, basketball, tennis, 
swimming, gymnasium exercises and such-like sports and pas- 
times are to the body what the "three R's" are to the mind of 
the schoolboy and schoolgirl. They are clean sports and they 
make for soundness and cleanliness of mind and body. 

It is earnestly recommended to the Board of Education by the 
News Letter that the matter of playgrounds and recreation fields 
for all the schools, primary, grammar and high, be taken up at 
once with as much interest and attention as any other depart- 
ment of instruction and culture. Every school should have its 
athletic director, its playing field, its gymnasium and its physi- 
cal culture course. Every school should incite and encourage 
its pupils to such use of these facilities and opportunities as 
will make physical development keep pace with the unfolding of 
the mind. There should be school and interschoo] prizes for 
proficiency in all the sports that are healthful. The Board of 
Education should itself take a direct interest in all such compe- 
titions, and use its best endeavors to set up and maintain a high 
standard of sportsmanship among the schools and the scholars. 

A I rained mind in a neglected and weakly body docs the world 
no good. Brain and muscle and eye and bear! — they must all 
work together in harmony and co-ordination to make the whole 
and perfect manhood and womanhood, to achieve happiness and 
attain success. (Jive to-day's children a chance to play. Teach 
them how to play. Broaden their shoulders as their minds 
broaden. That way. and in that way only, will they be given 
whal is their due, and the due of humanity. 

3B- 
The argument that California needs 
The TARIFF and and wants high protection is as far 

California. from being rooted in truth as is the 

assertion that California needs and 
wants a lower tariff. No sane man would claim that California 
would prosper if her products were brought into free competition 
with the products of the Mediterranean country or with similar 
products of the Latin American States, nor would any well-in- 
formed person insist that California should be so thoroughly 
walled in that reciprocal trade relations could not be maintained 
with the outside world. A policy of live and let live, and trade 
doors that swing both ways are what the best interests of Cali- 
fornia needs. Arbitrary customs duties are a serious handicap 



to the accumulation and distribution of importations and ex- 
portation. The existing schedules of tariff exactions exert a 
hurtful influence upon the channels of commercial interchange 
between this coast and the Orient and the islands lying between. 
We of the Pacific Coast do not want the kind of protection 
against a continent that is as dependent upon reciprocal trade 
intercourse as we are to increase the volume and value of the 
interchange that exacts everything and gives nothing, as our 
present customs do. We may depend upon it that the Orient 
will not bring its annual output of hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars of goods and wares to our shores and pay us exorbitant cus- 
toms duties for the privilege of coming. More than once the 
Orient has made this clear to us . But are the Pacific Coast 
industries and commerce doing anything to remedy these un- 
equal and hurtful conditions? The Orient lies at our very door 
waiting to enter with tons upon tons of the commodities of com- 
merce that we have a home demand for, and the same ships 
would go down to the Pacific laden with our products and raw 
materials if only they were encouraged to do so. High protective 
customs duties may be desirable to the Atlantic Const country, 
but they only serve to lock the doors of the Orient in the face of 
the Pacific Coast centers of trade and manufacture. 

lb] i the Pacific' Coast, especially and particularly San Fran- 
cisco, is just now facing another arbitrary handicap. By a rul- 
ing of the Interstate Commerce Commission, the transcontinental 
railroads are ordered to adopt freight rates to and from Nevada 
trade centers and Eastern points so discriminating in favor of the 
East lhat they wili practically shut San Francisco out of that 
territory. Hitherto Nevada has been a profitable field for San 
Francisco jobbers of goods and wares because the rates from San 
Francisco to Nevada points were based somewhat in proportion 
in distance, this city being located in profitable reaching distance, 
but under the new ruling of the Commerce Commission. Nevada 
is removed, figuratively speaking, but in reality as to freight 
rates, several hundred miles away from San Francisco, and the 
same distance nearer to our Eastern competitors, competitors 
who, by their geographical location, have no right to expect to 
compete for business that properly and by reason of contiguity 
is naturally a trade territory of San Francisco. 



".Mrs. Naggett," said the doctor, "your husband needs a 

rest. He must go to Hastings for three months." "'Oh, splen- 
did!" she exclaimed. "I'll be delighted to go there." "Very 
good. You go there for three months after he comes back. That 
will give him six month's rest.'' — Tid-Bits. 



\.. matter bow fastidious yoil may he. (he Italian-Swiss 

Colony's AST! SPECIAL, HIM", will please you. It is a deli- 
cious sparkling white wine (Champagne type) naturally fer- 
mented hi i he bottle. 




"SWAN GIN" 

Imported from Holland since 1819 
IN BULK AND CASES 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

Agents Pacific Coasts San Francisco 



Jii.y 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



J 





^^^ 


_|**i| 




£«# 


El&WNCKI 


1 *q 


£>• 


*lN7 r T 







When a former patriot, early in the game that made this 

country glorious, shouted "Give me liberty, or give me death!" 
he promptly took first choice and left the other to the original 
settler. The Indians are mostly dead, now, but not forgotten, as 
is evidenced by a bill before Congress authorizing the erection 
of a suitable statue to his memory, which will be paid for, very 
appropriately, by the descendants of some of the early families 
who laid the foundations of colossal fortunes by thoughtfully 
providing the aborigines with a market for their skins. It is to 
be hoped that the projectors of the enterprise will restrain any 
possible desire to make the statue itself too descriptively appro- 
priate. Something should be sacrificed to national pride and art. 

A titled Englishman is authority for the statement that 

there is no poetry being written, to-day, even in England. The 
fatal narrowing of the intellectual horizon that isolation begets 
may be responsible for this gentleman's belief. For like reason 
he will affirm the impossibility of traveling more than a few 
hundred miles in any given direction without getting into the 
sea. I might sing to this noble lord of California's Carmel and 
its wonderful output, but he could not, dutifully, believe me. He 
would continue to stick his head in the fog and let the storm of 
poetical activity eddy around his exposed parts, firm in the con- 
viction that when it rains in Pall Mall the balance of the world 
is immediately converted into a dismal swamp. 

We can scarcely fail to be interested when rulers of any 

particular line of thought, who make history, take their pens 
and sit down to tell us how they made it. Caesar's Commentaries 
and Napoleon's Memoirs are familiar examples of this truth. And 
some of this interest may be fittingly accorded to the autobio- 
graphical narrative of a subordinate ruler of the destinies of 
men, one who, administering the affairs of his own particular 
sphere of action after his own plan, and finding that plan the 
only cock-sure receipt for formulating simon-pure success, 
frankly admits his capacity for error. I have, therefore, been 
much edified by the autobiography of James J. Jeffries, as pub- 
lished in that educational sheet, the Kxamiuer. 

Doctors have a prescriptive right to differ, but as their 

differences are sometimes prndm istlj and ineon\ 

results, it would be, perhaps, as well if they could be confined 
within reasonable limits, [nstani ie truth of this are not 

of infrequent occurrence. Medical men are, no doubt, nee 
dependent, in some degree, upon the patient's own account of 
himself, but if their setenee be worth anything, it ought to en- 
able them to distinguish between simulated symptoms and serious 
injuries. There is really no reason whj i medical witness should 
imbibe the spirit of either party t<> an action at law, and i 
least, unfortunate that an honorable '■ should be so often 

discredited In exhibitions of opinions so markedly at variance. 

1 am not only delighted, but mj personal pride is pro- 

with additional stimulus, by the knowledge that one of 
my Los ^ngeli j contemporaries has been delivered of an original 
idea with complete success, and no subsequent serious mental 
suffering. He suggests thai the State purchase two bloodhounds 
tor each sheriff in California. Disclaiming any desire to detract 
from this inspiration of my brother editor, I am. still, in the in- 
terest of economy, urged to inquire whether, if it !«• possible to 
them in -no other way. thi lodhound might not be 

used to run down several sheriffs f 



Phrenologists tell us that when an organ of the brain has 

more than its fair share of work to do it makes thai part of a 

gentleman's head, where [\ lies, sore and tender, proving the 
need of change. One of these soreheads, Willi Ins organ of envy 
prostrated from overwork, writing anonymously to this paper, 
makes an attack on a rival, and tells how the story can be verified. 
1 commonly pay no attention to anonymous correspondents, but 
make an exception in this one's favor, for he lives in Alameda 
and probably does not know any better. Whether true or not, no 
possible good can result from giving wings to such scandal, and 
right-thinking people have not the highest appreciation for the 
wit that wounds' nor of humorous skits written at the expense of 
personal feeling. This story, is so entertainingly related by my 
correspondent as to lead to the belief that its attempted circula- 
tion is for some sinister purpose. I will have none of it. 

An old gentleman who has spent a long life in business 

enterprises, and who ha« taken to verse writing in the sunset of 
his days, offers me some highly moral rhymes, that I have been 
forced to decline, and has proven very sensitive, almost abusively 
so, at my candidly expressed opinion that his hobby-horse will 
not serve to carry him to the height of Parnassus. Perhaps the 
hobby-horse which is hardest ridden, and that makes the most 
noise in the world is that which the reformer bestrides. Man- 
kind's greatest bores and greatest benefactors have been of this 
class. No small part of the variety and amusement of life will 
have departed when a universal enlightenment will have swept 
away the nursery steeds on which such eccentric natures persist 
in riding out their closing years. 

One of the oldest and most sacred traditions of journalism 

that newspapers cannot be bought, is about to be shattered by 
Emperor William, of Germany, who proposes to buy one, him- 
self. The Kaiser will do the editing, too, earning his salary as 
Emperor during the noon hour and at odd times when not solicit- 
ing "ads" with a squad of soldiers and a Catling gun. As his 
daily is to be run on the American plan, I can see vast possibili- 
ties in a business way, by the judicious employment of the many 
convincing arguments constantly and conveniently at his com- 
mand. 

Some inspired scribbler tells us that "It is the misfortune 

of San Francisco that all well-intended enterprises for municipal 
improvement is ever assailed by gentlemen who talk too freely 
after a casual study." And the most discouraging phase of the 
situation is discovered in the certainty that so long as the im- 
mortal race of fools shall remain vigorous, with undiminished 
numbers and unimpaired confidence, this condition may b 
pected to prevail. 




Freely Flowing, Simply Snowing, 
Without a Fault, LESLIE SALT. 

IN HERMETICALLY SEALED PACKAGES 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 33, 1910. 




With already two tenderloins to its credit, San Francisco is 
developing another. This is situated on Howard^ street between 
Third and Fourth, and consists of several low-class saloons, 
ranged in crony-like proximity, with dance halls and upstair 
apartments in connection. The habitues, masculine gender, are 
the soddenest sort of rowdies, and "the girls" little better, cer- 
tainly not up to the average of those on Pacific street. Both 
males and females are always in a maudlin or half-maudlin state 
— that seeming to De the manner of their existence. And the 
saloons, themselves, bursting in uncleanliness, reek, as it were, 
with the odor of their "drunks." Beyond the bartender, usually 
an individual of a Gila Monster aspect, one never sees a proprie- 
tor in any of these places. His name blats custom in the glare 
of an electric sign outside, but in the flesh be is never apparent 
— unless, maybe, he is one of the "bums." Such could be the 
only excuse for him. As for the civic authorities who grant 
licenses to these "dives," there is no excuse at all. While the 
whole quarter is doubtful, perhaps, there is no need that it should 
come to a head in such cancer-spots of vice and low-living. More- 
over, the cancer is extending itself. Very soon and it will have 
eaten its way to Fourth street. Our Police Commissioners 
are the responsible physicians in charge, but it would seem that 
they prefer to appear unconscious of the evil. Homed in cozy, 
clean quarters north of Market street, and smiling in the pomp 
of their officialdom, what are they going to do about it? Public 
opinion has required you to deny the granting of further saloon 
licenses, gentlemen; it also requires you to close the Howard 
street "dives." 

& S o" 

What is a mosquito? That is the question at present bother- 
ing Hillsboro, the town of the elite. To be "stung" by anything 
in your own class is not so bad — lots of our best have been stung 
by foreign counts and presto princes; but when it comes to be 
eaten up by something of doubtful parentage, and, to say the 
least, very large family, that is a different thing entirely. The 
matter rests with the chemists in present convention, who have 
already discovered an alloy for steel and may discover another 
to take the place of the aristocrat when the mosquito bites. Said 
Templeton Crocker to Henry T. Scott, wiping his pestered, 
patrician nose of the enemy's skirmish line: 

"These things have absolutely no breeding; they attack you 
everywhere and anywhere." 

"Perhaps not," returned Scott; "but you must admit that they 
show a lot of taste." 

The lapidolatys squamiger is the aristocratic title for the mos- 
quito. Strange enough, it was discovered as far away as plebeian 
Palo Alto, where "the lid being on," it couldn't escape. Burlin- 
game, however, uses plain "mosquito," as it picks it cheerfully 
out of its soup and soirees, glad in its heart that Hillsboro has 
twice as many. 

First Resident of Burlingame: "It has just been said to me 
by one called Tobin that the mosquitoes swarm in Hillsboro be- 
they find 'I i ill I' there." 

Second Resident: "That may be so; it takes a lot of them to 
find it." 

5 8 S 

Did Mayor P. H. McCarthy dance at the Fall of the Bastile, 
the great yearly event of the French colony, or did he not? 



Supervisor John Kelly, chosen Grand Marshal in place of the 
Chief Executive for the Labor bay parade, because the latter 
claimed he could not fill the post by reason of his bad ankle ( ?) 
would like to know. Did the sound of the fiddle and the harp 
tearing off "The Irish Washerwoman." and other delicate French 
concoctions, cause the Mayor to strike for his country and flirt 
his coat-tails in a jig? John Kelly, we repeat, is fairly dying 
to know. John Kelly, indeed, has bis black briar shillalah 
clutched in one hand as he thinks about it. the feet he must use 
in the Labor Day parade gathered ready to spring. If — but 
Kelly cannot find out; and the Mayor limps woefully and pathet- 
ically in his presence. "Perhaps you caught cold in it," says 
Kelly, artfully; "it doesn't do to overheat the extremities." The 
Mayor only smiles. But whether or not he shook his feet the 
night of the great anniversary, he is at least guilty of the follow- 
ing story, told to a group of friends from the French quarter, 
among whom was Henri Merou, Consul-Genera] of France. 

A foreign lady, on being introduced to McCarthy, put the un- 
expected question: 

"You are French, Mr. Mayor ?" 

"No," returned the Mayor blankly, and thinking perhaps thai 
she had miscaught his name, he repeated it for her enlighten- 
ment. 

"Oh, I knew it was McCarthy." she rejoined with a disap- 
pointed look, "but I fancied yon mighl be French # io spite el' it. 
I read so much in (he papers about you going to make San 
Francisco the Paris of America." 

S S S 

Charles E. Naylor, (he lawyer, has brought suit against (be 
Southern Pacific for twenty-five thousand dollars damages for 
a year"s headache, which he says was caused through negligence 
on the part of the railroad employees. Last July, on bis way lo 

San Franci-e., Et Vaeaville. Naylor avers that be was put out 

of the passenger coach in which be was riding into a caboose, 
and that some he: I tell On bi> garret The garret has 

been haunted by the headache ever since, beginning "the morning 
after." The story is not improbable. The Looker On has been 
to Vacaville, and returned, himself. It is a slow town, and one 
has to do something or some one. Anything is likely to happen 
to one returning home from it. But never in his most impulsive 
moment, and in such a connection would the Looker On have 
had the temerity to refer vocally or otherwise to the "caboose." 



IE1 



WHENTHERMOMnERSArS 

"ITS HOT" 

Thermos answers ~ 

"Certainly not' 

Ay contents are 

"icy Cold' - 

AndWhenThermometer 

GOES BELOW 
Says Thermos Bottle 

"tisnotso" 

FOR 

AIL IS HOT! HOI 

AND 

THEYREBOTfiRiSKf 

rbi! automubiunu-Yachting- Hunting- 
slckroom-nursery-ortice -factory* 
home or Travel -at all dealers - 

MCftMOS 

- 

American Thermos Bottle Company 



Ji r.v '.':;. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



9 



II. '-am.. raid that me r] might cause him to stutter and 

pronoun . the last ha] E of it. 1 [owever, a lie tdai he is a 

headache, and there are lots of heav] objects. Luekil] journalism 
isn'1 one of them, so ou>: present outpouring cannot possibly burl 
the head of Mr. Naylor. Anyway he is not at present returning 
from Vacaville. The best we can wish him is that his headai lie 
continues for another year. He can then bring suit against the 
company for twice the amount. What would a lock of Naylor 
hair be worth at such a rate? 

S 5 S 
There is no use — you have to hand it to the late Lucky Bald- 
win. Dying to the strains of passionate music, it is becoming 
more and more evident that he lived to the waltz-time of lovely 
woman. Every few days another of his hitherto unknown daugh- 
ters turns up, proud to ciaim him as a father — now thai he is 
no longer alive. The consideration they showed the old gentle- 
man in waiting till after he was dead is nothing less than re- 
markable. Never could we hope for such an alleviating circum- 
stance in our case. On the contrary, the lady would probably get 
up on some housetop close to a printing press and holler. But 
Ducky seems to have nad a way with him. If Kipling had 
known him he would have written his "Toast to the Ladies" 
differently. He would have probably left out that line, ''There is 
times when you think that you mightn't." It did not apply to 
Baldwin. But behold his daughters, beautiful and demure, 
pirouetting one by one toward us. Is there any end to them, any 
definite climax of loveliness when we can rest assured that no 
more will appear. How far did Lucky go anyway — always, we 
would judge, as far as he could. As his past reveals itself in 
tripping, skirted daintiness, how dear must the memory of the 
old boy become to the soul and doctrine of Colonel IJoosevelt. 
How few have done so much for the race — ah. few, indeed. And 
few will go down to posterity through so many channels. Lucky, 
lucky, lucky Baldwin. East, west, north and south it. was all 
the same. From Brookline, Mass., comes pretty seventeen-year- 
old Beatrice Turnbull. She is Baldwin's daughter, she declares 
— beyond the shadow of a doubt. As her mother endorses the 
statement, very possibly she is right. In good truth, with Lucky 
the man in the ease, we do not see how under any circumstances, 
she could be wrong. II is her purpose to prove herself and claim 
pari of the estate. But with so many other daughters bound I i 
come impulsively forth for the same purpose sooner or later, wa- 
it really worth while for the young lady to n self — to 
Puritan Massachusetl te good die young. Howei 
is something to be a Baldwin. Bui ii the Baldwin estafc 

divided among all tie 1 children well, we imagine ii would 

amounl to about a borseh rii Eoi ach. Bere is a 
Prank J. Murph] on the aubjei i. i ■ tfurphy was 

walking do H n stivci with a friend, when a very lovely and richly- 
gowned young lad] passed. The young fellow accompany! 
lawyer gasped bis admiration. 

" I in you know her?" hi turning ab< 

after her. 

"No," responded Murphy nonchalantly, and without interest. 

Hut In- i ompanion was atill gai i - ind in 

rapture-. "She has the poise oi an ■ess," he declared. "Are 

you Bure ] know her: Lool igain." 

Murphy looked "Oh, she may possibly be another of Lucky 
Baldwin's 

V V H 

I'b i love of Washington Dodg \-- ■ 

itigs, il has been revealed, is on the same plane as that of I 

agton for bis country. \ coo og to Do rapers. 

scraping for a Living, should nol A according fcp the cosl 

of their erection, but rather ace their income. S 

, couldD'l sei it that wai I 

the Board of Equalisation, Dodge explained it to him 



tively and in mam words, din ysessor, indeed, was nothing 
Me eloquent. Wasn't il the tall buildings thai made San 
Francisco? There thej stood, a picturesque highway, endeavoi 
ing lo rent themselves at extortionate rales and verj often they 

couldn'l do ii. It the] were in iupied- il showed al least 

i proper pride. \\ a- ii good for the Assessor lo lower thai pride 
to the level of ordinary shacks? If they bad to slugger under 
assessment, it was time enough and much more natural when they 

wore full. In the meantime, let the pom- things hold up their 
in ads and live. Taxes — why, assess the banana and shoe-string 
stands. Supervisor Nelson, of course, could not stand againsl 
such reasoning. All ho could say was: "It is a funny Dodge." 
Dodge, on his part, says it is to laugh at the "Nelson" hold on 
him. "Brilliant idea, that of Nelson's," he exclaimed, with a 

Teddy bear wink. And the greatness of it is, thai n le ever 

thought of it before — to assess a building on its cost. 



Pears 9 

Don't simply 
"get a cake of soap." 
Get good soap. Ask 
for Pears' and you 
have pure soap. 
Then bathing will 
mean more than 
mere cleanliness; it 
will be luxury at 
trifling cost. 

Siles increasing since 1789. 



\ 




/ 



SmsELiif 



Jo-sP 

l*25* conns* rz*j 




CURES 

«EADAC«€S 

104.25* 50<?,&$1°P Bottles* 



\ 



P®§fci m CM> IM® 



By Harriett Watson Capwell. 



There are various afflictions in club work that have never been 
catalogued. Now that the clubs are girding their strength pre- 
paratory to leaping from peak to peak of endeavor, it would be a 
charitable act to present a complete list of "Pests and their 
Eradication," so that this winter's work might be free from the 
usual annoyances. But I am not a JDr. Blue, and besides, it is 
a light and airy task to cleanse a city of rats compared to the 
more arduous and disagreeable task of ridding a club of Pests. 
Moreover, there are so many varieties of Pests, spineless and ver- 
tebrate, that I shall not attempt to classify them and present 
a scientific reference book. But in a loose-jointed and very un- 
scientific way I might be able to hold up for your edification or 
disapproval the common, or garden, variety of Pest, which grows 
wild in any club. 

Modern pathologists have torn to shreds the theory that child- 
ren have to run the gamut of a procession of diseases, and the 
sooner they are exposed to them the better. Measles, whooping 
cough, scarlet fever, chicken pox and mumps were allotted to 
every free-born American child, and the little Europeans had a 
few ailments of their own. But there has gradually come about 
a change; children with ailments are more carefully isolated 
from their play-fellows, and the modern physicians do not preach 
the sooner the better "theory" — they recommend the ounce of 
prevention, and refuse to regard the mumps as a sort of religious 
bumptiousness which every well-regulated child must go through. 
The day has arrived when it would not be held against a candi- 
date for office that he had side-stepped all the ailments which 
children were once pushed forward to meet more than half way. 
Club pathologists have not yet arrived at just this conclusion. 
They still hold that every club is bound to have its ailments, but 
if the trouble is contagious they appreciate that the ailing mem- 
ber must be isolated until cured. The difficulty lies in the diag- 
nosis. It is not always a simple matter to discover the ailing 
member, for her symptoms are often subtle and not usually pre- 
ceded by a rash as in the case of children's diseases. Even if 
you do discover her, it is not a simple matter to isolate her and 
prevent trouble from spreading. For example, some years ago 
the California Club was threatened with dissolution. But a 
faithful band of watchers sat around the death-bed and pulled 
the club through the valley of the shadow. "Shadow" is the sig- 
nificant word, for the trouble arose over the "color line." Clubs 
throughout the East had taken up the question, and everywhere 
trouble and disorganization had resulted. The question of 
whether the colored clubs should be permitted to join the national 
federation had split up and disorganized more than one club that 
entered upon the debate unaware of the fatal consequences. 

The physicians in the federation recognized that the disease 
made inroads on a club that might just as well escape the afflic- 
tion, and they sent a warning to California : "Don't let the ques- 
tion come up for discussion — you haven't come to the bridge yet, 
so don't try to cross it !" was the warning sent out by the Fed- 
eration. But there were agitators in the California Club who 
would not heed the advice. There was a discussion — which is 
a courteous way of putting it. As a matter of fact, it was a row, 
with the good ladies abandoning themselves to pandemonium. 
It is all ancient history now; the fires have burned out, and there 
is just one excuse for poking a pen around in the ashes. The 
lesson is too valuable to be lost to clubdom. Against the advice 
of the National Federation, the agitators in the California Club 
instructed the delegates to the convention, then about to meet 
in Southern California, to vote for the admission of negro clubs 
into the Federation. But those delegates were never given a 
chance to vote. The lid was screwed down securely on the ques- 
tion, and the wisest women in the convention were chosen to 
sit upon it, and never once did they allow any one to budge 
them by a subterfuge. 

So that dreadful meeting at the California Club, with all its 
attendant miseries, had been for naught. Besignations and accu- 
sations might have been avoided ; women who were carrying their 
lacerated feelings in a sling might have avoided the wound; 
women who hid the hurt by wearing sanitary bandages around 
their dispositions might have been saved the effort. The bridge 
was not ready to cross — it was just a figment in the imagination 
of the agitators, and its only claim to reality was as a bridge 
of sighs. 

© © © 
Agitatorsare often worthy and necessary in a club, but they 
must be divided into two classes — pests and insurgents. An agi- 



tator who agitates just to stir things up, and there exists such 
a tribe, will constantly plunge a club into hot water, and too 
many hot baths are weakening. The California Club came 
through its scalding on the color question with its energies ener- 
vated. But it soon pulled itself together, and the old guard 
keeps green the adage about discretion and valor. 

Opposed to the agitator who merely keeps her muscle trained 
for a scrap, and is therefore a pest, is the insurgent who is a 
true thinker. She is not bound to the conservative traditions of 
the "stand-patter" clubwomen. The insurgent does not think 
that what was good enough for pioneer clubwomen is good 
enough for her; she revolts against the tyranny of tradition, but 
she is not a free-booler like the agitator who .-curries around from 
clique to clique, trailing trouble on her eyelashes. 

'ihe agitator pest has a first cousin in the oliice seeker. Many 
a club has been sacrificed to the ambition of a professional office 
seeker. Now this is a pest that should be easily recognized and 
quickly subdued, but somehow the rampant office seeker does 
not always meet just defeat. Office is a legitimate reward for 
service, and to aspire to sueh a compliment is not to be con- 
demned ; but when a woman deliberately sets her cap for an office, 
instead of earning it; when she smears soot on other reputations 
if she does not actually blacken them ; when she not, only turns 
over all the stones in the road, but pitches them into other mem- 
bers' front yards; when the office and not its obligations makes 
the appeal, the aspirant should be summarily defeated at the 
polls. 

The other day I asked one of the founders of the Papyrus Club 
why she had withdrawn. The club was one of her pet ideas, and 
she had worked enthusiastically to consummate it. "After a 
year or two, I felt the atmosphere was antagonistic," she an- 
swered. "I couldn't actually define it, but somehow I felt that 
I was no longer en rapport, and I lost interest in attending, and 
finally withdrew, affiliating, instead, with the Cap and Bells. A 
little later, another member of the Papyrus joined this organiza- 
tion, and before long I felt that same unwholesome yeast work- 
ing in the dough. Then I realized why I was once more uncom- 
fortable. My name had been mentioned for office, and the mem- 
ber of my former club aspired to the honor, and was quietly but 
effectively tearing down the foundation of my constituency to 
secure the nomination — which I had intended to refuse. Jlis- 
tory was repeating itself, for the same chain of circumstances 
had grown too irksome for me to bear in the first organization. 
But this time I determined to make her show her cards — which 
1 did." A politician with "office mania" will join every club in 
town and tear down and build up with one object in view — her 
own election. 

© © © 

A third pest in club affairs is the woman who styles herself a 
parliamentarian, and is really an obstructionist. She has ac- 
quired her knowledge by the painless method — which is to keep 
one's pores open and soak in a fair amount of the law. That, is, 
it is painless to her — every one else and justice frequently suffer 
n i '>iisequence of her vaunted knowledge of the law. She raises 
unnecessary objections, and ties knots in the conduct of a meeting 
— with the result that some real parliamentarian has to take a 
day off to unravel the tangle, and the delay in the conduct of the 
38 invariably proves unnecessary. But the half-baked 
parliamentarian goes about with a superior expression, and prat- 
tles of the necessity of women being more careful about conduct- 
ing a meeting within the law. She has a passion for technicali- 
ties and an enthusiasm for amendments and by-laws, but she 
never throws herself into a cause committed to one side or the 
other. The simple justice, the principle involved, the business 
involved, does not interest her. Her brain is working out parlia- 
mentary puzzles all the while, and given half an opportunity, 
she will make any chairman grow a crop of wrinkles and a har- 
vest of wows'-feet in an hour. But this particular pest is quickly 
recognized, and while she is not rooted out of the club garden, 
she is not encouraged to spread and multiply. 



Burns Hammam Baths 

Sulphur Baths— Electric Baths 

Eddy and Van Ness Ave. and Kearny and Jackson Streets 

LADIES' DEPT.- Eddy and Van Ness Ave. only 



.li i.i 83, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




■iSa 



HM&WBN) 



no, *r~~-}u J A aUB j-x./%~i 




Henrietta Crosman in "Anti-Matrimony" at the Columbia. 

Percy MacKaye is responsible for "Anti-Matrimony." Locally 
we know him by an earlier effori produced bj Henry Miller en- 
titled "Mater." Tlie latter was given its initial production here, 
where it was only mildly successful, and was (hen given in New 
York, where it had a shorl life. The play Miss Crosman is using 
lias nol yet been Been in the big Eastern metropolis; in tart, we 
understand thai it is but a few weeks since the lirst performance. 
There is ao question that MacKaye can write brilliant lines, 
which at times fairly scintillate. He is a consummate master of 
English, and his shafts of satire and wit are both pungeni and 
pointed. To my mind, MacKaye as a playwright is very mucb 
in the making. In a measure he seems to be a sort of American 
Bernard Shaw, but unlike the brilliant-minded Englishman, he 
makes the mistake ol nol weaving an interesting tale into the fab- 
ric of his play, as an auditor dues not want to he preached to con- 
tinually. They want something lii hold the interest together, 
something tangible, and this Shaw succeeds in doing, and whieh 
MacKaye does not. In "Anti-Matrimony" he gives us five char- 
acters who do nothing but talk and talk, almost entirely unre- 
lieved by action of any kind, and then only of the very mildesi 
sort. This is asking a greal deal of the average auditor. If 
the present effort is intended to be a satire on some of our prob- 
lem plays, it can be called eminently successful, but it will appeal 

then lo a certain class who are disciples of llisen, Hauptman, 
Strindberg and others. The successful dramatist must make a 
universal appeal, 'this is an undeniable fact, one of the essen- 
tial fundamentals in the technique of playwriting. The sooner 
Mr. MacKaye recognizes this lad. the quicker will be he aide 
lo record his first unqualified success. Even ins "Sappho and 
Phaon," which Miss Kalieh used, which was from the pen 
of the same author, missed lire on account, I am told, of the lack 
of real human interest. The line- were beautiful, the language 
as line as anything that Stephen Phillips has ever dune, but 
there was the one vital essential missing, the connecting link 
which hids lor popularity. There are ..cue amusing situations 
in his present effort, he 1 'he author does not gel the laughs and 

genuine unctUOUS comedy from the material he used that he 

should. In a measure I was both pleased and disappointed. I 
was extremelj gratified to knon and learn thai in MacKaye w< 

have a satirist of the lirst rank, a man with a wonderful mind, a 

keen wdt and a trenchant pee. lie has allotted Miss Crosman a 

m iv. hly I ask to make a success "i his play, and idless lo i 

Miss Crosman does yeoman Bervice in il fforl to provide good 

entertainment. Mr. MacKaye, no doubt, has an undaunted 
spirit, and is nol aft i tow th urage of hi- convictions. 

A man of his splendid a, i- desen in- II' 

has lorliiinli' and splendid hope. I shall observe with much curi- 
osity what In- next dramatic attempt will be, in course 
remain- i" be -ein in"-. \ . •< ,- irl will receive his latesl play. 
In the eyes oJ the I nol 

amount to much, hut if I maj li I ui ed, 1 would hum 

set forth the facl thai "Anti-Matrimony" falls short 

a success. It provides plea-nut entertainment, and will no doubi 

ioyed .... 

your average p II not be In her desperation 

to make Ihe play a BUI i 688, I I bought i ial M ;- I 

era! oci asions almos 

that she was bi D ry effori to make the most of her role. 

The ail of Mis i d, and she inn- 

considered when Darning the best actresses oi the day. SI 

deserving of a play which will - tter and give In 

opportunities. Ther - she should 

do big things. 9 physically and mentally. 

and her past ai hii - '"■ has in: 

spirit. Her Mistress \ \ Uwynne" was a mag 

triumph, whieh will he remembered I'm a long time, p 
Mr. Me 1\ " . 




Annette Kellerman, the perfect woman, "'l'" will appear ll/i* 
Sunday matinee at the Orpheum. 

practical lines to write another plaj for Miss Crosman. I want 

right here thai I am an ardeiii admirer of everything Mr. 

\la. Kaye « rites. There i< no Am. i presenl 

day who wield- a more hriHian is he knows 

if ihe actual ami prai I ie technique o 

ess. I a 
body who enjoys brilliant satire to see "Anti-Matrimony." The 

cast. .1- ■■. erv 

live p. ' Fortier and Gordon Johnstone, who 

are the only two men in thi Qra Carlyle 

Ie which requin - leculiar 

kind, and which could be easily overdrawn. Elizabeth Baker is 

s the Mother. The i ■ tty. Miss < 'ros- 

inan has a I and will no do to weeks of 

very satisfactory basin -"lately dif 

-. il is nol of : 
ason wliy » see it. 




Society 
Stationery and Engraving 

PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Our rooms are cordially open to visitors. 

239 Grant Ave., between PoA and Sutter Streets 
San Francisco 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



James K. Hackett in "Monsieur Beaucaire" at the Alcazar.^ 

Hackett is at last in his element, back to the land of romance 
and frills and furbelows, with his trusty sword by his side, the 
land in which he reigns supreme. It is as a romantic actor that 
Hackett has won his greatest success, and in this particular 
sphere there is no actor on our American stage to excel him. 
Next to him in this particular line of work I rank Otis Skinner, 
and those who have seen Skinner in such roles as De Grammont, 
Claude Melnotte and Villon will no doubt agree with me. Sothern 
is a capital romantic actor, but is not fitted physically. The 
younger generation who have never seen Hackett have a decided 
treat in store. And by all means do not miss him in "The 
Prisoner of Zenda." This play is next in order, and in it. 
Hackett won his biggest success, and made the part of Prince 
Rudolph entirely his own. It lias runic genuine thrills to the 
minute than any play of the kind ever written. This week he is 
also seen to decided ad vantage. The phi)', as I remember, was 
done for some time by Creston Clarke with some success. It 
is one of the very first efforts, if not the first, of that clever In- 
diana playwright, Booth Tarkington. He collaborated with 
Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland in ''Beaucaire." It is a pretty 
conceit, a companion picture to that other delightful play, "Kitty 
Bellairs," and both are placed in the same period. There is the 
glint of sword throughout, the dash and necessary air of chivalry, 
when men were ever ready to draw their sword in defense of their 
honor or their fair lady. There are a number of exciting situa- 
tions, without which any romantic drama would fall flat. With 
Hackett as the moving figure, there never seems to be a dull 
moment. That Hackett has won instant favor locally is attested 
by the immense houses he is drawing, and the unstinted and gen- 
erous applause he receives nightly, and everywhere through the 
theatre one can hear the pleased comments of the auditors. As 
I have stated before, he has gained histrionically. He has be- 
come an actor of ripe attainments. He is a past master in the 
school of romance. He is always a commanding figure, as he is 
so superbly fitted physically. Seats will no doubt be at a pre- 
mium during his engagement, and deservedly so. It is a treat 
we have not had in a long time, and we are not liable to have 
Hackett with us very often. He is ably supported by a long list 
of characters. Arthur Hoops is again the villain of the play. 
While not a wonderful actor, Hoops has worked so long opposite 
Hackett that all their scenes move like some well-oiled machin- 
ery. And they are splendidly matched physically, which is for- . 
tunate, too. In all candor I must admit that I am disappointed 
in the leading lady that Hackett brought with him from the 
Bast. Miss Beckley, the lady in question, has not the beauty nor. 
the ability for the very important roles she is called upon to en- 
act. True, she is intelligent and conscientious, and makes a 
brave effort, but she does not fill the eye, nor in point of ability 
does she satisfy. However, as Haekett is always such a dominat- 
ing figure, her shortcomings are not noticeable to the casual 
observer. I was again more than pleased with Miss Calhoun, 
the bright little ingenue, the new and permanent acquisition to 
the Alcazar forces. I trust that the management will be as for- 
tunate later in the addition of the other new people who have 
been engaged for the regular season. Will Walling is very good 
in a role calling for no special efforts. He is alw.i , - rel table, and 
always striving. Bennison is very good as Beau Nash. These 
two actors, with Hoops and Hackett, certainly form a formidable 
quartet, all being well over six feet in height. Charles Gunn is 
very satisfactory in a light comedy part, and the same can be 
stated of Wesner and Corrigan. Herbert Farjeon, as the faithful 
servant, is good, as is Walter Belaseo. There are a number of 
smaller roles all placed in good hands. The dressing of the play 
is very picturesque, particularly the women. Your average 
theatre-goer delights to see pretty stage pictures. It helps un- 
questionably to hold and retain the interest, and this is no doubt 
one of the important reasons why plays of this kind have such 
a popular hold. With Haekett as the central figure, and with a 
capable supporting company, and plays which have the tendency 
to quicken the pulse, and which are redolent of good red blood, 
what more could one desire. There are five acts, and five set- 
tings in "Beaucaire," and the Alcazar management has done itself 
proud in this connection. The third act in particular is really 
beautiful. The working forces at this popular house must have 
their hands full these days, and wonderfully well they acquit 
themselves, as we rarely see productions of the highest price 
which are better mounted than those of the Alcazar, where the 
plays, too, are on for only a week. Do not fail to see Hackett, 



but be advised and secure your seats well in advance, because 
'they are bound to be at a premium. The houses this week have 
been filled to overflowing. 

* * * 

The Orpheum. 

A programme of great merit is being given this week at the 
Orpheum. The principal feature is that of Edwards Davis, M. A., 
and his company in his own dramatization of Oscar Wilde's "The 
Picture of Dorian Gray." Whatever may be the general opinion 
of the worth of Wilde's philosophy, there is no denying his genius 
and the biting truth of many of his cynicisms. When it comes 
to the haunting line? from "The Ballad of Reading Gaol," 
"For all men kill things they love" — powerfully given by Mr. 
Davis, one may differ with the statement, but never deny the 
beauty even in such an incarnation of pessimism. Beauty is an 
attribute of this sketch, as are cynicisms and scintillating wit. 
but not pessimism. In killing the things they love, a man and 
woman find what is infinitely preferable. The pride of beauty 
is killed in the one; the pride of intellectuality in the other, and 
it is suggested that free from these hampering bonds, the two 
characters will expend. Very briefly this is the way in which the 
lesson is brought out. Cyril Wme, played by Mr. Davis, is a 
distinguished actor, proud, clever, worldly-wise to a point of 
satietv. Dorian Gray, a beautiful young woman of meagre ex- 
perience, has had her portrait pain terl by Basil Hallwood, an ar- 
tist and a friend of Vane's. She falls in love with the actor and 
meets him at the studio where he is disguised as Lord Henry 
Wotton. Her great joy is in her beauty until she is made to real- 
ize how temporary it is. while the man alone thinks of his intel- 
lectuality until in the face of a passionate love for the girl it 
sinks into oblivion. Mr. Davis was formerly a clergyman, and 
for four years was pastor of the Central Church, Oakland. 

James Thornton is also being well received. He has a line of 
new songs and jokes, and is making a bigger hit this year than 
last. 

The Imperial Musicians are not up to the Orpheum standard. 
Their selections are good, but their execution of them is poor. 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and Stelner Streets. 
Phones— West 1400. Home 8. 4242. 



Belaseo and Mayer, Owners and Managers. 

Monday evening, July 25th. and throughout the week, JAMES K. 
HACKETT. in a magnificent production of his greatest success, 

THE PRISONER OF ZENDA. 

A dramatization of Anthony Hope's romantic novel. 
Prices — Night, 25c, to (1; matinees, 26c. to 50c. 
Matinee Saturday and Sunday. 

New Orpheum ssrsss^sr^ m. 

Safest and Mosl Magnificent Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 
SUPERB" VAUDEVILLE. 

ANNETTE KELLERMAN, THE PERFECT WOMAN. 
CLIFFORD & BURKE; THE FOUR CLIFTONS: HARRY ATKIN- 
SON; JAMES THORNTON; THE IMPERIAL MUSICIANS; PROF. 
APDALE'S ZOO CIRCUS; NEW ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES. 
Last week EDWARDS DAVIS, assisted by Adele Blood and Tem- 
plar Saxe. in his dramatization of Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of 
Dorian Gray." 

Evening prices, 10c, 25c., 60c, 75c. Box seats, $1. Matinee price! 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c, 25c 60c. Phones Douglas 
70. Home C. 1570. 

Columbia Theatre -55T" "* 

Gottlob. Marx * Co., Managers. 

To-night, Sunday night and all next week. HENRIETTA CROS- 
MAN, in Percy MacKaye's whimsical comedy. 

ANTI-MATRIMONY. 

One hundred and fifty joyous minutes. 

Monday, August 1st— THE SPENDTHRIFT. New York's latest dra- 
matic sensation. 



Savoy Theatre 



McAllister Street, 
Above Market. 



TO-LET 



By the afternoon, evening or week, till August 1, 1910. 
Apply at theatre office daily, from 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



HOTHER WISMER, Violinist, 



Saturdays 



Will resume teaching Aug. 1st, at his residence 

2945 Fillmore Street near Union 

Berkeley. 2525 COLLEGE AVENUE 



July 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Henrietta Croamnn will continue as the attraction at lli> ■ 
Columbia Theatre for a second and last week, commencing with 
Monday night; .Tuly 25th. 

* * * 

A new play, entitled "The Spendthrift," will be presented at 
I ho Columbia Theatre for two weeks commencing Monday even- 
ing, August 1st, with the regular matinees, for the firsi time. 
"The Spendthrift" is a domestic story written along broad lines, 
with a plot built about a prosperous business man who is ruined 
by the extravagance of his wife. 

* * * 

.lames K. Hackett in "The Prisoner of Zenda" is the attraction 
announced by the Alcazar management for the coming week. It 
was as Rudolph Rassendyl that Mr. Hackett leaped into stellar 
prominence about fifteen years ago. Many of those who witnessed 
liim in the role more than a decade ago at the Baldwin Theatre 
have served to keep the great performance in San Francisco's 
memory, and its revival at the Alcazar promises to be his most 
profitable offering in that play-house. 



Annette Kellerman will make her first appearance in this city 
next Sunday matinee. Miss Kellerman is the champion swim- 
nier and diver of the world. She holds records from 100 yards 
to '26 miles, and is the only girl that ever attempted to cross 
the English Channel. She has won every race she ever entered, 
and has -defeated most of the best male swimmers in the world. 
Miss Kellerman carries two large mirrors. Her work is done in 
the spotlight, so that not a movement of the fair diver is lost, 
as she rushes up the spring-board, poises for a second and flashes 
through the air. 

Clifford & Burke will contribute a touch of minstrelsy to the 
new bill. 

The Four Cliftons, otherwise styled the "Four Hercules," will 
give exhibitions of strength. 

Harry Atkinson, the Australian Orpheus, will introduce his 
imitations of musical instruments. 

Next week will be the final one of James Thornton, the Im- 
perial Musicians, Prof. Apdale's Zoo Circus, and Edwards Davis 
and his company in "The Picture of Dorian Gray." 



The Passion Play at Oberammergau. 

Oberammergau seems to be the Mecca for most America]! tour- 
ists in Europe this season. There are more Americans visiling 
this play than people from any other section of the world, outside 
of Germany and the immediate vicinity of this Bavarian village. 
There are also more people from California at Oberammergau 
than from any other Western State. Those who witnessed the 
play ten years ago write that it has been greatly improved since 
that time. 

Ottilie Zwink, who takes the part of Mary this year, was a 
singer in the chorus ten years ago. She is the daughter of Hans 
Zwink, who has impersonated Judas during several successive 
performances. Maria Mayer, who takes the part of Mary Mag- 
dalene, was a singer in the chorus ten years ago, and is consid- 
ered by most people at, the play to be the most beautiful young 
lady in Oberammergau. 

Photographs of these peasant players have been received from 
Anton Lang bj Dr. Edwin Harvey Hadlock, of this city. They 
arc the only pictures that the authorities have permitted to be 
taken of the Passion Play this year. Dr. Hadlock will give a 
realistic production od a in an illustrated travelogue at 

Christian Science Hall on Friday evening. July 89th. The pic- 
tures will be colored in a most artistic manner, and over 125 
views will be vised to illustrate the lecture. 



BOHEMIAN CLUB CONOBBT. 

The regular after-the-jinks concert of the Bohemian Club will 
take place at the Van Ness Theatre on Tuesday afternoon, Aug. 
9th. A programme of unusual excellence will be presented, em- 
bracing selections from a number of the recent forest plays pre- 
sented at the club's open air theatre in its Grove near Guerne- 
ville. The feature of the programme will naturally be the music 
from this year's jinks: "The Cave Man." music by W. J. Mc- 
Coy, words by Charles K. Field. The orchestra will be directed 
by the various composers, including Joseph D. Redding, Edmund 
F. Schneider, G. G. Stridden and Herman Perlet. The club's 
chorus will be directed by E. D. Crandall. The concert will be 
under the general direction of the following committee of club 
members: Willard T. Barton, chairman; Joseph D. Redding, 
W. H. Leahy, John C. Wilson and Charles S. Aiken. 



It is narrated that Colonel Breckenridgc, meeting Majah 

Buffo'd on the streets of Lexington one day, asked : "What is 
the meaning, sah, of the conco'se befo' the co't house?" To 
which the Majah replied: "General Buckneh. suh, is making a 
speech. General Buckneh, suh, is a ho'n oratah." "Wliat do 
you mean by a bo'n oratah?" "If yo, or I, suh, were asked 
how much two and two make, we would reply 'foh.' When this is 
asked a bo'n oratah he replies : "When in the co'se of human 
events it becomes necessary to take an integeh of the second de- 
nomination and add it, suh, to an integeh of the same denomi- 
nation, the result, suh — and I have the science of mathematics 
to back me in my judgment — the result, suh, and I say it without 
feah of successful contradiction, suh — the result is foV That's 
a bo'n oratah." — Lyceumite. 

-James A. Patten, apropos of a failure that had an ugly 



look, said recently in New York: "That failure reminds me of 
Brownlow's boy. 'Pop,' said the boy, 'I've been reading all them 
modern society novels by Robert W. Potts about marriage bein' 
a failure, "and I want to know what it means.' 'Run along and 
play,' said old Brownlow. 'You're too young, sonny, to under- 
stand such delicate matters.' 'No, pop : I'm gettin' a big boy now,' 
said the lad, 'and I insist on knowin' all about this here social 
question. Tell me, is marriage, or ain't it, a failure?' The old 
man, after a moment's thought, replied : '"Well, if you marry a 
rich enough woman — a Gould or a Harriman — then marriage is 
as good as a failure.' " — Ex. 



She — I hope there's no truth in the report that kisses con- 
tain microbes. He — You aren't afraid to kiss me, are you? 
She — I'm not thinking of you. 1 am thinking of Fido. — Ex- 
change. 



For Dandruff and all Scalp Diseases 
HI A. F. COSGROVE 

SPECIALIST 
Diseases of the Hair and Scalp, at 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

239 POWELL STREET 



Edward H. Crump, Mayor of Memphis, praised, in a re- 
cent address, those charities that send slum children to the coun- 
try in the hot weather. "The pale, lean urchins of the slums.'' 
said Mayor Crump, "show in quaint ways how strange they arc 
to the country and its charms, '['bus a little country weeker, on 
leaving the tram at Green Willows, ran ahead of his eompanion- 
m game running back again, shouting 
fellers, come here, quick! Here's a field of 
shrimps'.' The field to which he pointed was planted in wheat. 



School of Design 

San Francisco Institute of Art „. rk H o^£ ,J i.»titiit. 

Affiliated with the Stale University 

Painting jss**^ Modeling 

Drawing (fp \\ Illustrating 

Decorative \&A) Teachers' 

Designing ^esp 7 Course 

DAY. NIGHT. aid SATURDAY CLASSES School Opens August 6 

Circulars mailed on application to the S. F. Institute o* Art. San Francisco 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910 





0&ETX 



An unconfirmed bul insistent rumor precedes the return of 
Mrs. McXutt Potter to San Francisco. From letters received 
1 1 Mm mutual friends abroad, I am informed thai Mrs. Potter 
has promised her hand to a very wealthy and middle-ag ! aer 
can who was introduced i" lier ai a fancy dress ball in Switzer- 
land. There is no doubt thai tier compatriot showered her with 
Inns, bul whether the dashing Mrs. Potter has again ven- 
tured to contemplate matrimony is a question that shi al me can 
answer — and she will not arrive in San Francisco until August 

It is an interesting coincidence that this cardiac impress 

should have been made at a bal masque for it was als lei 

similar circumstances that Lieutenant Ashtoc Potter roiced 
admiration of "Mamie" McNutt and proposed to her so 
times and so openly that almost every one ai the ball shared the 
secret. The occasion was a Mardi Grae ball at I le old Eo 

mansion. Lieut. Potter was then in the army, I as 

Bishop Potter, brought out important letters of introduction to 
all the worth whiles. He put up at the Bohemian Club 
and society put up with a greal many of his irregularities — for 
he had the exclusive New York cachet. It' met Mary McNutt 
at a tea. and his interest quickly deepened from pale Oolong i" 
good, strong English Breakfast. A few nights later the Ward! 
Gras brought out ail the pleasure loving, light-hearted people 
who were wont to dance down the twinkling hours at the Art In- 
stitute, and most lighi hearted of all was Lieutetnanl Potter — 

in fact, there were unkind people who said hi was positively lit 
up! He trailed after Mamie McNutt md proposed evei 
conversation lagged, and was refused with mock severity. But a 
few days later their engagement was announced, and a dull wag 
presented Ashton with the following: 

"Mary had a little lamb, 

Its fleece was black as ink. 
And everywhere that Mary v 

The lamb went — 1 don't think! 

'•lie followed her to the Mardi Gras, 

II. really loved her so : 
He popped the question and the corks 
Alas! his caki jas dough ! 

"Now Mary says she'll wed her lamb. 

And be his own Bo-Peep, 
Though Mrs. Grundy whispers low 

'My dear, your lamb is sheep '" 

Alter a very few years in the service, Potter resigned 

they lived abroad. Rumors i i domestic infelicity Mere confin '• 

about two years ago, when Mr . Potter, unaccompanied by her 
dashing spouse, came to make her home with lei- mother in 
San Francisco. They were divorced a little over a year igo, an I 
in the shortest possible time Potter married Mr-. Depew, a hand- 
some New York divorcee. Ruth McNutt, the young r sister of 
the two jisters, is very happily married to a Mr. Brown, a a 
aged Colorado capitalist, whom .-he met abroad while visiting 
the Potters. Virginia Jolliffe is one o!' Ruth McNutt Brown's 
intimate friends, ami lias visited her in Colorado. 
© © © 

Another engagement rumor, lacking confirmation, but m r- 
theless widely circulated, concerns thi intentions ol Mis. John 
Sroufe Merrill, the handsome widow oi ig "Johnny" Mer- 
rill, who died a couple of years ago. Since that time Mrs. 
Merrill has made her home with her mother-in-law. who i> de- 
voted to her and the little grandi augl b r. Frances. Before her 
marriage to Johnny Merrill she had earned some laurels on the 
stage, and ras singing second roles at the "id Tivoli under the 

stage name of Charlotte Beckwith. She came id' a fini I famil} 

with a heritage of beauty, and as Olive Snyder was one of the 
young favorites in Oakland joi iety. Mrs. Men ill. Sr., is >aid to 
entertain philosophical views on the subject if her daugbier-in- 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 



Beginning September 1st, 1910, 
a Table d'Hote or American plan 
dining-room will be conducted 
in addition to the 
European or a la carte 
Restaurant. 



law's re-marriage, ami would noi interfere with any plan thai 
-pilled happiness for her. Bul the young vvidou is no! quite 

-lire that she knows how to spell ii. and at present she is at 

Castle Crags with Mrs. Tiffany, of Sausalito, as her gui st. 
© © © 

An Eastern weekly prints a very absurd and amusing account 
of the economies practiced by the Peter Martins while in San 
Francisco Mrs. Peter i depicted in the role of doing light 

housekeeping in the attic of Mis. Eleanor Martin - I e. The 

background is painted in with sweeping strokes to the left a 
little kitchenette neatly lilted up with a gas stove, where Mr-. 
Peter's maid broils a chop when there are no invitations to dine 

nut : i • the righi a nir, dining i, where Mrs. Peter, slightly 

flushed from the unwonted car, ions of lighting the i ol "I lamp 
under the coffee pet. resignedly help,- herself to the sugar a- a 
saccharine compromise with skimpy life in the wild West. 

Nothing could be further I the truth, and instead of a 

true picture, the scene i- a c ic valentine. Mrs. Eleanor Mar- 
tin reserves the entire top floor of her mansion for the convenience 
of her sons. The Walter Martins and the Downey Earveys ea h 
have an apartment which they may use when thej run up to 
town. Four room- are always put in exquisi e read ne-- for the 
Peter Martin- n signify their intention of coming oui 
her", ami moreover Mrs. Eleanor Martin, who is very proud of 
Peter's marriage into the Oelrichs family, always increases her 
-tall' of servants fur their benefit. One butler suffices the I 
li"M when only Mrs. Martin ami her California connections are 
apt to be in evidence, bul the advent oi tfce New York contingent 
is the signal for a second liveried butler and two or three extra 
maid-. 

Mrs. Peter Martin ami her young -on are now- en route to 
Newport, where they will b ests of Mrs. Martin's 

Mrs. Leonard M. Thomas. Peter Martin did nol accompany 
his wife East, but instead went le i ire-en with hi- mother and 



LOS ANGELES 



B Y 



Steamer $11.50 

INCLUDING MEALS AND BERTH 

EVERY FIVE DAYS 



ALSO TO 



PORTLAND 

$15, $12 and $10 

INCLUDING MEALS AND BERTH 
Magnificent New Steamers 

BEAR, BEAVER AND ROSE CITY 



San Francisco and Portland Steamship Go. 

FLOOD BUILDING Tel. Kearny 3620 



.In.Y 88, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



brother Walter, to look after the large Oregon holdings o 

family. The Martins have a deal in Eastern Oregon whicl 

expect "ill more than reimburse them for the amount of money 

which they Bank in Downey Harvey's Ocean Shore Railroad 

scheme. 

s s » 

The English and French points of view on the subjecl of trade 
cemplified by the press notices on the marriage of Mise 
Fanny Vernon to M. Maurice Raoul-Duval, a brother of the 
Frenchman who married Beatrice Tobiii of this city. The bride 
is .i brilliant English girl,' and a sister of Lord Vernon, Firs! 
Commissioner of Works. When Beatrice Tobin married a Duval 
we were regaled with accounts of the distinguished family she 
had married into, and were asiured that he was not a fortune 
hunter, as the family was well supplied with money. The French 
journals made no mention of how this money was obtained, and 
the natural inference was, by Hie law of inheritance. But the 
English papers have been franker in their comments on the mar- 
riage of Miss Vernon and Maurice Raoul-Duval. The Duvals 
have piled up a huge fortune in the restaurant business. The 
French aristocracy counts it a disgrace to replenish a fortune 
by such means, but the English have come to regard trade as a 
natural channel for blue blood to How in; and fortune thus im- 
proved no longer impoverishes the blue blood, according to Eng- 
lish standards. 

11 will come as a surprise, however, to most San Franciscans 
lo learn that the dapper Duvals with their strings of polo ponies 
and their private cars are able to maintain these luxuries owing 
to the wise investments of Duval pere in a string of restaurants. 
The family like to have the grandchildren born on French soil, 
and Beatrice Tobin Duval has gratified that desire. But con- 
sidering that the Tobins made their money in the banking busi- 
ness, whereas the Duvals were only restaurateurs, she might have 
pushed forward her family claims to Ireland instead of France. 



COAST 60LF ASSOCIATION TO HOLD TOURNAMENT. 

Members of the various golf clubs of the Pacific Coast are 
looking forward to the coming tournament at Eotel Del Monte 
with great, interest, not only Eor the play, bul also because il is 
hoped at that time to draw ils lines closer and- effect a more 
permanent organization. Many of the clubs of Southern Cali- 
fornia and of Washington and Oregon have signified their inten- 
tion of sending their best players to participate, with an idea of 
later on the Association may be in shape to semi the winning 
leain to compete in the material tournaments which are held 
in the Easl. 

The selection of the Del Monte links on which to play the 
championship is pleasing to all. H is neutral ground and easily 
reached by the players From both North and South. The links 

themselves are among th< finest in the world, and are kept e i 

the year round. 



DRESS YOUR HAIR WELL 

The New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors at 
130 Geary, near Grant avenue, are equipped 
with all European and up-to-date appli- 
ances for Hair Dressing and Manicuring. 

MRS. A. W. FINK 

Has had extensive and varied experience 
in European and Eastern Hair Dressing Par- 
lors and has introduced many new ideas. 

SPECIAL, FOR THIS WEEK ONLY, 

Great Sacrifices in 3J and 4 ounce, 36-in. Switches 

Parisian Nail Bleach, ?3S$fiI£U. A ii »*. 

Try a course of scalp treatments by our well known 
specialist. Given by the Therapeutic System. 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK— Ten Treatments, $5.00 

New Mildred Hair Dressing Parlors 

130 GEARY STREET 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF JAMES 'WOODS 

The farthest 
advance of 
science in 
service 



Hotel Westminster 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. Fourth and Main Sts. 

American Plan Reopened. 

Rates per day, $2.SO, rooms without bath 
Rooms with bath, $3, $3.50 and $4. 

European Plan 

ll.OO per day and up. 
"With bath $1.50 and up. 

F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 



A comfortable, high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN, formerly manager of St. 

Duncan's. 



Hotel Von Dorn 

242 Turk St., San Francisco 



REMODELED AND UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



Telephones: Franklin 3666 
Home C 3666 



Hates: European $ 1 .00 and up 
American $2.50 and up 



Geo. A. Eastman. Manager 



HOTEL WINDSOR 

308-310 West 58th Street, "Wpw Ynrk 

One hundred feet from Broadway J-"CT¥ 1 vlIV 

ALBERT J. ARHOLL, Proprietor 
(Formerly of San Francisco) 

100 Suites, each with Bath. Tariff S2.50 to *10. 00 per day. 
Special arrangements by the week. In the heart of the shop- 
ping and theatrical district. Convenient to subway, elevated 
and surface car lines. Two minutes walk from Central Park. 
Cuisine unsurpassed. Service a la carte. 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 




I HOTELSAVOT 

SBATTLE 

"Tw«It* Storie* of 

Solid Co-fort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping disfLt. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, 11.50 op 




16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



§©dkH ami W®wmmdi U(§m§ 



Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear in the 
current issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 
McEnerney-Vaughn. — Miss Adelaide McEnerney, daughter of Mrs. M. A. 
McEnerney, and Ensign Sidney Vaughn, U. S. N.. of the Charleston. 
The wedding will take place in the fall. 

LUNCHEONS. 

Anglin. — After Miss Anglin's play Wednesday night, Mrs. Andrew Welch 
gave a luncheon in the brown room of the Potter Hotel, seventeen 
guests partaking of her hospitality on that occasion. The supper 
was informal in its character, and the young people thoroughly en- 
Joyed it, lingering long at table and seasoning the viands with laugh- 
ter and song and jest 

Crocker. — Miss Jennie Crocker was hostess at the Hotel St Francis on 
Monday, her guests being Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott Mrs. Peter 
Martin and Mrs. Walter Martin. 

Mottlow. — Lieutenant Mottlow entertained at luncheon at Fort Barry last 
week. 

Scott — Mrs. Lawrence I. Scott was hostess at a pretty luncheon at the 
St Francis last Wednesday, entertaining a number of Burlingame 
friends. Among them were Mis. Peter Martin, Mrs. Walter Martin, 
and Miss Jennie Crocker. 

Sullivan. — Mrs. J. F. Sullivan entertained Mrs. Edward Eberle, Mrs. 
David Clark and others last Wednesday at luncheon. 

Tobin.— Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Tobin entertained guests at an informal 
luncheon at the St. Francis on Monday. 

Wilson — Mrs. J. C. Wilson gave a luncheon at the St Francis in honor 
of Miss Virginia JollifCe last Friday. 

TEAS. 

Miner. — Mrs. Frank Miller gave a tea at her home last Thursday, the 21st. 
Prince. — Mrs. Frederick A. Prince gave a tea at the Presidio last Friday. 

DINNERS. 

Carolan. — Mr. and Mrs. Francis Carolan, who are now in Paris, recently 
entertained at dinner at the Ritz Hotel. The party afterward occu- 
pied a box at the opera. 

Colburn. — Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Colburn were hosts on Monday evening at 
the Fairmont Hotel entertaining Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Edwards, of 
Pasadena, the party afterward going to the Columbia Theatre. 

Chapin. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Chapin, of Washington, D. C, were given 
a dinner at the Fairmont Monday. 

Sullivan. — Mrs. Frances J. Sullivan entertained Mr. and Mrs. James Gar- 
neau of St Louis at a dinner last Tuesday. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
Bowles. — Miss Amy Bowles entertained a house party at her home, The 

Pines, near Oakland. 
Deering. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Peering have given a series of delightful 

house parties at their Mountain View home. 
Folger. — Mrs. J. Athearn Folger have had Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Folger at 

their country home at Woodside. 
Kohl. — Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kohl have a number of visitors at "Idlewild," 

their summer home on Lake Tahoe. Among those who are to visit 

them in August are Mrs. J. B. Crockett, Mrs. Mountford Wilson, the 

Jack Casserlys and Miss Edith Pilisbury. 
Llvermore. — Mr. and Mrs. Horatio Livermore are entertaining Miss Hazel 

King and Sydney Pringle at their Calistoga ranch. 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

Crocker. — Miss Jennie Crocker entertained a box party at the Columbia 
on Monday evening. 

Martin. — Mrs. Walter Martin had a number of her young women friends 
sharing with her the fun of the vaudeville at the Orpheum on Mon- 
day afternoon. 

ARRIVALS. 

Borel. — Mr. and Mrs. Antoine Borel have returned from Tahoe to their 
San Mateo home. 

Dohrman. — Mrs. E. A. Dohrman has returned from New York. 

Farnsworth. — Miss Laura Farnsworth has returned from Santa Barbara. 

Hanlon. — Miss Louise R. Hanlon and sister have returned from Yosemite. 

Howell. — Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Howell have returned from Webber Lake. 
They will be at the Fairmont for the summer. 

Johnson. — Mrs. Fred Johnson and cliildren have returned from Shasta 
Springs. 

Jones. — Miss Delia Jones has returned from Mendocino County. 

Kohl. — Mrs. Wm. Kohl has returned from Santa Barbara. 

Martin. — Miss Frances Martin has returned from Europe. 

MacGavln. — Mrs. Walter MacGavin has returned from Santa Barbara, 
where she had been visiting Miss Edith Pilisbury. 

Moore. — Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Moore have returned from Soutnern Califor- 
nia. They have taken a cottage at Fair Oaks for the summer. 

Rosslter. — Dr. and Mrs. P. S. Rossiter have returned from Monteclto. 

Wilshlre. — Miss Doris Wilshire, who has been visiting friends in Honoluhi, 
has returned to the city. 

DEPARTURES. 
Beaver.— Misses Kate and Ethel Beaver left Monday for a trip through 

Southern California and Mexico. 
Bourn. — Mr. and Mrs. William B. Bourn have gone to England to visit 

their daughter. 



Baldwin. — Mrs. A. P. Baldwin and Mrs. A. P. Baldwin, Jr., accompanied 

Mr. and Mrs. James Horsburgh to Tahoe. 
Bresse. — Mrs. Eugene Bresse and Miss Meta MacMahon are at Tahoe. 
Burling.— Miss Lolita Burling, after several weeks here, has returned to 

her Santa Barbara home. 
Chenery. — Mrs. Leonard Chenery, Mrs. W. Patten, Miss Edith Patten, 

Miss Dorothy Berry, are at Aetna for a few weeks. 
Casey. — Miss Ruth Casey is at Inverness, the guest of Mrs. Frederick 

Beaver. 
Cooper. — Judge and Mis. James Cooper are rusticating at Tahoe. 
Coyle. — Mrs. Marianna Coyle and her daughters, Angela and Maisie, have 

gone to Coronado. 
Davis. — Mr. and Mrs. Norris Davis have gone to Santa Barbara. 
Dibblee. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry DIbblee have gone camping. 
Farrell. — Mrs. A. Farrell and her daughter, Miss Katherine, will spend 

the remainder of the summer at Tahoe. 
Fee. — Mrs. Charles S. Fee and her three daughters are at Tahoe Tavern. 
Franklin.— Dr. Walter Scott Franklin, Mrs. Franklin and Mrs. C. M. 

Elliott have gone for a couple of weeks' hunting on the Sacramento 

river. 
Havens.— Mrs. Harold Havens and Mrs. George Kerr left last Friday for 

New York. Mrs. Havens will visit her mother, Mrs. Abbie Cheney, 

and expects to go to Europe before returning here. 
Hufschmidt. — Mr. and Mrs. George Hufschmidt and daughter, and Mr. 

and Mrs. Henry Nibbe have a cottage at Ross. 
Lund. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lund are at Tahoe. 
Lally. — Miss Lally and her sister Marion have left Santa Barbara for 

Coronado. 
Lucas. — Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Lucas have gone to Blithedale. 
Matson. — Captain and Mrs. William Matson and their daughter. Miss 

Lurline, left for Tahoe last Friday. They have Miss Wilhelmtna 

Tenny, of Honolulu, and Miss Saida Zabrinski, of New York, as 

guests. 
Pope. — Mrs. George Pope and her children are at Santa Barbara for a 

visit of several weeks. 
Russ. — Mrs. John Russ sailed from New York on the 13th for Europe, to 

be gone six months. 
Thomas. — Mrs. Wolcott Thomas has gone to San Diego to visit her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Joseph Sefton. 
Vail. — Mrs. Hugh W. Vail and Miss Nan. Vail have gone to Santa Bar- 
bara, 

MOTORING. 

Cluff.— Mrs. William Cluff and Miss Florence duff will motor to Santa 
Barbara this week. 

Dimond. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Dimond have been touring Europe the 
past four months. They will return to San Francisco at the end of 
July. 

De Laveaga. — The De Laveagas have gone to Southern California and 
Mexico for an extended motoring trip. 

Eva. — Mr. and Mrs. James Eva entertained over the week-end Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Treadwell, Miss Alice Hageman, Joseph Handlon, Thomas 
Finnegan, who motored to their summer home, "Evahurst," at Fair 
Oaks. 

Gilroy Hot Springs. — One of the most picturesque drives is along Coyote 
Creek, after leaving Gilroy to the Gilroy Hot Springs. This resort 
has been very popular this year. The cottages and the hotel are con- 
stantly filled, and many motorists are coming and going daily. The 
resort is beautifully situated, and the waters and climate are de- 
lightful. 

Mendel!. — Mrs. George Mendell and her daughter, Miss Louise Janin, 
motored to Napa Soda Springs, and will be there this week. 

Miller. — Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Is touring Southern California at present. 
She is enjoying Santa Barbara. 

Monsarrat. — Mr. and Mrs. S. Monsarrat motored to Gilroy Hot Springs 
Saturday. They were also visitors at Paraiso Springs. 

McBean. — Mr. and Mrs. Athole McBean motored last week to Tahoe. 

Polhemus. — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Polhemus took Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Mc- 
Cormick for a trip through Lake County last week, making their 
headquarters at Highland Springs. 

Pike. — Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike are In Mendocino County on their honey- 
moon trip. 

Preston. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Preston spent the week at Del Monte. They 
have Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Fellows and Miss Smith, of Los Angeles, 
as guests. They all leave for Santa Barbara in a day or two. 

Smythe. — Mrs. Mary H. Srnythe. Mr. and Mrs. L. R. D. Grubb, and Han- 
son Grubb left Sunday for Crater Lake and a trip through Oregon. 

Walter. — Mrs. I. N. Walter left last week with a party for Shasta Springs, 
where her daughter and several others will join her for a trip 
through Northern California. 

INTIMATIONS. 

Alexander. — Miss Harriet Alexander writes interesting accounts of her 
social experiences in London, where she Is the guest of Mrs. Regi- 
nald Brooke. Miss Alexander has traveled through Scotland and 
England during her stay. 

Brugulere. — Mrs. Emile Bruguiere and her son, Louis, who have been in 
Europe during the past three yeard, are residing for the summer at 
their villa Castlewood at Newport. 



Beautiful 


Willow 


Plumes 


Made from old feathers and 
boas or new material furnished 


Phone West 221 1398 O'Farrell Street 

GUARANTEE— No Fibers can be Shaken from Plumes 1 Willow. 



July 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



Bothln. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bothin will remain at Santa Barbara till 
August. 

Crocker. — Miss Jennie Crocker, who is spending the bu ier in Santa 

Barbara, is expected to return from San Francisco, where she has 
been this week. Miss Crocker went North to attend the dog show in 
which she is exhibiting several of her pets. She will return to the 
Potter next week. Templeton Crocker, who accompanied his sister 
North, returned to Santa Barbara the first of the week. 

Collins. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Collins, of Pittsburg, were guests at tho 
Palace for a few weeks. They left on Wednesday for a visit to Del 
Monte, going later to Southern California. Mrs. Collins is the daugh- 
ter of Mrs. William Thaw and sister of the Countess of Yarmouth. 

Crocker. — Miss Jennie Crocker and her brother, Templeton, are enter- 
taining the Ogden Mills, Jr., at their home, "Uplands," near Bur- 
lingame. 

Gardner. — Mrs. Herman Gardner, of Milwaukee, was at the Palace for 
several weeks, and has returned home. 

Ghlradelli. — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ghiradelli are spending a part of their 
honeymoon at Tahoe. 

Hartlgan. — Mrs. Charles Conway Hartigan (Margaret Thompson) is visit- 
ing friends at Mare Island. 

Irwin. — Mrs. Wm. G. Trwin and Miss Helene Irwin will return to San 
Francisco next week to meet Mr. Irwin on his arrival from Hono- 
lulu. 

Martin. — Mr. and Mrs. Peter Martin, who have been with Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin most of the winter, are the guests at the summer home at 
Newport of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard M. Thomas (Blanche Oelrichs.) 

Pell. — Mr. and Mrs. Osgood Pell, of New York are en route to California 
to visit the Pells of Sausalito. 

O'Neill. — Major and Mrs. O'Neill are entertaining Miss Goodhue of Walla 
Walla at their Presidio home. 

Rixford. — Dr. and Mrs. Emmet Rixford are expected home from New York 
in August. 

Schultz. — Miss Elyse Schultz is on her way home from Europe. Under 
the chaperonage of Mr. and Mrs. Wellington Gregg, she accompanied 
Miss Enid Gregg on a summer tour of Europe. 

Spreckels. — Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, who have been the last 
six weeks in Europe, sailed for home on Friday. 

Thorn. — Mrs. Thorn and the Misses Thorn are guests of Mrs. Hugo Oster- 
haus at the naval yards at Mare Island. 

Searchlight Bathing Party. — A moonlight and searchlight bathing party 
took place in front of the Casino at Santa Cruz Monday night, July 
18th. It was quite a novel affair. There were two brass bands — 
League of the Cross Cadets Band and the Santa Cruz Beach Band 
— playing a "Never a Dull Moment" concert on two bandstands. The 
meaning of "Never a Dull Moment" concert is that when one band 
finished playing the other band begins, and that continues during the 
evening. Promptly at eight-thirty, about three score of bathers 
took a dip in the bay, and with the moonlight on the water, and the 
searchlight playing upon these bathers, it was really a very beautiful 
sight. About a dozen ladies and gentlemen went to the raft, and 
as they climbed up on it in their different colored bathing suits, with 
the searchlight playing upon them, it was really a pretty sight. Indi- 
vidual swimmers were singled out, and the bay between the pier and 
the life-line was dotted with swimmers. Following is a list of a 
few of the number who were in bathing: Judge W. P. Mogan, Miss 
Pearl Makinney, Miss Helen Wright, E. R. Allen, Dr. C. J. Mogan, 
Winfleld Higgins, K. A. Marr, Mrs. Anna Hynemann, Miss Velma 
Rea, Thomas Canterill, Miss Mabel Stone, Katherine Owen, Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred W. Stanton, Keith Owen. 

Wilson. — Mrs. Russell J. Wilson is the gviest of Mrs. Joseph B. Crocketl 
at Hillsboro. 



BARBECUE AT PARA I SO SPRINGS. 

Lust Sunday a barbecue n t9 given at Paraiso Springs, in 
which ninny of the .suosls participated, besides a Dumber of 
"Watsonville boosters." as they called themselves. It was ■! 
jolly gathering, and Host McGowan was at bis svits'-end making 
300 guests happj and comfortable at the same time. The artis- 
tic grounds were redolent with lingerie. The rummer 
dresses, negligee shirts and hot summer weather mingled delight- 
fully. The barbecue was a great success. The genial Mayo 
Waters, of Watsonville, was toast master and general chef. 
Dozens of chickens were fattened for the occasion at a near-by 
farm house, a pot full of doves, the Brsl of the season, and a 
large quantity of Buffalo beer all combined lor a successful day. 

I Wat- 

sonvilie, win nil] have an annual apple exhibition from 

October 1st to 16th, to let the world know that the locality Bhips 

more apples and straw I egon and Washington 

■med. 



There is Satisfaction in dealing with 

T H F 

Waldorf Hair Store 



BEST KNOWN 



KNOWN AS THE BEST 



241-243 Geary Street 

UNION SQUARE 



You can order jusl. what you want. Get juSt exactly 
what you order without delay and at the right 
price. You can depend upon us. 

We design and manufacture all kinds of Hair Goods, 
Curls, Puffs, Switches, Waves, Pompadours, 
Fancy Chignons, Ladies' and Men's Wigs of all 
descriptions. Our good work speaks for itself. 
Expert artists in all branches of our work. 

Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Scalp and Facial Treat- 
ments; Hair Dyed and Bleached; Chiropody; Elec- 
trolysis for Removing Superfluous Hair; Mani- 
curing for gentlemen and ladies. 




H. BETTE 



Ladies Tailor 



and 



Habit Maker 



IMPORTER OF FINE NOVELTIES 

Fall Importations and styles just received. 
270 SUTTER STREET Opposite White House 



A DAINTY TOILET ARTICLE. 

Kvery lady who desires to keep up her attractive appearance, while at 

the theatre, attending receptions, when shopping, while traveling and on 

sions should carry in her purse a booklet of Gouraud's Oriental 

Beauty Leaves. This is a dainty littie booklet >>( exquisitely perfumed 

iy removed and applied to the skin. It is 

Invaluable when thi nd iinsih-d. and is far superior 

t.. a powder puff, as it does not spill and soil the clothes. It removes 

dirt, soot and grease from the face, imparting a cool, delicate bloom to 

il-l.xion. Sent anywhere on receipt of Five Cents in stamps or 

coin, P. T. Hopkins, 37 Great Jones St.. New York. 



Go to Headquarters 

BATHING SUITS 

Sweater Coats Summer Underwear 

•WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 




Cor. Grant Ave. and Post Sis. 



J{m#g@ L®wS@ir m& ftlto® GoDkgllasir IFomninHy 



GASEYGBAMS. 

The wheels of Justice move slowly even when well greased. 

The limn who gi i grafter; the wan who gets 

away wit a bundle is a finant i< r. 

The lull's! soft drink in Reno is called the Jeffries Punch. 

Jl is perfectly harml 

Thi cast av Big Jim shows tlud a man can't come bank. 



"Casey," said Mrs. Casey, "the law is a noble profession, ain't 

it?" 

"My dear woman," i I ist upon a nine, accord- 

ing to history, there were two min who engaged in an argumeni 
about a calf. Each wan av thim made claim thai he bad raised 
it on the bottle, and would know its hide in a Ian yard, and thin, 
after they had Eound * ; to admit anny knowl- 

edge av either wan av thim, thej imployed lawyers and started a 
fight. Wit 3 _ wan a\ thim presinted bis 

i ase, and thin, when thej m - < mat tei over fer a 

reasonable time, from a li - point, the calf died av old 

age, the cas only people "I lade annything 

out av it wen er who baud grown old while ingaged in 

it. and retired from business on the ney they bad in... 

av the calf."' 

•'I've heard that thei tieap of delaj conn .1 witf tb' 

-,..ii." declared Mrs. Casey, "bin I didn't know it was as 
bud as all that." 

■•It's worse than that even," n plied Casey. "Only the other 
day in Judge Lawlor's court wan av thim famous graft cases 

appeared long enough to eal lip - mure av the tax payers' 

money, and the usual result was what took place. F'r some 
unknown reason the whole Gallagher family wuv called into 

court. Witf great fidelity av detail and much wisdom apparent, 
the Judge indivored to ascertain wb.u plans wen held by Big 
Jim, and after a very extensive and expert course a\ questioning, 
he found that nobody knew annything at all." 

"Quite a creditable result," said Mrs. Casey: "but why are 
so hot after him?" 

"In me opinion. Mrs. < lasey," was the answer, "the whole thing 
is a huge joke. There is no e\ idence wit' Jim Gallagher or with- 
out Jim Gallagher to prove that all the male population av San 
Francisco is strangled by graft. From the first start, whin 
Frank Bftaynej promised to pui all the qualified voters ai thi 
town who were a ri hanging on to the coat-tails av Spreckels and 
Phelan into jail. - been neithei sense nor decency con- 

nected wit 5 the affair. And the way the people's mom 
wasted in Judge Lawlor's court last Saturday is only a fair sam- 
ple av the waj the graft cases have bei d handled since they first 
began. Witf gri nity the intire Gallagher family ap- 

peared in reBponsi to a subpinny, and the conversation that in- 
sued was of a bighbj inst ; exl reme. 

•■ 'D' y" know annything aboul B \ says the court to 

I{oy Gallagher, whin he had seated himself and pri | I : 

worst. 

"'Th' last J heard av him.' says Jioy. 'he'd gone back to the 

alfalfa ranch f'r a little visit, and thin he immediately set out for 
a hunting trip up in the mountains, bu; I don't know wh 
went.' 

"'Air have v' annv Ldj he •■ ill ever come 

back?' 

" THy dear Judge,' says Uo}', 'up to the last momem thi betting 
was tin to six that he would, but he did not, and I do not think 
he ever will.' 

'• 'Wlio are vou talkn annyway? 

" 'Who are you talking about y. u: ■ - Roy. 

"'None e)' your sass, ! says the court. 'I am inquiring al I 

the present location, habitation, residence, domicile, dwelling 
place, or home station of your well-known brother Jim; now 
don't get fresh.' 

'■•My dear ju.' 80 . 'his whereabouts are uncertain 
and liable to grow more so, and his intentions are to keep as far 
away from Iron- an. Whin be resided here he was be- 
tween the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea. Whin he stayed ' e 

in the evening, the front porch of his house was blown off, and 
whin he roamed forth, his solitude was invaded by detectives who 



wanted him to tell the history av his life. And finally he made 
up his mind that peace was better than great prominence, and 
lie withdrew in a quiet and inoffensive way, and departed to 
parts unknown. I don't know where he is. 1 don't want to know 
where he is, and I couldn't know where he was if I wanted to, 
for the letters he writes to me fail to state either the latitude or 
the longitude, and besides, I tear them lip immediately whin I 
have read thim, so thai nobody will find out.' 

"'Step down,' says the court. 'Mr. Sheriff, shoot up th' next 
witness, and I. i's see it he is as cute as the wan who lias just said 
his little pi. ■ 1 .' 

"'Tom Gallagher at th' bal,' says the Sheriff. 'Bob Gallagher 
on deck. 5 

•• 'What's y'r name,' says th' court, 'and what do y' know, if 
annything, about Big .Mm V 

" 'Y' Honor.' say- the witness, 'me name is Thomas Gallagher, 
alias Norval. On th' Grampian Hill- me father was a sheep- 
man before the cattle-men ran him out av the country. And I 
think Big Jim is a dub. I lost wan week's wages on him. He 
had eol.l feet in the first inning, and a crippled hilly-goat would 
have put him down for the count iii the li 

•••I think -o mesilf,' -ays ih" Judge, 'but while I coincide wit" 

y" in y'r 1 -i ; ■■ im, I am «f erring to Jim Jeffries ; it's 

Jim Gallagher I mean ; d" y' know annything about him.' 

" 'My .bar Judge,' says th' witness, 'I have always had a great 
deal av respect Eor Jim. He is a wise man. He can duck trouble 
wit" consistent determination and continue doing so witf great 
ease. He confines himself strictly to business, and he has no 
desire to meddle in the affairs ai bthet people in annywaj al all. 
He is also av a very retiring disposition. He retires to bed every 
night. But he is somewhat inclined to be nervous, li annoys 
him whinever people blow out the front av the house witf dinny- 
mite bombs. A- to his whereabouts, I don't think he wears thim, 
but his intentions arc pur.!. :r. a personal character, and he 
allows nobody to participate in thim, for all I know.' 

"'Mr. Sheriff/ says the court, 'did you understand annything 
that the « it ue— .11 tempted to say?' 

" Ale private opinion abonl the matter,' says the sheriff, 'is 1 b n 



TAKE A 

VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

TO THE COUNTRY WITH YOU 
VICTORS from $10 to S100 on the Easiest Terms 

From our 100,000 Records you and your friends can be 
entertained at a moment's notice by foremost bands, the 
greatest opera artists, "funny comedians, sweet singers, and 
all kinds of clever people — take along all the latest song hits 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

Sleinwiy and Other Pianos. 

Player Pianos of All Grades Viclor Talkinc Machine* 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS. OAKLAND 



Ask For 

Black 



WHITE 

WHISKEY 

IT IS THE BEST 

None Bottled in America 



§COTCH 



July 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



he <l<>n't know anny more about Jim Gallagher than I do, but he 

. ln'1 tell y' annytbing about him if he did.' 

"'Come on up on the perch here whoever is the oexl «i 

that don't know annytbing,' says the judge, 'and Btal i j 'r Dame.' 

•••[lull Qallagbir. y'r Honor." sivs the witness. 

••'What's y'r full Dame?' .says the court. 

•••I have greai respect for th J position which f attempt to 
occupy but fail to adorn, 1 ' says the witness, 'and I have no lull 
name I'm a Knight av Father Matthew, if y' want to know. 
Liquor is a curse. The man who grapples wit' corn juice ends up 

by finding alligators in his hoots. The alcoholic contents a\ ilf 

social glass destroys the brain, benumbs the wits, projuees boa 

constrictors from the imply air and sometimes even makes a 
man see pink and purple-colored mules. My limit is a social 
glass a\ steam whin nobody is lookin'.' 

" 'L don't blame Y f'r that,' says th/' judge; 'ivory man gets 
laid out on a bier in th' ind, but have y' a brother Jim?' 

" 'I have a brother Jim, and a brother Roy, and a brother Tom 
and manny other relatives besides y'r Honor,' says th' witness. 
'I'll name thim over for y' if y' want.' 

"'Big Jim is the only want, that interests me anny,' says th' 
court.' 

" 'He ain't nearly as interesting as be was before the Fourth av 
July.' says th' witness; 'whin Jack Johnson (touted him on the 
jaw, he dimmed his star av destiny and proved tlv inefficiency av 
I lie white race f'r all time to come.' 

" 'Whin was the last letter y' bad from y'r brother Jimmy?' 
says the court. 

" "According to me best recollection," says the witness, 'this 
is the proper place for me to lose me mimory. I have forgot. I 
never have received anny, and 1 forget when the last wan came.' 

" 'Where was he whin he wrote the letter which y' didn't get?' 
says th' court. 

"'It was postmarked at Vancouver in the domain av th' new 
King, George. The climate there is grand. There is a notice- 
able absence av anny laws finding to the extradition av witnesses 
there.' 

" 'Quite a secluded place, ain't it ?' says the court. T sh'd im- 
agine that a man could be contintcd there.' 

"T am quite convinced that Jim is well contint there,' says 
the witness. 'He has no court to pull him away from his business 
ami ask him foolish questions. Tin' froni porch av bis house is 
not blown off every night, ami the process Bervers are unable 
In approach him wit' subpinnys requiring him to come to court 
or be forever damned.' 

"'Mr. Sheriff,' says the court, 'arise immejitly and holler oul 
'Oyez,' and thin adjourn ibis bloody court ; il's almost time Eor 
the umpire to call the ball game, and I hate to miss (be starting 
av it in anny way." " 

"And thin?" said Mrs, Casey. 

"And thin," said Casey, "the court adjourned." 

"But why did the judge ask so manny foolish questions not 
relating to iinnything al all?" inquired Mrs. Casey. 

"My dear woman, said her husband, "the science av Lam is 

a highly intricate thing. By his astute method av oviminn 

the court was indeavoring to trap the witness into saying some- 
thing thai he did not waul to say. Bui he bad no chance from 
the start, and the hopeless i which he made only pile up 

costs on the tai payer, the machinery av the courts, keep 

cases from being tried that really ought I d, and keep 

business from picking up as it should. Business is bad 
already, if annybo uld ash you about it. The firm a\ 

Spreckels, Phelan and others lias done all it could to make il 
worse." 

"I ain't anny too fond av thim Spreckelses meself." said Mr-. 
Casey. 

"They ain't anny too fond av thimselves," said Casey, "judg- 
ing In the way the,- litigate, and the opinion that the ,r 
members a\ the family have of one another are in my opinion 

justifiable and 



CAMP CURRY, 



Santa Cruz 

Mountains 



A Hotel in Tents on the American Plan 

Rates: One in tent. 110 per week. Two in tent, each, fa per week 

Above conditions, ISO anJ US tor 4 weeks 

Circulars at all Southern Pacific offices ani 
Peck-JuJah Information Bureau ?So Market St. 

LEONARD H. BROWN. DAVID A iTRRY. Proprietors Crop Curry 

Permanent Address: PALO ALTO. Cal. Summer Address: LOS GATOS. Cal. 



Miss Harker's School, 



PALO ALTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year begins August 15th. 
Catalogue upon application. 



PALO ALTO 
CAL. 



Manzanita Hall 

A home school for boys desiring a thorough prepralion for college. Lack 
of rigid classification makes for rapid advancement. Location adjacent to 
Stanford University permits unusual advantages. Ample facilities for all athletic 
sports. Eighteenth year opens August 30th. Send for illustrated catalogue- 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master 



California Conservatory of Music 

Largest School of Music on the Pacific Coast. 
Georg Kruger, Piano; Herman Perlet, Orchestration and Oper- 
atic Repertoire; Dr. Stewart, Organ and Harmony; Louis E. Senoe- 
niger. Violin; Georg Walcker, Voice, and twenty other experienced 
teachers. 

Miss J. StuarL Noble, of New York, will introduce the Dunning 
Method of Improved Music Study tor beginners. 

Write for new catalog and list of free scholarships. 

147 PRESIDIO AVE., SAN FRANCISCO. 



IRVING INSTITUTE 

BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 
Thirty-first year opens August 1st. 

New departments this year; Domestic Science, Bookkeeping, 
Shorthand. Musical Kindergarten. 
Send for new catalogue. 

MISS PINKHAM, Principal. 147 Presidio Avenue. 



THE LYCEUM 

2590 Pine St., prepares for University or any examination. Its 
eighteenth year begins on July 26, 1910. Attend this school, which 
prepared hundreds successfully. < >ur instruction is the best; our 
time of preparation the shortest; our reduced tuition the lowest, 
and within reach of every one. Day and evening sessions. r,. II. 
Grau. Ph. D., Principal. 



Miss Head's School for Girls 

BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Reopens August 16, 1910 Mary E. Wilson, Principal 



A. W. BeiSt 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 




1910 Style 



CURTAZ 
PIANO 



Incomparably better than any other io its clan 
A Little Lower Priced Tbaa the Others 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

113-117 Kearny Street near Poat 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of perfumed pomlen 

arr j- jn the parse- a band] My Im- 

. Tits in stan 

N" Y 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



Ik fiUne IP@IttncaiS AireiM 



So far as the situation in the Re- 
Insdegenct not so Bad. publican party is concerned, it is 

apparent that peace and harmony 
will soon prevail, and that the Congressional campaign will be 
conducted the country over with the usual vim and energy. This 
happy state of things has been brought about by visits to Oyster 
Bay by so-called insurgents and regulars, who discussed the af- 
fairs of the party with Colonel Roosevelt. It did not take the 
former President long to discover that the disaffection in the 
party had been greatly exaggerated, and that the leaders were as 
closely united as ever they were, only that certain policies that 
President Taft had adopted had not appealed to some Congress- 
men, and many of the rank and fde, as reflecting the economic 
principles of (he party, notably the Payne-Aldrich tariff, which 
was vigorously opposed, and which opposition was unwisely and 
really untruthfully charged with disloyalty to the party. 

Mr. Roosevelt was not slow to see from what his distinguished 
visitors said that in all the really essential items of President 
Taft's legislative program the administration had been fully 
sustained by the Republican majority in Congress, and that no 
opposition of consequence developed until it was discovered thai 
the President looked with favor upon the Payne-Aldrich meas- 
ure. Then it was that a vigorous opposition to the "program" 
was developed. Colonel Roosevelt did not have to be told by 
Senator Beveridge or any other insurgent that the insurgency 
was nothing more nor less than the legitimate consequence of 
standing firm and steadfast upon President Roosevelt's own 
recommendation; to wit, that the Dingley tariff schedule should 
be subjected to a downward revision, but which was subjected 
to an upward revision by the new schedules, which had Presi- 
dent Taft's endorsement. That being the real and only cause 
of the insurgency, Colonel Roosevelt could not help thinking 
kindly of the Congressmen who had gone so far as to oppose the 
President to uphold his own tariff policy, the more so because 
the former President has known all along that the country is 
with him heart and soul in his stand of a downward revision 
of the Dingley tariff, first because there is no longer need of such 
high protection, and, second, because it is the power that makes 
industrial trusts and monopolies possible by preventing legiti- 
mate competition. 



It is claimed that the good people of San Francisco, while 

a useful auxiliary in promoting good Government, being in the 
minority, should no more be looked upon as an indisputable 
necessity to its success than a dog's tail is to be considered neces- 
sary to that creature's progress. Although it may appear so to 
some, the tail is not what pushes the dog along, and never was 
there a canine, nor combination of canines, so foolish as to de- 
pend upon the intelligence and exertion of their caudal appen- 
dages for the accomplishment of any such purpose. This being 
true, it is as difficult to comprehend the success of the "minority" 
in this movement for the establishment of a better moral tone 
as it is to comprehend the logic which convinces some officials 
that, because their tongues and heads inordinately wag, their tails 
should be capable of doing the thinking. Perhaps, after all, it is 
not the minority. 



Some inspired scribbler tells us, "It is the misfortune of 

San Francisco that all well-intended enterprise for municipal 
improvement is ever assailed by gentlemen who talk too freely 
after a casual study." And the most discouraging phase of the 
situation exists in the certainty that so long as the immortal race 
of fools shall remain vigorous with undiminished numbers and 
unimpaired confidence, this condition may be expected to prevail. 



The Gubernatorial discussion seems to have reached that 

eacophonic stage which, like many political arguments, closely 
resembles a barnyard concert. The American says, "Where am 
I at?" and in England they say, "Where is me 'at?" Both re- 
marks indicate the same state of mind, and simply illustrate that 
much of the prevailing local political argument, if properly in- 
terpreted, might be discovered to embrace a like scope of har- 
mony. 



VOTE FOR 



C. D. DORN 

FOR 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

For Republican Nomination Primary Election 



A. T. BARNETT 

Republican Candidate For 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 



CARL W. MUELLER 

Candidate For 
REGULAR REPUBLICAN NOMINATION FOR 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

INCUMBENT 



Charles E. A. Creighton 

FOR THE 
REPUBLICAN NOMINATION FOR 

Justice of the Peace 



For JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

BERNARD J. FLOOD 

(Incumbent) 
Presiding Justice Seeking Republican Nomination 



William P. Caubu 

for 
Republican Nomination 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

Present Assistant District Attorney 



W. H. SMITH, Jr. 

FOR JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

Republican and Incumbent 



SAMUEL B. RUSSELL 

FOR 

Justice of the Peace 

Republican Ticket 



July 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



CALHOUN ASKS FOR WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS. 

The Supreme Court now has an opportunity to clear the many 
farces upon the Superior Court calendar. There is no evidence 
and no possibility of conviction of the United Railway officials. 
San Francisco is suffering, and has suffered for many months, 
by the action of private individuals seeking revenge. The in- 
dictments secured were not in the interest of the public at large, 
although the District Attorney's office and public funds were used 
to further the political designs of the Phelan-Spreckels bunch. 
The following is an excerpt from a statement prepared for Pat- 
rick Calhoun in his fight for final freedom : 

'•'When February 1, 1908, arrived, it was made apparent that 
Mr. Calhoun was to have no trial in that month nor for many 
months thereafter. In fact, he was refused a trial throughout 
the whole of the year 1908, although he demanded it on over 
thirty different occasions. The only trial of a United Railroads 
official in 1908 was that of Tirey L. Ford, who was put upon trial 
a third time from April 9, 1908, to May 2, 1908, with the result 
that the jury for a second time returned a verdict of not guilty. 

"So that throughout the year 1908 Mr. Calhoun was required 
to be in constant attendance at court, but without trial. The 
continuances of his case were for short spaces of time, so that 
he was not at liberty to undertake any business affair which would 
or might require his time for a period of weeks. On the con- 
trary, he was required to go to court several times a month with- 
out knowing from week to week whether he would or would not 
be given a trial, each time again to see his trial postponed and 
nothing more. 

"This system of depriving him of his liberty and destroying 
his power to give consecutive attention to his affairs, and the 
affairs of others intrusted to him, was pursued from February, 
1908, until January, 1909." 

Mr. Calhoun maintains that his right to a trial has been tram- 
pled on many times in the lower court, and that the Penal Code 
provides that a defendant cannot be kept without a trial for a 
longer period than sixty days. Patrick Calhoun's liberty is re- 
stricted to the city and county limits. He has applied to the 
Supreme Court for a writ of habeas corpus, and asked to be ad- 
mitted to bail in the meantime. 

The writ was issued, returnable next Monday, and Calhoun 
was admitted to bail in the sum of $150,000, after Presiding 
Judge Van Nostrand of the Superior Court had approved of the 
bonds furnished by Henry T. Scott and William H. Crocker. 
Calhoun had surrendered himself to Sheriff Thomas Finn 
having sworn to his petition before Notary Public Charles Hol- 
ton. 



Dr. A. M. Worthington, of Harvard, has announced wit- 
tily to the world that the "kiss germ*' is a myth. Apropos of 
this happy announcement, Dr. Worthington said at a dinner in 
Boston: "So they who frown on the kiss are too exclusive. They 
are, in fact, as bad as old Dr. Thompson, of Cambridge Univer- 
sity. Dr. Thompson thought that Cambridge was the finest uni- 
versity in the world. Her rival, Oxford, he despised and abomi- 
nated. Once at a dinner a lady said to (he exclusive old man: 
'I understand, sir, that the attendance at Oxford has fallen off 
tremendously. How do you account for it, sir?' 'It must be 
due,' said Dr. Thompson] gruffly, 'to the increase of emigration 
among the lower classes.' " — Ex. 

The following party from the U. S. Battleship "West Vir- 
ginia" were at SkaggS 5 Hot Springs last week: Win. Donohue. A. 
A. "Martin. Harry Legge, D. J. Fowler, J. L. Wettengel, Jas. 
Kelly, A. MeWhirter, W. L. English. D. O'Connell, F. F 
Ion. 



HENRY A. MELVIN 

(Incumbentt 
Seeking Republican Nomination for 

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court 



MISTAKEN FOR TEDDY, JR. 

A. P. Miller, a young capitalist of Buffalo, and his pretty 

bride, who are at the Palace on their I ymoon trip, are having 

more trouble than a bridal couple should have. From New York 
in San Francisco the two have been mistaken for "Teddy Roose- 
velt, Jr., and his bride," and have suffered the consequences in 
the way of dodging photographers and refusing invitations, and 
explaining they are not traveling under an assumed name, as 
Miller is the name that is really and truly theirs. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miller were married in New York the same day as were "Teddy" 
Jr., and Miss Alexander. They boarded the same train for the 
West as did the son of the ex-president and his bride, and thus 
came the mix-up. In addition to these few stated facts, young 
Miller looks enough like young Roosevelt to be Kermit himself. 
As far as signing another name on the register is concerned, was 
it not telegraphed broadcast that "Teddy," Jr., and his wife were 
traveling incog. ? 

When the two arrived at the Palace, they were immediately 
"recognized" by several of the wiseacre reporters, and young 
Miller, in despair, sought the room clerk and implored help. Af- 
ter telling his story, he begged that he and his bride be allowed 
to enjoy their wedding trip without further annoyance. The re- 
quest would probably not have been granted, so far as snap- 
shot fiends and would-be entertainers are concerned, were it not 
for the fact that the newspapers next day announced that the 
real bona fide "Teddy" is at present in Santa Barbara. Mr. and 
Mrs. Miller, however, are making a long stay at the Palace. 



A THOUGHTFUL PARTING GIFT. 

An appropriately decorated Bon Voyage Box filled with delicious can- 
dies. At any of Geo. Haas & Sons' four stores: Phelan Building; Fill- 
more at Ellis; Van Ness at Sutter; and 28 Market street, near Ferry. 



George H. Bahrs 

Candidate for 

JUDGE OF SUPERIOR COURT 

Solicits Your Support 



Your Vote is Solicited for 



FRANKLIN P. BULL 



Republican Candidate For 

SUPERIOR JUDGE 



FOR 



JUDGE OF SUPERIOR COURT 

JAS. M. TROUTT 



REPUBLICAN 

(Incumbent! 



REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE 

H. D. LOVELAND 

For RAILROAD COMMISSIONER 

2d District 

(INCUMBENT) 



FOR 

STATE SENATOR 

22d Senatorial District 
Comprising the 39th and 40th Assembly Districts 

John J. Cassidy 

(REPUBLICAN) 



33 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 33, 1910. 




Easteenehs Toubing 

thi; Oil Fields. 



Jack Men-ill. personally conducting 
the $100,000,000 party of capitalists 
who are now en come to the lower 
vaDey and "il fields, while in Los 
Angeles last week had the following to say: "The people are all 
from 'Mi.-souri' — they must be shown. It is impossible 
\rv samples to the buyer, so we are bringing the buyers to the 
sample-." 

The party is now in Bakersfield, from where it will make trips 
mil to Maricopa and the Midway field. Those in the partj are 
Messrs. Nicholas H. Colwell, Hector H. Hetchings, Prank Eng- 
lish, John V. Dunne, Alfred G. Hohn, Berber! S. Einstein, E. 
t'. Rowe, George W. Samiger, John Tevis, E. McKeman, De 
Witt Smith. Paul de Montcalm, William R. Garrison, A. G. 
Drake, Jack Merrill, Harold Smith and C. M, McMurrin, all of 
New York, and G. A. Burgess ol Rochester, N. Y. 

Mr. Merrill talked interestingly of the presenl trip to the Cali- 
fornia oil li> I'l- : 

"A greai international oil era is on us. 1 believe," he said, 
"which will break before fall is over, nod I mean to have the 
Eastern investors so thoroughly informed regarding California 
oil fields by that rime thai they cannot go astray. We ha 
ial magazine writers, financial editors, illustrators and biff finan- 
cial men along, and what they ean'l find out will have been very 
carefully covered up before we gol thi re. We are going to dig 
to the bottom of things, however. 1 shall keep my private ear 
Imsv for the next ninety days running between the East, carrying 
special parties from Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston and other 
financial centers, and before I have finished, I guess the Cali- 
fornia oil fields wili be about the besl advertised and best liked 
investment proposition that we have in the country to-day. You 
■ in n or may net know it. hut yon have a wonderful re- 
source here, and you are focusing the attention of the entire 
world on yourselves. Look out for what is going to happen in 

the next four nr live months." 



Well grounded reports from Ba 
Baxeksfield Oil Fields, field are to the effect that the Lake- 
view well, section 35-12-34, which 
has astonished the world by gushing for about l'.'i days at the 
average rate of probably 45,000 barrel- per day, suddenly 

I to the rate of 16,000 barrels peT day, and water 
to come up with the oil in quantities variously estimated at from 
2 to 3 per cent. This is not only the first big sign of stopping 
ii- marvelous ;_ r ait that this well ha- -hown. but it is also the 

first time that any water has c tip with the oil. The 

has led to speculation as to whether this is a premonitoi 

thai the phenomenon is about to cease its r rd-breakin§ 

formance, which has put out mill o arrele of oil, now stand- 
ing about the well in lakes and pool- COVI ring acres. The lion of 

16, i barrels i- only half of Hie -i conservative estimate of 

what the well was doing a few days ago. The reported change 

in the performance of ell may mark that for which the 
oil men of this State have been waiting since a few days afti 
the coming in of the great geyser was known. How long can it 
i thai pace has been a very interesting and much discussed 
question. It has been known that the life of such a How must 
be limited, but I he m I] has ie in breaking p Is at such 

a rale that no one iias known just what to expect next. The 

l.akevicw ha- presented a problem in transportation of oil which 

is yet in the throes of being solved, and which presents a very 

knotty problem to the Onion Oil Company, owner oi the i - 

trolling interest in the geyser. Thai concern, for one, would not 
he at all sorrv 10 see the big fellow doing a Eew thousand less 
than ii has formerly. 



Following the police thai has made 
AOQTJllUMi On. Lands. the "reatnes- of the Standard Oil 

Company, the Pai la Pacific Oil 

i ompany is acquiring east tracts of oil acreage in this Stale, and 
thus getting possession of properties of enormous ultimate value. 



in advance of development. This policy is so sound thai ii 
scarcely needs explanation. By sending out experts to examine 
lands in various parts of the State, 'he company gets inside in- 
formation id' land- that are undoubtedly oil-bearing. These it 
then quietly buys up at low figures, the holders not appreciating 
the value of oil, and not foreseeing the great future of the oil 
industry in California. Among the valuable holdings of the 
Panama Pacific Company are these in the so-called "Tide-water 
Oil Belt," in San Luis Obispo and Monterey Counties, which 
have been pronounced by experts to be the coming greal oil pro- 
ducing fields in the State. Such acreage multiplies rapidly in 
value, and there can be no better speculative proposition to place 
before investors. The formation in these fields is the same as 
thai found at Santa .Maria and Coalinga. The company deals 
al -i exclusively in land and leases, letting those who subse- 
quently acquire the land al vastly enhanced prices do the de- 
veloping. Drilling aow in progress shows the character oi 
lands, and the ablest petroleum geologists have pronounced them 
as being little less than wonderful. 



Continued good reports come in fr the properties of 

the I'ajaro Valley Oil Company, which comprise 1170 acres, a 
pan of the original Salsipucdes Rancho, aboul six miles to the 
northward of Watsonville. The mountains of thi- region 
to the Tertiary ami Cretaceous systems, the Tertiary strata being 

composed chief!} oi' shales, sandstone and - i gravels. The 

shales vary from agillaceous to arenaceous. The sandst carries 

more or less clay in places, and free from impurities in others. 

Carbonaceous shale is found, and exposures showing a blue sand 
from which a superior light oil was distilled, arc traceable for 

praetieally three miles along the lii - 



The Big Panochi i^ 1 Company is busil] developing its 

valuable properties in San Benito County, which are 

daily evidence of being a. ng the richest in the State. The 

oil produced is of high gravity, ami the loci a of the well, ; s 

c ■■ nienl to market, insuring big profits. The Onion Oil Com- 
pany lias four wells on adjoining sei i des large oil land 
holdings. Every one competent to form in o - on, who 
has seen the Big Panoche properties, i- enthusi r them. 
On Kin acres of land belonging to the company there are live 
proven wells of high gravity oil. 



BON VOYAGE BOXES. 



Appropriate gifts to friends starting on a lourney. Boi 

with railroad and Steal At al] four 

of Geo. Haas & Son- storei Phelan Bull. lie-- Fillmore at Rllis; Van Ness 
at Sutter; and 28 Market street, near Perry. 



Privue Wire -New York. Chicago 



Western Union Code 



J. C. WILSON 



( New York Slock Exchange 
Member I Chicago Board of Trade 

' The Slock and Bond Exchange. S. F. 



Main Office 
MILLS BUILDING 
Sao Francisco 

Correspondents 
HARRIS. WINTHROP & CO. 
New York. Chicago, London and Pari 



Branch Offices 

PALACE HOTEL 

(Main Corridor) San Francisco 

HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



MORE THAN 



5% 



The increased cost of living has made it necessary for 
the investor to seek a larger return on his money 
To meet this demand we have a carefully prepared 
list of bonds yielding a high rate and affording perfect 
SAFETY OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST 
Write for our Circular 
SUTRO & CO., 412 Montgomery Si, Saj Francisco 



THE OIL BOOK An Authority on California Oil 

A Weekly Publication Devoted to the Oil Industry 
Mailed free upon request. 

LINCOLN MORTGAGE AND LOAN COMPANY 

14th and 15th Floors 166 Geary Street, Ssn Francisco, Csl. 
New York Seattle Los Angeles 



.Ii cs 23, L910. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



G@@<sl IR®a<als 



i;-i Congressman William Sdi/zer, of \i.« Vuuk. 

One of the greatest and most important conventions ever held 

in this country will be the Third National G I Roads Congress, 

which has been called l>\ the National Good Roads Association 
to meel al Niagara Falls, N. V.. July 28, 29, and 30, 1910. The 
appointment of delegates is invited by the officials of every 
State, county and city of the United States, and by every agri- 
cultural, automobile, commercial, educational, good mails, indus- 
trial, labor transportation, and woman's organization in such 
number as each may determine. * * * Good roads mean pro- 
gress and prosperity, a benefit to the people who live in the cities, 
an advantage I" the people who live in the country, and it will 
help even section of our vasi domain. Good roads, like good 
streets, make habitation along them mosl desirable; they enhance 
the value of farm lands, facilitate transportation, and add untold 
wealth to the producers and consumers of the country: they are 
the milestones marking the advance of civilization; they econo- 
mize time, give labor a lift, and make millions in money; they 
save "ear and tear and worry and waste; they beautify the coun- 
try — bring in touch with the city; they aid the serial and the re- 
ligious and the educational and the industrial progress of the 
people; they make better homes anil happier hearthstones; they 
are the avenues of trade, the highways of commerce, the mail 
routes of information, and the agencies of speedy communica- 
tion; they mean the economical transportation of marketable 
products — the maximum burden at the minimum cost: they are 
the ligaments that bind the country together in thrift and in- 
dustry and intelligence and patriotism; they promote social in' 
tercourse, prevent intellectual stagnation, and increase the hap- 
piness and the prosperity of our producing masses; they contrib- 
ute to the glory of the country, give employment to our idle 
workmen, distribute the necessaries of life — the products of the 
fields and the forests and the factories — encourage energy and 
husbandry, inculcate love for our scenic wonders, and make man- 
kind better and broader and greater and grander. 

The plain people of the land are familiar with the (ruths of 
history. They know the past. They realize that often the differ- 
ence between good r Is and had roads is the difference between 

profit and loss. Good roads have a monej value Ear beyond our 
ordinary conception. Bad roads constitute our greatest drawback 
to internal development and material progress. Good roads mean 
prosperous farmers; bad mads mean abandoned farms, sparsely 
settled country districts, and congested populated cities, where 

the | ■ are destined to become poorer. Good mads mean more 

cultivated farms and cheaper food products Eor the toilers in the 

towns; bad roads mean peer transportation, lack of communica- 
tion, high prices for the necessaries of life, the loss of untold 
millions if wealth, ami idle workmen seeking employment. Good 
mails wil] help those who cultivate the soil and feed the multi- 
tude, and whatever aidi the prod rs and the tanners of our 

country will increas ir wealth and our greatness and benefit 

all the people. We ran noi destroy '<uv farms without final de- 
cay. They are In-, lav the heart of our national life and the 

chief source ei imr material greatness. Tear down every edifice 
in our cities and laboT will rebuild them, bul abandon the farms 
and our cities w ill disappear fo 
One of the crying needs in this country, especially in the 

South and West, : - ! roads 

would in a -icai mi i- solvi the question of the high pi 

food and (he increasing cost ,,( living. By reducing the cos! of 
transportation il would enable the farmer to market his product 

at a lower ■ and al a larger profit at the same nine. [1 

would ther and in touch with the 

centra acilitating the commerce of ideas 

if material 

When the agricultural production alone of the United 9 
for the past eleven yes 

the imagination, and il -'St more to take this product from the 
farm to the railway station than from such station to the Ameri- 
can and European markets, ami when the saving in cos! of mov- 
oduct of agriculture over good highways instead of bad 
would have buill a million mil roads, the incalculable 

waste of bad roads in - •[ slK ' h en """ 

mous proportion mand immediate reformation and the 

smanship; ° trans- 

mercantile, industrial and fanning interests, incom- 



tO tile Won 

..ml the social lite, a mal er a- im] ant as civilization itself. 

flic truth of t lie declai at H i i ,. a Sumner t ; I 

bat "I • : ati .-i forces for the a. ha men! of civil 

are the schoolmaster and good mads." is emphasized bj the ex- 
perience of the intervening years and points to the wisdom of a 

urn if the educational, commercial, transportation, and indu 

trial interests of our country in aggressive action for permanent 
l^ood mails. 



GREAT CELEBRATION SEPTEMBER 9TH. 

The Native Sons nf California are making ureal prepara- 
tions for the coming celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of 
the entrance of California into the new completed sisterhood of 
states. On the eighth, ninth and tenth of September a festival 
will he held that promises lo outrival any ever before given in 
San Francisco, and one that will he lone remembered. The par- 
ade ef the Native Sons ami Daughters of the Golden West on 

Friday, September 9th, will contain several miles of extraordi- 
nary features, and in which all of the prominent organizations 
will participate. On the three nights of the festival the city 
will he illuminated in splendid style, entertainments will he 
offered without number, and fireworks of every style and device 
will be discharged. There will be on various days, a big open 
air concert by the school children, athletic games al the Park 
Stadium, evolutions by the troops stationed at the Presidio, drifts 
by the Government life saving crews, exhibitions on the bay and 
on land by the fire department, and everything else that can be 
imagined in the way of entertainment. 



Big Panoche 

Oil Stock now selling 
at 

15c. Per Share 



Now is the time to buy before 
the next raise. Big Panoche 
Oil Company, 410 Mills Bldg., 
San Francisco. Phone Kearny 
4585 Home C 1695 



BISHOP & ELY 

630 Security Building Los Angeles, Cal 



SCIENTIFIC TREE 
SURGERY 



Expert Tree Work by Trained Men 
CALIFORNIA OAKS A SPECIALTY 



Branch Office 



San Mateo, Cal 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



The Overland Monthly 



FOR AUGUST WILL CONTAIN 



TO MT. RAINIER'S LOFTY SUMMIT . . . WM. THORNTON PROSSER 143 

Illustrated with Photographs. 

EVENSONG. Verse AGNES LOCKHART HUGHES 149 

THE RAINIER FOREST RESERVE ... A. WOOPHt'KF McCULLY 150 

II. — Indian Henry's Hunting Ground. 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
MADAM PELE— AT HOME' ELIOT KAYS STONE 166 

Illustiated with Photographs. 
THE MISSION BELL AT SANTA BARBARA. Verse V. L. HARDING 1C7 

A DAY IN GUANAJUATO ELLIOTT CRANE 168 

"The Hill of the Singing Frog." 

Illustrated with Photographs. 

NEVADA MOON. Verse LESLIE CURTIS 172 

A BAD MAN'S BLESSING. Story .... ISABEL ROBINSON and 

L. H. S. BAILEY 173 

BIG JACK SMALL J. W. GALLY 179 

Story of Early Days In Nevada. 
THE MEN WHO MAKE SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE. .ARTHUR H. DUTTON 191 

THE DESPAIR OF SCIENCE. Verse . . HARRY COWELL 19G 

"TO BE BURNED, UNOPENED." Story . . HELEN FRANCES HUNTINGTON 196 
TWO SCHOOL-MARMS IN CALIFORNIA'S 

SWITZERLAND .... KATHERIKE M. DOUGLAS 201 

Illustrated with Photographs. 

A SILENT PSALM. Verse JESSIE PORTER WHITAKER 209 

A TRIP TO BEHRING SEA AFTER CODFISH . GEORGE W. EDWARDS 210 

Illustrated with line drawings. 
AMERICA'S OBERAMMERGAU .... GUSTAVE FROHMAN 216 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
THE END OF THE WAY. Verse . . . . W. C. POOLE 221 

THE BIGGEST FACTOR IN DEVELOPING MEXICO'S 

INDUSTRIAL POSSIBILITIES . . . C. E. FERGUSON 822 

Illustrated with Photographs. 

MOONLIGHT. Verse C. ASHTON SMITH 229 

OEDIPUS TYRANNUS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 

CALIFORNIA .... ARTHUR 1NKERSLEY J.l" 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
GOD'S CHOSEN PEOPLE C. T. RUSSELL 288 

VII. — The Passover of the First Born. 



$1.50 Per Year 



15 Cents Per Copy 



July 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



85 




mowmi 



By Li. J. Pinkson. 

\iir wuiomobile owners of s '><» Francisco and vicinity from 
■liihi I ilh In Kith inclusive - 

July 11th— 

JONES, G. "A., 13th and Broadway, Oakland ..Interstate 

ENTERPRISE BREWING CO.. Enterprise St., S. F Grama, 

PHNLAND, H. E., 606 Berkeley Nat. Bank Bldg., Berkeley Ford 

CULLEN, MRS. T. A.. 1320 Filbert St., San Francisco Oakland 

July 12th— 

MAHY. EUGENE. 11131 Sutter St.. San Francisco Reo 

GAGE, MILLS & CO.. 2005 Market street, San Francisco Haynes 

MOORE, MRS. G. BEDELL, 1122 Broadway, Oakland. .Stoddard-Dayton 

WINSON, J., San Mateo Reo 

GOODALL, DR. G. W., 1708 Hyde St.. San Francisco Haynes 

WOOD. J. B.. 6002 San Pablo Avenue, Oakland Mitchell 

S. F. GAS & ELECTRIC CO.. 445 Sutter St.. San Francisco Hudson 

July 13th— 

KING. W. A.. 1257 Market St.. San Francisco Aerocar 

KNOX, H. G., 1456 Harrison St., San Francisco Cartel-car 

HUNTER. J. H., 1351 IS. 23d St., Oakland Regal 

DANIELS, MARK R„ 418 Blair Ave., Piedmont Hupmobile 

July 14 — 

NEWMAN, G. H., 868 Fell St., San Francisco White 

BAER, J., 177 Post St., San Francisco Chalmers 

BROWN, C. A., 322 Twenty-second St., Oakland Detroit 

OAKLAND LIGHT AND HEAT CO., 13th and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Steveng-Duryea 

PAC. BONE, COAL & FBRT. CO., 617 Seventh St., S. F Flanders 

BARNESON. HIBBARD CO., 149 California St., S. F Hudson 

MORSE, M. H., 4498 Piedmont Ave., Oakland Pullman 

NEW METHOD LAUNDRY CO., 425 Sanchez St., S. F Hart Karft 

July 15th— 

CROCKER, E. M., Burlingame Hupmobile 

PETERSON, R„ 1747 Laguna St., San Francisco Winton 

SIMPSON, S. J., 1509 Broadway, Oakland Ford 

WOOD, C. J., Union League Club, San Francisco Apperson 

July 16th— 

BATES, H. S.. 4ls Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco Hudson 

JOHNSON, B. O., 1741 Myrtle St., Oakland Rambler 

McKAY r , W. A., i!97 Broadway, Oakland Fotd 

PORTER, II. D. & A. D„ 37ii Golden Gate Vve., s l<- Rapid 

* * * 

Unjust criticism of the rules governing stools car and stocl 
chassis competition in this count r\ often comes before the public 
through the ignorance of the writer as to the actua] fundamental 
conditions of rule making at the present time. To slate the Eacts 
fairly and squarely as they are is the aim of Edward B. Coffin, 
Chairman of the Rules Committee of the Manufacturers' Con- 
test Association in the following article: 

"The rules and classifications governing Stock Car' and 'Stoi 
Chassis' events were formulated bj the Active Hides Committee 
of the Manufacturers' Contesl \ ation, made up of the rep- 
resentatives of five of the le itor car manufacturers and 
importers of the country, and were afterward criticized, amended 
and finally accepted by the General Rules Committee of h 
five of the representative manufacturers and importers, before 
being passed on to the Con rd of the American Automo- 
bile Association for incorporation in the 1910 rules. Ii 
error to place upon the American Automobile Association the re- 
sponsibility for this portion of the rules. 

"There are no options whatever permitted in a stock ear com- 
petition other than the removal of tops, wind-shields and extra 
tires, even where furnished as regular equipment. It is 
nized of course that these parts might lend a very considerable 
element of danger, particularly in speed eon:, 

» « * 

The last Glidden tour which ended at Chicago a couple of 
after two weeks of tough driving through the Centra' 
and Southern States, has gone on record as the hardest test of 
endurance on both the part of the drivers and the machines that 
has ever been attempted. The remarkable showing made ha* 
stimulated the members of the contest board of the Manufac- 
turers' Association to look for a longer route for next year's 
and the one now most favored is a run from Xew York 
Francisco. The route, judging from reports of enthusiasts who 



i at various timet any mow 

or difficult than the course covered in the last con 

San Francisco dealers and tnotori ts should im | start 

in and campaign to have the coast to coast route selected for the 
next national tour, it is hound to mean much in an automobile 
way to the city, and is sure to bring out a large number of East- 
ern enthusiasts and factory representatives to greet the contest- 
ants as they bowl into the city after their 3,500 mile or so trip 
across the continent. San Francisco would attract the attention 
of the entire motor car world, and the showing made by the com- 
peting cars would be a splendid advertisement for their durabil- 
ity and reliability. Now is the time to get together and work to 
secure the contest. Don't wait. 

Perhaps no more interesting account of the last Glidden tour 
has reached the coast than that of Mortimer C. Reeves, contest, 
manager of the United States Motor Company, who participated 
in the 2850-mile contest through the thirteen Central and 
Southern States. He sums the trip up as a "torture of drivers 
and a punishment of automobiles." 

Iu comparing the 1910 Glidden with the numerous contests 
in which he had previously engaged, Reeves tells a remarkable 
story of the ordeal through which the tourists passed, with par- 
ticular reference to the severity upon himself and his crews. 

In addition to the various bad road hardships encountered. 
Reeves was the only tourist fortunate enough to have to cross 
the Tennessee Mountains at night, having been delayed by exces- 
sive tire trouble. But even the terror of this experience was be- 
yond all comparison with the heroic, measures adopted by many 
of the drivers to keep awake after driving from early morn until 
late at night for more than two weeks. With frequent handicaps 
from the miserable trail they had to follow, their difficulties were 
increased by the hot sun, which first seared arms and faces, and 
with hotter winds, which then inflicted real torture when the 
sun left off. 

Reeves says : "It was truly a test of man as well as car. Many 
of the drivers would reach night controls too late for dinner and 
too much exhausted from a bounding, jolting day's ride to give 
any thought of eating. Our reception was very hospitable in 
various towns. In Kentucky the mountaineers picketed their 
horses to hitching posts and sat on their piazzas awaiting the ar- 
rival of the tourists. 

"For fifty miles from Bowling Green, Ivy., to Nashville, Tenn., 
we traveled over an old stage road which was built before (he 
war. and before the Louisville and Nashville Railroad was com- 
pleted. Originally built of macadam, the surface was washed and 
worn off, revealing a cradle of round boulders on which it was 
built. This, I believe, was the worst one hundred and ninety- 
three mile run ever made by an automobile, for the drivers sim- 
ply had to keep tearing over the boulders and the stumps, a! 
times following creek beds and occasionally driving up streams 
not knowing what was before them. 

"At Nashville we found a Democratic State Convention in 
progress at the Maxwell Hotel. This hostelry was unique among 
those we visited. In the rear part of the first floor just back of 
the lobby the spare was partitioned off into stalls thai were relics 
of pool-selling and other forms of gambling indulged in before 
and after the war. Swinging south into Llabama, one of the 
memorable incidents of the trip OO 01 own of Flor- 

ence. Just as we were entering civilization after a tie 
weary ride, a number of girls rushed into the road with ice 
cream cones and other con opping off their treat with 

some really After a hard day's ride, ice ere cones 

never tasted better. 

"Returning through the Mississippi bottom lands to Memphis, 
Term., and from there to Helena, Ark., the roads were nothing 
more or less than trails through swamps filled with stumps, and 
I am free to sav it was the jarring which we received that kept 
us awake. From Helena our route led fifteen miles along the 
-ippi river levee, a stone abuttment of 15 to 25 feet, 



GOLDEN GATE RADIATOR AND LAMP CO. 

MAKE ASP REPAIR 

Auto Radiators, Electric Lamps and Reflectors, Fenders, Hoods, Gasoline 

Tanks, Mud Pans, Tool Boxes, Etc . 

ESTIMATES GIVEN ON ALL KINDS OF SHEET METAL WORK 

632 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE San Francisco. Cal 

Phone Franklin 5565 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



which keeps the river from overflowing into the bottom lands. 

"At Texarcana we were amused by the geography of the town, 
having parked our cars in two States at the same time, with our 
front wheels in Texas and our rear wheels in Arkansas. The 
border line of the two States makes it necessary for Texarkaua 
to maintain two police departments. Furthermore in getting 
their mail, the residents receive letters in one State and post 
them in another, the building being on the State line. 

"Id getting further south into Lexington, we were favorably 
impressed by the reception accorded us in some of the larger 
cities. There was a great deal of enthusiasm over the entire 
route, and the only real excitement occurred when a fractious 
horse was encountered on a narrow road, which invariably re- 
sulted in a leap by the driver into the woods, leaving the Eright- 
ened animal to fare as best he could. 

"In leaving Dallas, prairie roads were followed ;ill the way to 
Chicago. In Liawton, Oklahoma, we inspected the Fort Sills 

i. rumen! reservation, passing a number of Indians who were 

camped on the reservation. Lawton is a prairie city less than 
eight years (ill, yet it lias asphalt streets from 60 1" 100 feet 
wide, with concrete sidewalks to its Eurthermosl points. This 
development is practically due l" the fad Unit there arc a num- 
ber of asphalt beds in the vicinity. The town has a most strik- 
ing appearance because of its absence of trees. 

■■In passing through Oklahoma City and entering Kansas, 
the Inn prairie winds caused much suffering, although the natives 
said it was •nut very warm.' These winds were encountered all 
the wa\ to Kansas City, and there were practically no trees or 
bills where protection could be sought. In some places we found 
that the fanners had grown trees around the houses as shelter 

from cyclones, and these tree- were the only (Hies we saw for 
many hundred miles. From the prairie road- we bit the Kansas 
gumbo ones. Hard rain the night before bad softened up the 
surface oi this sticky stuff, and we found il difficult Id keep the 
cars en the road at all. yet despite this severe running, practi- 
cally no misfortune was met. The three days' run from Omaha 
i.i Chicago was uneventful, except for the j<>\ expressed by 

Acn one over the conclusii E the hardest ant bile contesi 

that has ever been conducted in this or any other country. It 

was an abnormal test in every way." 

It is doubtful if the trip from New York to San Francisco 

can be any more strenuous than the foregoing, BO let's boost and 
see if we cannot get the next tour headed to tlii- city. 

* * * 

S. <:. Chapman experienced an unusually good demand for bis 
cars (Inline the week just past. On Thursday alone he sold an 
Oakland "Hi" touring car to ('. F. Suinmy. of Sutter City, and 

llupmobiles to Win. II. Crocker of Burlingame; C. E. Whitney 

of San Mateo, and Wallace of Stockton. 

* * * 

George IT. Newman, the prominent local business man. has 
just taken delivery oi a Model M-.M White steamer. The car is 
beautifully equipped, and is attracting wide attention because 

of its line appearance. 

* * * 

('. s, Howard, president of the Howard Automobile Company, 
recently look delivery of ;i Buick car for bis own private use. 



BELKNAP 

Addressing Machine 

TOR SALE CHEAP 

One power drive Belknap Addressing Machine 
complete with typewriter to stencil names. Will 
address and cut 6000 wrappers per hour. 

Room 16, 773 Market Street 



STRENGTH R^RHeNDURANCE 




■ 



THE strength and endurance of AJAX TIRES 
res! upon the solid and substantial character 
of their construction. 

Every ounce of rubber, every inch of fabric, every 
ingredient that enters into their manufacture is 
scrupulously scrutinized. The finished tire is sub- 
jected to expert examination before it is allowed to 
leave the factory. AJAX workmen are among the 
mosT skillful and highest paid in the tire industry 

Severest tesTs for years on racing tracks, country 
roads, and city streets have demonstrated the unfailing 
superiority of AJAX TIRES. 

The Only Tires in the World Guaranteed 
for 5,000 Miles or 200 Days' Service 

AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER CO. 

544 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Factories: Trenton, N. J. 

BRANCHES: 

New York City. Philadelphia. Boston. Porllaod (Ore). San Francisco. 

Los Angeles. Seattle. Minneapolis, Kansas City. Milwaukee. 

St. Louis. Chicago. Atlanta. Detroit. Denver 



FREE UNTIL AUG 1 

New Automobile Road Map 3x4j ft. 

100 Miles Around San Francisco 

SCALE: 4 miles to 1 inch 



Just published. Shows the following features: 

1. All main roads in heavy black lines easily found. 

2. Secondary roads in lighter lines. 

3. Township and section lines. 

4. Early Mexican Grants or Banchos. 

5. All Railroads, including Electric Roads. 

6. Area flooded by Sacramento River in January, 1909. 

7. TJ. S. Forest Reserves. 

8. Rivers, Lakes, Towns, etc. 

9. Guide Arrows at margin indicating where all roads lead, 

with adjacent largest town, indicating distance and 
direction. 
Pocket Form, on Parchment .... $8.50 

Send $4 for One Year's Subscription to the San Francisco 

News Letter and get this Auto Map in Pocket Form 

FREE 

Fill in this form and send to office 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



773 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Please send San Francisco News Letter to the following 
address for One Year for which I agree to pay Four 
Dollars on delivery of New Auto Map as described above 



NAME- 



ADDRESS- 



July 23, 1910. 



and California .Advertiser 



37 



Among the first automobile maki i announce their 1911 
models is the Chalmers Motor Co., of Detroit. The wide repu- 
tation that (he Chalmers has gained in the pastj and the fad 
that it is one of the best and most generally known ears of 

American construction, always gives interest to the anno 

ment of their season's models. This year the Chalmers has made 
no essential changes in mechanical necessities, but oilers much 
to show that the progressive spirit that has in the past vitalized 
the Chalmers plant is still there. 

A telegram sent to J. W. Leavitt Company, Monday evening, 
by .Miss Scott, the famous woman motorist who is driving the 
Lady Overland across the continent, states that she had arrived 
in Salt Lake City after a most interesting day's trip through 
Hocky Mountain grandeur, including a seven-mile elimb over 
Medicine Kow. The mileage already traveled totals 4321, and 
this entire distance has been made without any car trouble. Miss 
Scott has decided to come straight to San Francisco instead of 

going first to Los Angeles as originally intended. 

* * * 

A Hupmobile that is demonstrating the efficiency of this type 
of machine as a general utility car, is that owned by Miss C. M. 
Easterday. Miss Easterday is a manufacturer's agent, and han- 
dles an enormous business that requires daily rounds to every 
corner of the city. Finding other transfer methods inadequate, 
Miss Easterday recently took delivery of a Hupmobile from S. 
G. Chapman, and the little car successfully solved the problem. 
The machine is proving both adequate and economical. 

* * * 

According to advices received by Calvin C. Eib from J. L. 
Meredith of Mason City, Iowa, Mr. Meredith has just succeeded 
in driving his Hudson roadster up a 45 per cent grade that has 
long baffled ambitious autoists in his section of the country. In 
the letter, he said that the aciiievoment of the car, which was ac- 
complished splendidly without mishap of any kind, had attracted 
attention for miles around, this Hudson being the first and only 
car to make the climb. 

* * * 

Phil Lyon, of the Chanslor & Lyon Company, has returned to 
Los Angeles from a combined business and pleasure trip up the 
coast to Seattle and into the Sacramento Valley, California. 
Business at all his company "s branch stores is exceptionally good, 
for the demand for auto supplies keeps pace with the thousands 
of new cars marketed on this coast each season. 

* * * 

Gage, Mills & Co., the well-known local wholesale lumber 
dealers have just taken delivery of a llaynes car. The machine, 
which is to be used for business purposes, is specially painted 
in an attractive green. The Gage-Mill's business covers a wide 
territory, and the Haynes will be called upon for some particu- 
larly hard service. 

* * * 

On his record-breaking run lo Del Monte and return in a 
Buick "White Streak," Al. Leonard used Monogram Oil. He 
states that the lubrication throughout the nip was perfect in 
every respect, and that Monogram responded heroically to the 
demand made upon it by the constant rapidity with which the 
motor was working. 

* * * 

Dr. A. P. Mulligan, for a long time I prominent 

of local physicians and now associated with the Southern Pacific 
Company as surgeon, has jusi taken delivery of a close-coupled 
Olds Special with complete am! equipment. The 

purchase wa through the local branch of the Howard 

Automobile Company. 

* * » 

J. H. Shie of the 11. E. Wilcox Motor Car 

Company of Minneapolis, manufacturers of the Wilcox truck. 

lias just Id! for Portland, Oregon, after having paid a three 
weeks 1 visil to the Pioneer Automobile Company, local Wilcox 
distributors. 



Vulcanizing 



When the best argument our contempo- 
raries can make for their oil, is that 

"It is the same as MONOGRAM." 
"Looks just like MONOGRAM." 

Why not use that standard of excellence? 

MONOGRAM OILS 

Ask for it. See that you get it. 

NEW YORK LUBRICATING OIL CO. 

GEORGE P. MOORE, Pacific Coail Manager 
586 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 



Have your automobile work done by a Reliable Firm. Cars 
wired for electric lights. All work guaranteed. No "overchirge" in 
this establishment. 

INDEPENDENT GARAGE 

BRANCH OF 

INDEPENDENT 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

Directors — S.H.Horne, President; F.W.Dohrmann,Jr.,Vice-Pres.; 

J. M. Carlson, Sec'y andTreas.; C. M. Fickert, Dr. Kaspar Pischel. 

381 FULTON ST., San Francisco, Cal. S. H. HORNE, Manaeer 

Phone Market 2196 



FOR SALE 

Autocar Runabout 

"With top, lamps and generator 
in good condition $200. The 
most reliable of them all. 

453 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



A Perfect Score 

FOR THE 

SPLITDORF equipped Reo and Mitchell Cars 

IN THE 

New York- Atlanta Reliability Tour 

Only the Be£t and Most Dependable Ignition 

enabled these cars to achieve this splendid 

result. 

G. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch 
520 VAN NESS AVENUE San Francisco 



"SxtiV Sparking* Batteries 

BATTERIES CHARGED AND OVERHAULED 

ELECTRICAL VEHICLE CHARGING AND REPAIRING 

AUTOMOBILE WIRING FOR ELECTRIC LIGHTS 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 630 Van Ness Avenue 

Phone Franklin 2772 



PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone M.rk.t 6370. 




•an Frandaeo, Cal. Thomas B. Jeffery Jc Company, 117-125 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



Tips to Automobilists 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 
14-MILE HOUSE — "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Automobile Supplies and Re- 
pair shop. First class accommodations. Cuisine unsurpassed on the 
Coast. "Andy," formerly of the "Cliff House." 

SAN MATEO.— Brown's Garage, SaO B street. Phone Mateo 57. 

C. J. Brown, Prop. Open day and night. Expert automobile re- 
pairing, supplies, battery charging, high-grade gasoline and oils. 

NORTH OF BELMONT. — Cypress .Lodge. First-class mixed drinks. 
Bring your lunch baskets and enjoy our little forest. Special attention to 
motor parties. CHAS". P. HOWKE, Prop. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
PALO ALTO. — Palo Alto Garage, the only first-class Are-proof garage 
in Palo Alto. 443 Emmerson street (.one and a half blocks from depot.) 
Expert automobile mechanics. High-grade oils, gasoline and sundries. 
Carah & Schenck, prop. Phone P. A. 333. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. UO.uOO square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler, Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. cSee under Stockton.) 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill. 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular atiention. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

GILROY HOT SPRINGS. — Twelve miles of fine, good road from Gllrov. 
Just the place to sta> over Saturday and Sunday. Hot plunge. Good 
fishing and hunting; gasoline and automobile oils. 

GILROY. — Central Hotel, A. C. Richardson, Prop. Headquarters for au- 
tomobilists. Bar in connection. Newly furnished throughout. Telephone 
Main 861. 

MADRON E. — Madrone Exchange. A. Boecker, Prop. Gasoline. Meals 
at ail hours. Phone Farmers 93 for special chicken dinner. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 
UKIAH, CAL. — Ukiah Garage. John Snow, proprietor. Expert auto- 
mobile repairing, Sundries, Oils, Gasoline. Best equipped garage in 
Mendocino County. Open day and night. Telephone 1263. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 
CLOVERDALE. — Warren's Garage. Fully equipped blacksmith and 
machine shop. Expert Auto Repairing, Gasoline and Supplies. Open day 
and night. Phone Main 221. Geo. F. Warren, Proprietor. 

CLOVERDALE.— United States Hotel. M. Menlhan, Proprietor. Only 
first class hotel in town. Electric lighted. Hot and cold water In every 
loom. Detached baths, special attention to touring parties. Phone Main 
233. 

SANTA ROSA.— Houts Auto Co., Mendocino avenue, one-half block 
north of Court House. Expert automobile repairing, supplies, tires, oIIb 
and gasoline. Open day and night. Tel. 527. 

BOYES HOT SPRINGS.— Steve's Grill. The automobllist's paradise— 
where you can obtain the finest and most appetizing breakfast, lunch 
or dfhner In the State of California. Special attention given to auto- 
mobilists. Wines and liquors of all kinds. Tel. Sub 64. 

LAKE COUNTY. 
LAKEPORT, CAL.— Enterprise Machine Works. H. Slotter and J. A. 
Schneider, Props. Forbes street, between 9th and 10th. Phone 66. Ex- 
pert auto repairing, electrical work. Agents for Panhard Oils and Greases, 
Gasoline, Batteries and Auto Supplies. 

NAPA COUNTY. 
NAPA. — Elegant ioads from Vallejo, through Napa County. The GEO. 

D. REYNOLDS GARAGE, 208 N. Main street. Automobile repairing and 
sundries. Panhard Oil a specialty. 

PETRIFIED FOREST.— Five miles from Callstoga, on the Santa Rosa 
road. One of the world's wonders. Here the eye is attracted and the 
mind is overwhelmed in a bewildering mass of giant trees trampled to 
earth by the forces of early volcanic action and long since turned to stone 
Good automobile road. J. I. NELSON, Santa Rosa, R. F. D. No. 6. 



ST. HELENA.— Phllo S. Grant Garage. 
Machinists. Expert automobile repairing. 
Service at all hours. 



Phone Main 771. General 
Oils, sundries and gasoline. 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 
STOCKTON— WALLACE BROS." GARAGE. 30 S. 
convenient location. Best of service. Large stock 
Oakland and Hupmobile agencies. Phone Main 287. 



Sutter Street. Most 
sundries. Rambler, 
(See San Jose.) 



AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

444 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Everything for the Auto at Prices which are Right 

Open Evenings Until 9 P. M. Open Sundays Until 3 P. M. 



E. 1'. Brinegar, president of the Pioneer Automobile Com- 
pany, is just in receipt of Borne interesting information con- 
cerning the new Hudson factory.. Speaking of it, lie says: "With 
two hundred men at work,' forms arising, a mile of sewers laid. 
gigantic quantities of material piling up daily, and the railroa I 
laying its five sidings, the Hudson's new $500,001) Factorj in 
Detroit, Michigan, begins to assume reality. 

"As an indication of the size of the new factory, the contrac- 
tors have estimated that the following amounts of materia] will 
be needed: 1,000,000 bricks, 500,000 feel of lumber, W0 tons - 
re-inforced steel; 5,000 square feet of glass, and 100.000 Backs 
of cement. 

■'If placed end to end, the bricks would more than stretch 
across the State of Michigan at its widest point; the lumber 

would reach over ninety-four miles, and Ihe sacks of ce ill 

would extend nine miles." 

* * * 

The wonderful performances recorded this season for the Hup- 
mobile in various economy and endurance tests have completely 
proven the possibilities of a small two-passenger machine, anil 
have Bhown the Hupp to be an innovation of greatest importance 
in the automobile Held. Two remarkable rictoriee have just 
been recorded for this small type car. One was in the Denver 

Post's reliability run of IS niles, in which Ihe Hupmobile Won 

the award for its class. The other achii remenl was in Hie De- 
troit to Cleveland run, a distance of 18. r > miles in ten hours 
elapsed time. The Hupmobile made the remarkable record of 
33:6 miles to each gallon of gasoline, using Imt five and one- 
half gallons for the entire distance. 

* * * 

Second among nine cars to start a Hudson, driven by James 
Levy, in ide an important showing in the Fuel Economy Tesi 
of the Chicago Motor Club, May 19th. Only six ears finished 
up the run, which was a 190 mile course from Chicago to Dake 
Geneva and return. 2:\'>. was the percentage awarded the Hud- 
son by the judges. This was figured oul by the formula employed 
by the Chicago Motor Club — dividing the weight of the ear bj 
thi gasoline consumed in ounces. The Hudson, with four per- 
sons > I. weighed 2,780 pounds. It consumed l.i 16 ounces of 

gasoline — an average of '.'I :34 miles pei gallon. 

* * * 

Tony Nichols, presidenl of the Weinstock-Nichols Cora 
and one of the most popular figures in the local automobile busi- 
ness, is touring the EbbI in company with A. I. Philp, vice- 
president of the Morgan & Wright Rubber Company. All the 
large cities of importance are to be visited, and automobile and 
automobile tire situation studied extensively. Nichols, who has 
been gone about a month now, is not expected to return for at 
least another thirty d;i . 

* * * 

Manager Colin, of the Bouquet-Cohn Cigar Company, was 
among those who autoed to Reno to witness the tussle bi 
the respective topes of 'lie blacl and white races on the Fourth. 
Cohn drove his White gasoline ear. and had a trip replete with 
unusually interesting experiences. 

* * * 

A. F. and I.'. \. Castle, of San Jose, have just passed through 
town in an Oakland "30" roadster, en route for Humboldt 

Count), where they are to enjoy a hunting and fishing ea sion 

The machine was Well loaded down with camping equipment. 

* * * 

Mr. C. L. Simmons has associated himself with the Lozier 
.Motor Company, and has started on an extended trip Ihroughoiil 
the South and West, visiting old agencies and extending 

Lozier field of operation into new territory. 

* * * 

Glenn M. Nelson, who owns a Rambler, is a constanl user of 
Hartford tires. Mr. Nelson has got Bome extremely lend Ber- 
viee from his ear. and reports that the Hartfords used have al- 
ways given the best kind of satisfaction. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTOMOBILE 

NOTHING BUT THE BEST 

CO. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



CHANSLOR 
Polk and Golden Gate 



& LYON MOTOR SUPPLY 



July 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



39 



Below is given a partial list, of the California motorists who 

registered at Del Monte last week, and the 

driven by each : B. Stimson, Cadillac; L A. Mitchell, Locomo 
bile; W. Mills, Stearns; P. E. Drescher, Locomobile; \\ . S. 
Thompson, Pierce-Arrow; L. T. Sates, Peerless; John Reding- 
ton, Chalmers-Detroii ; T. L. Milton, Ford: S. M. Griffith, Win- 
ton Big Six; P. Feme, Packard; Mrs. Main-, Peerless; C. E. 
Green, Locomobile; W. W. Tillman, Pierce-Arro^i : M. 0. Mack, 
Buick; Mr, L. Gerstle, Pierce- Arrow ; ('. IT. Wilhelm, Packard 
N. Williams, Cadillac; U. Wright, Locomobile; ('. E. Anthony, 
Packard; G. H. Ennis, Locomobile; Goo. Burton, Stoddard- 
Dayton; J. V. Laveage, Packard; P. B. Booth, Lozier. 

* * * 

The Premier No. 1, which won this year's Glidden tour 
through one of the most remarkable runs ever recorded in this 
country, used Stromberg carburetors. A telegram from the Pre- 
mier Motor Manufacturing Company has just been forwarded 
to H. D. McCoy, Manager of the local branch of the Chanslor 
& Lyon Motor Supply Co. It reads : "We congratulate you upon 
the excellent showing made by Stromberg Carburetors on Pre- 
mier No. 1, winner of 1910 Glidden tour. No attention or ad- 
justment required during the long and trying contest." 

THE CASE OF THE SYMPATHETIC STRIKE IN NEW 
YORK. 

This is a case where a firm of East Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
woodworkers had a contract for the interior finishing of the 
I lathedral of St. John the Divine. Morningside Heights. A pre- 
liminary injunction was obtained restraining the joint district 
council of New York of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and other affiliated 
labor trusts from interfering on the plaintiff's work on the 
cathedral. The temporary injunction has been made permanent 
by Judge Ward, of the United Stales District Court. 

In his decision, the judge said that there is an undoubted 
right in workingmen uniting for their own protection and that 
they have a further right to strike peaceably because of griev- 
ances. It is interesting to note the judge's words in rendering 
his decision. It may lie that the cumulative force of such de- 
cisions, as published in the weeklj press of the city of San Fran- 
cisco, may eventually culminate in giving employers, who arc 
ridden to death by the labor trust, the courage to turn and the 
courts the backbone to render decisions that savor of American- 
ism and of justice, to the end that the flagging and ncar-unto- 
de.ith industries of San Francisco may be revived. 

Says the court: 

"This right to call out the workmen of other employees, who 
have no grievance, or to threaten owners, builders and an biti 
is quite .mother affair. 

"To take the converse of the proposition, will the defendants 
admit that employers maj combine to prevent any employer from 
using union labor? May the employers agree noi to sell, or 
contract with any one who deals with an employer who uses 
union labor? 

"Either of these propositions is destructive a ght of 

free men to labor for, or to employ the labor of any one the lab- 
orer or the employer wishes. 

"If the struggle is persisted in between capital and lab 
establish a contrary view, ultimately either the wo the 

employers will be reduced to a condition of involontan 
ritude." 

li ia noteworthy that while the gist of the above was tele- 
graphed to evi taper in San Francisco, not one of the 
proprietors now enjoying involuntary - to the uni 
n'cd publish it. 

I OB \ngeles an I 5 - had the : oath 

of news, on the 13th of duly. The Sacramento Bee gave it a 
head. 



IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR VALUE 
Examine the KLINE-KAR Before you bu> 




6 Cylinder, 45 h.p. $2500. 4 Cylinder, 30 h p. $1575, f. o. b 

FRANK 0. RENSTROM CO. 

424-446 STANYAN STREET Opposite Golden Gate Park 

BRANCH S. W. CORNER GOLDEN GATE and VAN NESS AVENUE 
REPAIRING IN ALL BRANCHES AND SUPPLIES 



Splitdorf Magneto 

VICTORIOUS 

in the Glidden Tour 



The Chicago Trophy in the Glidden Tour 
won by the SPLITDORF equipped Moline. 

Out of twelve contestants for this Trophy 
only five finished, and of these five four 
were equipped with the SPLITDORF MaKneto, namely 
three Molines and the Maxwell car, all of 
which had Absolutely Perfedt Ignition 
throughout the entire contest. 

For the Glidden Trophy the Maxwell 
made a magnificent showing and finished 
a close third. 



C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coasl Branch 
520 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 




Expert Work on Auto 
Tires and Tubes. 

Compressed Air on 
Tap at the Curbing 



PHONE 

FRANKLIN 3727 



616-618 
VAN NESS AVENUE 



hermoi 



"Tires 

TRY ONE 



I For Those Seeking 
QUALITY 
NOT PRICE 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 



Philip Morris 

ORIGINAL ■*■ LONDON 

Cigarettes 



They're the true 
definition of 
"quality." 





CAMBRIDGE 1C„ 
in bo»« o( ten £■•-"" 



the after-dinner tize 

In Cork and Plain Tips 

'The Little Brown Box' 



•■!.:■ ■■ 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone Douglas 2608 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 



Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M. 
and by appointment 



Phone Douglas 4188 



Galen Bide.. 391 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 



Union Lumber Company- 
Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles. Shingles. Split Shakes. Etc. 
Main Office — Crocker Bide., San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills — Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 
Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Succeeding A. ZeDerbich & Sou 
Zellerbach Building', S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Street* 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately. 
107 Montgomery BtreeL near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 

Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTI8TS. 

W. A Bryant, M. D., D. D. 8., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a- m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. ro. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 403 
Weatbank Building, corner Ellis and Market 

ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. 8hortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 

clsco. Tel. Douglas 2173. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
206-206 Westbank Building, 830 Market street. San Francisco. 




Foi: a Union 
hi Latin States. 



The report comea from the Pan- 
American i longress thai there is a 
confidential movement being engi- 
neered by some of the more conser- 
valive and capable thinkers of Centra] Ami rica for the purpose 
of uniting- the five republics in a federation, and thus establish 
vhat will he called the United States of Central America under 
cne general Government and one Constitution. The organizers 
of the movement believe there is no other rational or substantial 
solution of the political problems that not only confront the 
States, but which keep them in a state of internal agitation, 
which seriously retards their commercial and industrial develop- 
ment. The parties who have the project in hand say that the 
lositive step to the final consummation of the federation 
will have to be the elimination of the professional revolutionists 
.-in an participation in either the initial or subsequent work 
of adjusting the relation that States shall bear to one another 
in the Federation, and also how far State lights shall obtain 
independent of the general Government, but the opinion seems 
to prevail that past experience, together with the element that 
is ever ready to rush to arms to secure control of State Govern- 
ments, makes it verv clear that the new nation will have to have 
a centralized Government with practically no such thing as State 
sovereignty, but with the ordinary though greatly restricted 
machinery of State Government, the right, however, of the 
national Congress and courts to review Stat'- legislation for ap- 
proval or rejection must obtain, somi fell J8 i - hold, to 
insure the peace of the States. The idea is to settle the question 
of State rights at the outset ing their independence as a 
separate law-making power. Even the police power of a State is 
to be extremely limited where the off mi-political. 
All such authority, the scheme is, to lodge in the general Govern- 
ment. To prevent ambition- Generals and others from inaugu- 
rating revolutions, the crime of treason «ill be made, it is pro- 
posed, to include disloyal utterances and conferences that might 
be calculated to create unrest in the mind- of tin- people or 
otherwise disturb the peace and good order of the country. The 
self-appointed committee that is doing all 

bankers, merchani - and professional men of the several 

States, and some of them are delegates to the Pan-American 
conference. It is not expected thai tangible results will follow 
right away, but it is hoped the better class of citizen? will agi- 
tate the subject and get public sentiment to make the federation 
a popular issue. 



MOKOCCAN SOItCKItY 

and France. 



Prance is sending a strong column 
promenade through the interior 

of .\l or prudential reasons 

rather than to wage war against the 
restless tribes, but tin only goes to 

show that the Moroccan problem is still full of uncertainties and 
perplexities. The cause of the present expedition looks so ruueh 
like an absurd joke at this distance that it is hard to understand 
how France can be bo patient with such fanatics and barbarians. 
Tin/ trouble that calls for troops is thai a professional sorcerer is 

so stirring some of the interioi b - bj bis incantations ami 

"inspire, i" utterances thai then i- danger of a wide-spread up- 
rising. And till' fact that he i> moving in the direction of Fez. 
the capital. With a large following of believers in his divine mis- 
sion is making France as well a- the Sultan. Mulai llai'nl. sus- 
picious that the fellow's intentions are in declare himself the 
rightful ruler of , and inaugurate a war to promote his 

cause. That lie lias a large following seems to be assured, and 
i that he is making many of tiie tribes believe that he is 
under divine guidance to purge the country "I heretics ami for- 
eigners gives his presen lead of a mob of blind re] 
ists somewhat of a serious bearing apon the Moroccan situation. 
The General commanding the Preni b column is under instruc- 
tions to pacify the tribes and persuade Ihem i" repudiate the 
sorcerer, lest he lead them into I loubli lit end in French 
occupation and martial law for their country, lint if they p 



Jum 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



in obeying the pretender, Ma] Ainin, and continue to threaten 
an uprising and capture ot Fez, il is believed Prance will adopl 
i , . ■ measures and extend her authority from a protectorate to 
one that will mean territorial ownership and French rule in 
eveything. 



The surprise of the hour is the an- 
Of Generai [nterest. nouncement from Berlin that a Brit- 
ish syndicate has been Formed to 
finance the extension of the German-Bagdad railway enterprise 
: : i i 1 1 that by permission of the Turkish Government the syndicate 
has secured many square miles of territory between the Tigris 
and Euphrates rivers, presumably to colonize British subjects 
from the mother country. The surprise is. that only a week ago 
the German Government semi-orficially announced thai a German 
syndicate representing a capital of $150,000,000 had been or- 
ganized by permission of the Government to do about the same 
thing that the British syndicate is organized to do, except that 
the German syndicate had made no effort to secure titles to the 
Euphrates-Tigris Valley. This would seem to indicate a pur- 
pose on the part of England to make haste to get a strong foot- 
hold in Asia Minor. Berlin financial circles arc quite excited 
over this action of English capitalists in the premises. 

The Spanish ministry has quit trying to disguise that it is to 
be the policy of the Government to follow close in the steps of 
France in dealing with Borne, but there is far more danger of 
a revolution in Spain than there was in France, for the masses in 
Spain are disposed to reject the plan to separate the Church and 
SI ale. while in Prance they were more or less indifferent. 

The Social Democrats of Germany are steadily improving their 
position in national politics. The Kaiser gives it out that he 
will establish and edit a newspaper to show the people the fallacy 
of trying to inject the principles of socialism in the administra- 
tion of the public concerns of the Empire. 

The British ministry has intimated its willingness to co-oper- 
ate with Germany in a plan to put a stop to the rivalry between 
the nations of the world in warship building. 

The Cretan question is now practically a closed incident, which 
removes the darkest of the war clouds from the Near East. 

The English budget provides for expenditures during the 
fiscal year of more than one billion dollars, which is about the 
same as this nation will require to keep the wheels of Government 
well lubricated, except that our current expenditures do not in- 
clude the cost of construction work on the Panama Canal. 

Italy gives notice that she will not tolerate any departure from 
the "most highly favored nation" principle, which may be con- 
strued to mean that some nation is discriminating against Ital- 
ian subjects and Italian commerce. 

The British Government gives il mil cold ami flat that the 
new South African Federation must he officered and governed by 
white men. This cuts out all aspiring Asiatics, including British 
Hindu's subjects. 

The German ministerial crisis is a lame affair. The Kaiser 
docs not give objectionable portfolio holders time to do much 
kicking or to frame exi u 



.Tames .T. Hill, discussing public ownership al s dinner 

in New York, said: "I fear thai with publii lip we would 

he woi i Take the case of Prance. Frame, you know, 

makes her own matches. Lnd such mat les! "\ Frenchman 
was once arrested at his lodgings. \ Lot 
matches— the duty on foreign no the prohibitive 

a cent per match -had been found in his trunk. The judjj 

to the man: Toreign lave been discovered in your pos- 

session. What have von to say for yourself, miscreant?' Tlease, 

your honor, 1 stammered the prisoner, "'it is Irue 1 use 

ies, but only to light o nmeni ones with." — D 

Frcr Press. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also nt Fairmont Hotel 



Now is the time to have your carpets cleaned — while awav 

on your vacation. Telephone to the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning 
-. 989 Golden Gate avenue (telephone Market 643). and 
they will call for them. You may allow them to remain at the 
works until your return, or have them returned at once, as you 
desire. All work guaranteed. 




TAKE OFF THE FAT WHERE IT SHOWS. 

Most women suffer much humiliation because of great quanti- 
ties of fat, so located that, no matter how they dress, everybody 
sees that they are abnormal. This is the day of the slender figure, 
and fat women are simply not tolerated either in business or 
social affairs. Women may not know it, but men when they 
sec a fat woman pass them on the street make all manner of sym- 
pathetic remarks about her. They do not mean to be unkind or 
io seem unmanly, but it is natural for a man to dislike fat on a 
woman. Where fat shows the most there is where it must be 
removed, and as quickly as possible. The hot weather dresses 
seem to be made for the fat woman's misery, and the slender wo- 
man's delight. They expose all the charms of woman and her 
ugliness as well. Exercise and diet will not remove fat. This 
has been proved. The famous Marmola prescription, which has 
met with such phenomenal success and has so many of our soci- 
ety women as its sponsors, is now being sold in tablet form to 
meet the demand of the public for this style of treatment. These 
little tablets go into your system just like food. They stop the 
stomach and digestive apparatus from producing fat and reduce 
the fat upon the body at the rate of from 12 to 15 ounces a day. 
They are harmless, and can be carried in your purse and taken 
even after you have indulged in a hearty meal away from home. 
They are sold at all drug stores at 75 cents a case, or if you pre- 
fer, you may write the Marmola Company 1219 Farmer Bldg., 
Detroit, Mich. 



Yosemite Valley 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

Plan to spend your vacation in 
California's Wonderland 

GOOD HOTELS-BOARDING CAMPS- 
PRIVATE CAMPING- 

Your choice at reasonable rates. 

Conditions are ideal for Rest and Recreation — 

Daily outings to points of interest 
Jolly times around the evening camp-fire. 
The best of society; congenial companions. 
ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER. ANY 
Southern Pacific or Santa Fe ticket agent, or 
O.W. LEHMER. TRAFFIC MANAGER, Y. V. R. R., Merced, Cal. 




Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 

-DIRT IN THE HOUSE BUILDS THE HIGH- 
WAY TO BEGGARY." BE WISE IN TIME AND USE 

SAPOLIO 



32 San Francisco News Letter 

Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 

Capital,- $1,500,000 Assets, $7,000,000 



July 23, 1910. 




INSWAM 




California and Banaom* Street*, 
San Francisco. California. 



Cash Capital, 9400.000. Cash Assets, $970,146 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Accident 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurer; F. P. Dee ring, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L. Brayton. John C. Cole- 
man. W. E. Dean. F. P. Deering. E. F. Green. James K. Moftitt, J. W. Phillips. Henry 
Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son. 

Head Office — Merchants' "Exchange Building, San FranclBco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 416 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Cash Capital Jl.000.000 

Cash Assets 6,966,216 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,790,360 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 11,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., Agenta. 
160 California Street Ban Francisco 

The We& Coaft Life Insurance Co. 



SAN FRANCI8CO, CAL. 



A strong;, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
law. of California. Its policy forma are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. w. Dean 



Geo. 



Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
Ill California St.. San Francisco. Cal. Phone Douglas llll 



PACIFIC SURETY COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 

Incorporated 1885 
SURETY ON BONDS 

PLATE GLASS INSURANCE 
Head Office— FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
FRED B. LLOYD, President 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 

Organized 186S. . Cash Capital, $J,000.000 

Insurance on peisonal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire. Automobile insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental Income by 
Are. 

H. L. ROFF. General Agent J. J. 8HEARAN, Aaa't General Agent 

324 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



risks in the congested dis- 
with the exception of 29 



1400 to 1460 Fourth St., San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 



lii response to a letter containing statistics concerning Oak- 
land's fixe protection, with a request of a reduction of rates Eor 
the business section, the Pacific Board Mas replied :is follows: 
The fire protection of Oakland, Cal., is having the consideration 
of our committee, From a list of 181 
t riii . \vi- lind a reduction in all eases. 

building3. 

* * * 

As the result of the Portland fire of July 13th, the Losses ap- 
proximately are as follows: Exposition building and its contents, 
100; Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club, $75,000; Angelia 
Hotel, $50, ; Howland Hotel, $30,000; George Maker, theat- 
rical scenery, $15,000; Western Salvage Co., furniture, $15,000; 
George Orton, Florist, $10,000; residences and miscellani - 

property, $40,000; total, $300,000. 

* * * 

The Bohemian Club, of which the late Colonel Laurie Bunteu 

hi- a popular member, has offered a reward of $500 tor the dis- 

covery of the driver of the mysterious automobile which caused 

li- death by running him down while he was crossing Market 

street a few days ago. Colonel Bunteu was an insurance broker 

and a well-known figure about town. Among the Bohemians he 

was a raconteur of some fame, and was known as an entertaining 

cynic, possessed of a certain dry and crisp Scottish wit. lie had 

been a member of the Bohemian Club for a score of years. 

» » * 

i 'ec 'ii minion of Fire Chief Murphy, the Board of 

Fire Commissioners have approved the following purchases Eor 
the use of the San Francisco Fire Department: Two motor- 
driven chemical engines; one motor-driven and operated pump- 
ing engine, with a capacity of less than 700 gallons per min- 
ute; three motor-driven hose wagons, each to carry not less than 
1,500 feet of 3% inch hose, to be used as fire boat tenders and 
high pressure wagons in the wholesale district: one motor bat- 
ion : one an i. en,, Mile lo he used My (he second assistant fire chief, 

and 10,000 Feet of three and one-half inch fire hoBe, 

* * * 

J. H. Richards, recentlj elected secretary and general mana- 
ger of the Los Angeles Fire Insurance Company, resigned last 
week as special agent for Daniel Duncan, and went to Los An- 
geles to assume his Dew duties. As previously announced, the 
Los Angeles Mas been licensed bj the California Insurance De- 
partment, and will begin writing business as soon as thi neces- 
sary policy form and other blanks can be prepared under the 

n ision of Mr. Richards. 

* * * 

There has jusl been put on file in the larger libraries of the 
Bountry a volume containing the addresses and paper- on life in- 
surance and other subjects, by former United -States Senator John 
V. linden, organizer and president of the Prudential Insurance 
Gompany of America. Mr. Dryden's book is one of the rerj 
few books that ha\e lieen writ l on "ii this subject. The volume 
treats of the inception and early problems of the business, as 
well as the social economy and practice of what 1 lit? author 
claims is one of the mo I effective methods of family protection 

devised. 

* * * 

A. M. Shields, manager of the Equitable's Great Western De- 

pan mem. during the past sis ths of this year, paid for a full 

half-million of business written with Mi- own pen. He is off, 

now. on a well-earned vacation, and during'his absence, Agency 

Supervisor Charles A. McLane has inaugurated a campaign for 

business in his honor. 

» * * 

Fire Insurance in Texas is practically at a stand-still. While 
all of the companies have filed amended schedules in conformity 
with the order by the State Board, they have d< so under pro- 
test, and are prepared to contest the hoard's order in the courts. 
In the meantime, no new business and few renewals are coming 
in. Merchants in many localities are canceling their policies 
rather than continue at the rate as made under the general 



July 23, I'JIO. 



and California Advertiser 



33 



schedule in force up to July 11th. Their idea is that the legis- 
lature which me cial session on Juh 23d will n pea] I hi 

: law :nnt relieve the situat 

* * * 

Special Agent George I-'.. fowhsend was presented with a 
handsome diamond watch charm In hie associates when be lefl 
the office of the Connectieni Fire to accepl a similar position 
with the Aetna Fire. 

\. A. Doolittle has been install im 1 ;is manager of the fire <li- 
partment of Silent & Co.. of Los Angeles. 

The Paeilie Coasi Fire of Vancouver, IS. ('., will increase its 
capital stuck, recently raised I" half a million, In a million dol- 
lars. 

George ('. MeCounell, an old-time insurance man. and I'm 
a number of years cashier for Russell W. Oshorn in the Penn- 
sylvania's Coast office, died after a lingering illness on July 12th. 

Secretary George W. Brooks, of the California Insurance 
Company, returned from a month's vacation trip to the moun- 
tains on July 18th. 

The New York Underwriters and Hartford Steam Boiler will 
move from the Merchants' Exchange to the ground floor of the 
Security Building. 

C. C. Kinney, of the Franklin and Reliance, has returned from 
a month's visit to the Yosemite. 

Former Special Agent T. H. Williams, of the Tyson Agency, 
has been called in to fill the office of general adjuster. 

President J. H. Seattergood, of the Union of Philadelphia, 
represented on the Coast by Bertheau & Watson, is due to arrive 
in San Francisco on August 1st. 

The Detroit Fire and Marine has appointed James B. Brown. 
Jr., general agent for Colorado, and J. K. Mullen will represent 
the company at Denver. 

Assistant Manager A. G. Sanderson, of the Aetna's Pacific 
branch, is at his desk again after an extended trip through the 
Pacific Northwest and British Columbia. 

The rules of the Los Angeles Board have been changed so that 
agents may employ salaried solicitors at a minimum salary of 
$50 per month. The local board rules will apply only to the ter- 
ritory within the old city limits. 

W. C. Leavitt, manager of the Union Mutual Life, of Port- 
land, Mc., has returned from a visit, to his mining properties at 
"Randsburg. It is reported that he was offered $150,000 for his 
interests last week. 

B. C. Ansley. a retail druggist of Los Angeles, has been ap- 
pointed general agent for California of the American Druggists' 
Fire of Cincinnati, 0., which has tiled its papers for admission to 
Ibis Slate. 

George G. Brown, Eormerly with the United Surety Company, 
will have charge of the Casualty Department of the new Empire 
Life Insurance Company of Seattle, Wash. 

Landes & Brickell now represent the London Guaranty 
Accident in California. 

The British America and Western have removed from the 

American Exchange to 189 Leidesdorff street. 

Genera] \irenl Clarence M. Smith was in attendance at the 
annual agenO] meeting of the Northwestern Mutual Life, held at 

Milwaukee, M ich. 



With preliminarj plana well lined up For the big Electri- 
cal Exposition scheduled for August 20th to 27th, at the new 

Coliseum, San Francisco, public interest in the event is in 
bag decidedly. The show is to be held under the auspie.'s of the 
various electrical companies located in San Francisco and vicin- 
ity, and is to b Inflations] in nature with the pnrpi 

demonstrating to the public the various advantages offered by 
electrical devices. The wonderful strides made during the past 
iion in every line of mechanical development is in an 
inestimable measure due to electrical possibilities. All these 
wizard workings of this most mysterious of known forces will be 
demonstrated at the Coliseum to the very best advantae 



"Gee!" said the observing hoy. "when 1 grew up 1 

ing after a political job." "What for?" asked the man. 
the ball gal afternoon.' 

Press. 




Luxury 

Convenience 

Contentment 



Golden State Limited 



Ask about the low 
rate round trip 
tickets Easr, on sale 
certain days May 
to September, 1910 



Southern Pacific-Rock Island 

Ticket Offices: 

Flood Building, 882 Market Street, Market Street Ferry Depot 
Third and Townsend Sis.. Depot 

Broadway and Thirteenth Street, Oakland 



Wrdding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
: also at Fairmont Hotel. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of Fabian Toplitz, Deceased. 
Notice Is hereby given by the undersigned executors of the last will 
of FABIAN TOPLITZ, Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons hav- 
ing claims against the said de. xhlblt them with the necessary- 
vouchers within ten months after the first publication of this notice to 
the said executors, at the office 800 to 
S06 Claus Spreckels Building. San Fi Id om>e 
the undersigned selects as their place of business In all matters con- 
nected with said estate of Fabian Toplitz. Deceased. 

MONROE F. T< iPI.ITZ 
MEl.Vli.I.E S. TOT'I.ITZ 
MAI: MBB 

Executors of the last will of Fabian Toplitz. 
Dated. San Francisco, July 12. 1910. 



34 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 23, 1910. 




THE PRECINCT. 

I care not what the precinct be 
Of my life, so the sun [ see: 
So that a guerdon of gay flowers ; 
My window and my walk embowers; 
And little birds, with peep of day, 
And fall of eve, their fate ohey. 

I care not what the narrow round 
By which my penury be bound, 
So I be saved from voices vain, 
The crash of greed, the grab of gain; 
Prom vapors, and the laden ?tatc 
Of them that hunger to be great. 

I care not what the little view 
Be mine of paths to pleasure due, 
So breath be there, where peace abides, 
Where lingers day — night, nothing hides 
That is not weary with the best 
Of labor, kind, and come to rest. 

— Arthur Lewis in. Harper's Monthly. 



DAISY TIME. 
I plucked a daisy in the fields, 

And there beneath the sun 
I let its silver petals fall 

One after one. 

I said, "He loves me, loves me not," 

And oh, my heart beat fast. 
The flower was kind, it let me say, 

"He loves me," last. 

I kissed the little leafless stem, 

But oh, my poor heart knew 
The words the flower had said to me, 

They were not true. 

— Sara Teasdalc in Harper's Monthly. 



IN A GARDEN. 

I saw her in a garden dighl in May, 

With every manner flower in bright perfeel 

She picked the fairest without stint or stay, 

Though every mw mir l'< .n •< ■< I an ill reject inn. 

Fast fading in the sun's too ardenl glances, 
To Massing foot and fiery i n resigned, 

She hikes no pity of their cruel chances — 

Beauty to beauty ever was unkind. 
Though they would of themselves ao seen have wasted 

Cut them not short, Lady of my heart ! 
Spill not the cup that thy own lips have tasted. 

Thou too art mortal, then play not in deaths part. 
As these to thee, so thou to death must pay — 
And at that thought f turned me sad away. 

— Oeorge Herbert Girty in Harper's Monthly. 



DREAM. 
Our loves must leave us as our youth must go, 
December bury the dead ghosts of May; 
And yet in dreaming thus 1 heard to-day 
An old familiar footstep in the snow. 

— Elizabeth M. Dinwiddle in Century. 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco is located at 626 

Merchants' Exchange building, where all business of the Citi- 
zens' Alliance is transacted. The Free Labor Bureau, of the 
Alliance, in Oakland, is at 801 Broadway. All classes of male 
heip is furnished, absolutely free, to employer and employee. 



TFrHATT TAVERN 

X J— I V^X XX X \~J COR. POWELL and EDDY STS. S. F. 

Pbone Douglis 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladies' Grill 

Have Secured 

SIGNOR GINO SEVERI 

to conduct their orchestra commencing April 22nd. 1910 

Concerts daily during Luncheon, Shopping Hours, Dinner and 
After Theatre 

Special Lunch Served During Shopping Hours 

Under the management of A. C. MORRLSSON 



The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 



RESTAURANT 



WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 



Home C 6705 



Bay State Restaurant & Hotel 



269 OTARRELL STREET 



Serve Excellent 
Special Lunches 
Excellent French Dinner 



NEAR MASON 



50c 
75c 



Hungarian Orchestra, 12 to 2 p. m. — 6 to 8 p. m. 



FISH A SPECIALTY 

MUSIC EVERY EVENING 

French Dinner served with Red or White Wine $1.00 

JULES Under MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Phone Kearny 1812 Ladles Grill 




etincu/i 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 54-64 Ellis Street 

Our Cooking Will Meet Your Taste Our Prices Will Please You 



BUNGALOW TO LET IN ALAMEDA 



Furnished Mission Bungalow of 8 
rooms, sleeping-porch, garage, sun- 
parlor, and large garden; 25 minutes 
to the city. 1515 4th Street corner 
Haight Ave., Alameda, Phone 2828. 



.Iii.y 23, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



35 



ROOSEVELT OS THE PRIZE-FIGHT. 

odore Roosevelt, writing in the Oul io July L6th, 

the position that boxing contests as an exercise and enter 

tainment has done much good in advancing the health and moral 

standing of the ami), navy and police organizations, and believes 
mcouragement of boxing as a sport. However, speaking 
experience while Governor of New York, he says: 

■■| saw several of these public boxing contests, in which the 
intent of the law was carried out in good faith. 

"Nevertheless, abuses crept in, and, finally one or two fights 
occurred where the surrounding circumstances were so scandalon 
that when 1 was Governor I was obliged to advocate, and finally 
to secure, the repeal of the law under which the contests took 
place, feeling convinced, together with the great majority of the 
citizens of the State, that under it almost all that made prize- 
lighting objectionable and demoralizing had gradually been re- 
\ ived. 

"I am sure that what has happened in New York will hap- 
pen in the nation at large, and that prize-fighting will be, as it 
ought to be, stopped in every State of the Union. Since it was 
stopped in New York, the conditions surrounding the ring have 
grown worse, and not better. The money prizes fought for are 
enormous, and are a potent source of demoralization in them- 
selves, while they are often so arranged as either to be a pre- 
mium on crookedness or else to reward nearly as amply the man 
who fails as the man who succeeds. The betting and gambling 
upon the result are thoroughly unhealthy, and the moving-picture 
part of the proceedings lias introduced a new method of money- 
getting and of demoralization. In addition, the last contest 
provoked a very unfortunate display of race antagonism. 1 
sincerely trust that public sentiment will make itself felt so 
effectively, as to guarantee that this is the last prize-fight to 
take place in the United States: and it would be an admirable 
thing if some method could be devised to stop the exhibition of 
the moving picture- taken thereof." 



8U< i 'ESS OF I CALIFOBNl I GIRL. 

Mr>. Noah Brand! and Miss Enid Brandt havi returned 

Berlin, where the latter has given thr lonsecutive concerts, 

the orchestra] concert on April 28th, with the Berlin Phi 
mum.' being by the special requesi of a large number ol the nobil- 
ity. Miss Enid was enthusiastically received both bj press and 
public, the latter recalling her no less than eighl lames al the 
lose of the Tschaikowski concerto. The Beethoven Appassionata 

--mi .ii.i. played a! hei firsi concert, was pronounced extraordinary 
by a number of the finest artist? in Berlin, and those who are 
especially enthusiastic are Arthur Nikisch. Algernon Ashton 
i who dedicated his latest set of pieces to her), Madame Scria- 
bine, wife of the celebrated Russian composer, and many others. 
Mrs. Brandt has been heartily congratulated upon the splendid 
training she has given her daughter, and on one occasion, when 
she herself performed, was urgently requested to accept a posi- 
tion in one of the conservatories in Vienna. Her many old 
pupils, admirers and friends will be pleased to hear, however, 
that San Francisco will now be her permanent home, as it is 
her birth place. Miss Enid will remain also for a number of 
years before making a London debut, until her physique is fully 
developed. 

The critics unanimously pronounce her extraordinarily gifted. 
and say her training leaves nothing to be desired. Mrs. Brandt 
and Miss Enid have been guests of Mrs. D. S. Dorn at her de- 
lightful country home in Menlo. but are now in San Francisco 
at their newly furnished home at 1257 Jackson street, where 
they will be pleased to see their friends. 



A lecture will be given next Sunday evening at the Gar- 
rick Theatre by Rev. Dr. Madison C. Peters, on "What (he Jew- 
has Done for Modern Civilization." While Dr. Madison C. 
Peters is not so well known west of the Rocky Mountains, he 
has been well received in many pulpits throughout the United 
States. This is the reverend gentleman's first visit to the Pacific 
Coast. 



Physician desirous of traveling will take a patient or a 

charge For a trip abroad. Best of references available. Address 
S. V. News Letter, Box 601. 



Pictures of all kinds made and framed to order by Fowzer. the ar- 
tist photographer. 3126 Sixteenth street, near Valencia. Finest child- 
ren's and professional work in the city. Photographs any time, any 
size, any price, any place. 




Another new house in the Crocker Tract, Piedmont. The Crocker Tract is without question the 
most desirable place In California for a home of distinction. Hundreds of thousands of dollars are 
being expended there now In building and development. Some choice sites for villas are offered for 
sale by Wlckham Havens Incorporated, entire top floor, Oakland Bank of Savings Building. 



San Francisco News Letter 



• Iri.v ■.'::. 1910. 




Mrs. Church — You say she was a war correspondent 

Mrs. Gotham — Yes: she was secretary of a woman's club. — Yon-. 
Jeers' Statesman. 

Low — T wont to the phrenologist's last week. Sue — Oh, 

what did lie tell you? Low — Well, I can't understand, lie 
coughed a little and then gave me back my money. — Catholic 
News. 

Teacher (to stupid pupil) — For what is Pisa noted? 

stupid Pupil — For — for Brighl Little Scholar (prompt- 
ing in a whisper) — Leaning tower. Stupid Pupil (eagerly) — 
Linen towels. — Ex. 

"Aw — will you give this note to Miss May de Sylphington, 

tin' — aw — pretty little blonde creature with the violet eyes, don'1 
you know, who dances in the ballet?" "That'll !»■ all right, 
guv'ner. I ought t" know her; I'm ber -in." — The Tattler. 

Hank Stuhbs — Ambition ain't hardly wuth while. Bilge 

Miller — Why not? Hank StuMis — Waal, ef von are behind the 
procession you hafter keep hum pin' in in somebody, an' ef you grl 
ahead you're liable o> gel teller-scoped." — Boston Herald. 

Tourist — Where's the bulldog L sold you the other day? 

•M)h. the baste swallowed a tape measure, and he din!, -hit!" 
Tourist (waggishly) — He died by inches, eh? "No, son-! II e 
went round by the hack of tie' house and died by the yard." — 
London Opinion. 

"Yes, I remember him." said Alkali Ike. "lie died rery 

sudden." "Heart disease?" asked the Eastern tourist. "Waal, 
now. 1 don't know as you kin say if was the heart any moiv'n 
the club, spade or diamond. Anyway, he dealt himself four 
aces." — Ph iladelph in Press. 

Monsieur Calino recently sent a now servant girl on an 

errand. Green to city way. she lost her way. and did everything 
wrong. "You've no sense al all!" Monsieur Calino stormed. 
when she returned. "The next time when I want an idioi in do 
an errand for me, I'll — I'll go myself!" — E.r. 

"This cookbook will do very nicely." said Mrs. Cfuwedd 

io the hook department clerk: "and now I want a good, standard 
work on taxidermy." "We don't keep any in stock," said the 
clerk. "How annoying!" sighed the young housewife, "and I 
not knowing a blessed thing about stuffing a fowl !" — Ex. 

The Bishop of Rochester consulted Sir Frederick Trevera, 

a noted surgeon, in regard to his health. Sir Frederick said i 
"Your lordship must go to Algiers or some winter resorl on the 
Riviera." "Impossible," replied the Bishop. "I have too much 

work to get through." "Well." said the doctor, "you must make 
your choice. It is either Algiers or heaven." "Dear me!" ex- 
claimed the Bishop with a Bigh, "then f suppose it must lio Al- 
giers." — Exchange. 

In an English constituency a canvasser happened upon an 

artisan busy reading the posted addresses ami studying the pic- 
tured faces of tho two candidates. "Well, "hat do you think of 
them?" asked the canvasser. Tho voter shrugged his shoulders, 

and said nothing. "Which candidate would you like to \oie for?" 

persisted tho other. "Don't know nothing about none of 'em," 

replied the British elector, "but by what I can see of 'cm. 1 thank 
'eaven as only one of 'cm ran gel in." — Ex. 

George Washington was very small, very black and very 

niu to the life of the public School which he had just entered. 
Hi- family had emigrated to the city from some unknown wil- 
derness, and the officials of the school brought him into line with 
the prospects of the higher education. It was his first day. and 

the teacher was trying to make him at I le. "And so youi 

name is George Washington?" said the teacher. "Yessum. Jorge 
Washin'ton." "Ami I suppose you try to he as like him as a lit- 
tle hoy can. don't you?" "Lak who. ma'am." "Like George 
Washington." The youngster looked puzzled. "Ah kain't help 
bein' like Jorge Washin'ton," he replied, stoutly, "co's that's who 
Ah am." — The Tmcthfs Gvmpwnion 



— —"'You ought not to gulp your lunch like that." "I'iii I 
save five minutes each day." "Five minutes, eh? Wait until 
you get to waiting two hours each day in some dyspepsia spe :i i - 
isfs anteroom." — Louisville < 'ourier-Journal. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $10,989,855.84 

ind Sight Exchange <t.79t. 550.21 

Deposits 23,064 

[galas W. Hellman President w McGavIn Assistant Cashier 

1. \v. Hellman, Jr... Vice-President George Grant Assistant Cas r 

F. L. l.ipman Vice-President K. I.. Jacobs Issistani Cashier 

James K. Wilson... Vice-President V. ii. Rossettl. . .Assistant Cashier 

Prank B.King Cashier C. U Davis Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
IsalasW. Hellman Wm. F. Herrln Leon Sloss F. W. Van Slcklen C DeGulgne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan HartlandLaw F. L. Lipman J. Henrv Meyer 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Chas. J. Deerlng Wm. Hass JohnC. Klrkpatrlck James K. Wilson 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 
are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO 
B. E. WALKER, President 
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000 
Reserve Fund, 6,000,000 



TRAVELLERS 1 CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are le- 
sued in denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 
and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated un the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained it 
every office of the Bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

San Francisco Office — California and Sansome streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial. 

i Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital Jl, 200,000. 00 

Capital actually paid up In cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,555.093.05 

Deposits, June 30, 1910 40,384,727.21 

Total assets 43.108,907.82 

Remittances may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m.. except Saturdays io 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President. N. Ohlandt: First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President and Manager, George Tournv; Third Vice-Presi- 
dent, I. W. Van Bergen: Cashier. A. II. R. Schmidt: Assistant Cashier, 
William Herrmann: Secretary, A. H. Muller: Assistant Secretaries, G. 
J. O. Folte and Wm. I ». NewhOUSe; Goodfellow & Eells. General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer. George Tournv, 
.1. W. Van Bergen. Ign. Stelnhardt, I. N. Walter, F. Tlllmann, Jr.. E. T. 
Kruse and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH— 2672 Mission St.. between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer. Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 Clement street, between 5th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer. 
M:i n.iger. 

French American Bank of Savings 

SAYINGS 108 SUTTER ST. COMMERCIAL 

(Member of Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

Capital Authorized $1,000,000 

Capital Paid-in 750.000 

Reserve and Surplus 166, 87 1 

Total Resources 6,i81,6S6 

OFFICERS — A. Legailett, President: Leon Bocq'ieraz. Vice-President; 
J. M. Dupas, Vice-President; A. Bosnuet. Secretary; John Ginty, Cash- 
ier; M. Girard. Assistant Cashier; P. Bellemans, Assistant Cashier; P. A. 
Bergerot, Attorney. 

Safe Deposit boxes for rent. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. W. COR. OF SUTTER AND SANSOME SIS. 

I 'aid l'p Capital $4,000,000.00 

Reserve and Undivided Profits 1.700,000.00 

Deposits 23,600. .00 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10.300.000.00 

Sig Greenebi President. 

H. Flelshhacker. Vice-Pres. & Mgr. A. Hochsteln Asst. Cashier. 

Jos. Friedlander Vice-President C. R. Parker Asst. Cashier 

C. F. Hunt Vice-rresident H. Choynskl Asst. Cashier 

R. Altschul Cashier G. R. Burdick Asst. Cash let 

A. T.. Langerman. Secretary. 
Issues Travellers' Letters of. Credit, available In all parts of th,- world: 
buys and sells Foreign Exchange, and issues drafts and cable transfers. 
Accounts of Banks. Bankers. Corporations, Firms and Individuals 
Invited. SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Ever Seen 
California's 
Holland? 



TAKE 

Southern Pacific's 

NETHERLANDS 
ROUTE 

The Daylight service between 
San Francisco and Sacramento 
via the new steamer "NAVAJO" 

Leave San Francisco 8:00 A. M. 
Arrive Sacramento 6:00 P. M. 

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 

A DELIGHTFUL SCENIC 
WATER TRIP 

for tourists and auto parties. 

Meals— Beautiful Staterooms and Parlors 



ASK AGENTS 

Pacific Street Wharf, Market Street Ferry Depot, 

Flood Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



LOZIER 

Legitimately 

High-Priced 



The LOZIER MOTOR CAR has 

been for years past the highest priced 
of American cars. That it has been 
legitimately high priced is proven by its 
steady growth in popular favor among 
those whose experience with Motor 
Cars enables them to judge intelligently 
as to REAL AUTOMOBILE VALUE. 



PIONEER AUTOMOBILE CO. 



724 to 732 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco 




If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
In your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO 













Th» 



Egyptian 

Cigarette 

of Quality 

1—— =^= 

AJLOMAT1C DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

FVRITY 



At your Club or Dealer's or 
TUB SURBRUQ CO., Makers, New York 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



•J? *& *Jf 

'J^ <J^ L*f^ 

A Boarding School for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated 'n Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tamalpals Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal condition for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



When the Mother's Milk Fails, 
Feed the Baby on 

BORDEN'S 

EAGLE BRAND 

CONDENSED MILK 



Known for Three 
Generations as 
the Best Food for 
Infant Feeding. 



BORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK CO. 




"LEADERS OF QUALITY" 



EST. 1857 



NEW YORK 



THE KNOBS WILL STOP YOUR SKIDDING 




MORGAN & WRIGHT 
NOBBY TREAD TIRE 

Patent applied for. 

''Throw Your Chains Away." 
Weinstock, Nichols Co. 

569 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco 

Phones— Market 6000; J 2311 

"WE SELL CONTINENTAL DEMOUNTABLE RIMS." 



The Political Vampire 



Established July 20, 18S6 




.0i mm®^ p%T?& 

^"^***_ ^^SSS^SS^j^ ^Zr^^V I . STATE 



WM 



5^% 



*&Nn&$ 



4> 



■■IsM i 



nfe 



•3^ 



(ftalifix^ 



Price 10 Gents 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, JULY 30 1910 



J4 Per Yw 




ALCO 



"What Lasts Best is Best" 




Six-Cylinder, Sixty H. P. Touring Car— Seating Seven— Price $6,000 

Built by the American Locomotive Co. 

Middleton Motor Car Co. 



550 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 



San Francisco Cal. 



INVESTORS 

Now is the Time to Buy and 
MAKE MONEY 

R"E"> 7f T\ The Signed Statement of WILLIAM IRELAN, Jr., Ex-State Mineralogist 
Hi ±\ U Regarding PAJARO VALLEY OIL COMPANY'S PROPERTY: 

"I would advise the development of the property, as the deduction from my examination warrants 
the belief that wells put down to sufficient depth would be large producers, as the geological 
conditions tend to prove that oil in large quantities is contained in the underlying sands." 

The PAJARO VALLEY OIL COMPANY is now drilling and seeks the 
co-operation of the investing public. A limited number of shares can be 
had at 20 cents each, until Aug. 15, at which time the price will advance 



For further information apply 






Pajaro Valley Oil Co. 



400 First National Bank Bldg. 
San Francisco, Cal. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francisco 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pore Water for Oakland 
Alameda 

Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 

treated, but bacterlologicatly pur ified by electrical process. 6 jallona 

DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK, SI. 60 per month. Slncle G gallon 

bottle, 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4192. 
980 45th Street Oakland. Cal. 



Hotel Del Monte 

announces the 

ANNUAL MONTH OF SPORTS 

AUGUST 19TH TO SEPTEMBER 10TH, 1910. 

Del Monte Golf Tournament 

Aug. 19th to Sept 88th. 
PACIFIC COAST GOLF ASSOCIATION TOURNAMENT, August 
87th i" August :11st. 

MENS OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP OF PACIFIC COAST, August 28th. 

23rd Annual Lawn Tennis Tournament 

Pacific States Lawn Tennis Association 

September 2nd to September 10th, inclusive 

Special hotel rates to players. Special round-ttip railroad rati 
Sub rlbe for the DEL MONTE WEEKLY (a guide to things worth 
knowing, seeing and doing in California.) 

H. R. WARNER. Manager. 
Chester W. Kelley. City Representative, I'll Kearny 1018. 




Santa Cruz 



Camp Curry SEStS. 



Picturesquely Located 



Convenient of Access 



Excellent Table and Beds 
Rates: $8 to $10 per week; $30 to $35 per month of four weeks 



PEPSIN 

CUM 



• UPIRIOR TO ALL 



CLOVERDALE STABLES 

Finest rigs in Sonoma County. Headquarters for Geyser Stage 
Line Hunting and Fishing parties furnished with horses, buggies 

and EU ' deS - H. I. BARKER, Prop. 



ElUtllditd July 10. I«J» 




Devoted to the Leading Intereate of California and the Pacific Coaat. 





VOL. LXXX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 30, 1910 



Ni: 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-offlce as second-class mall matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

The only candidates for re-eleetion to Congress are those 

whose aspirations have been stamped with the magic legend, 
"OK.— T. R." 

A marked falling off in the Kansas baby crop is attributed 

to the automobile. Maybe so ; the hand that twists the steering 
wheel has no time to 'rock the cradle. 

"No State Platforms Made Here" is the sign hung out 

at Beverly, Mass. But there is some fine carpenter and joiner 
work being turned out at Oyster Bay. 

The "Republic of Panama has just elected a now assembly. 

Thanks to the benign influence of a ditch-digging neighbor, no- 
body was killed or injured in the process. 

Mexico, we learn, has relaxed her prison laws against for- 
eigners, which probably means that victims of the favored class 
will hereafter get bread with their daily water. 

A New Jersey court has gone into executive session to 

find out exactly what the word "want'' means in a will. Let the 
learned justices try to keep house on $25 a week. 

In a New Jersey town a war of automobile supply dealers 

has sent the price of gasoline down to one cent a gallon. This 
is enough to take most of the fun oul of joy-rid 

■ John 1). Rockefeller has had so left filled with por- 
celain. His prospective heirs entirely approve the old gentle- 
man's prejudice against storing gold LB such p 

In his excitement, ■■> Sacramento County bridegroom took 

out a hunting license instead of Hie other kind. This is humorous 

ni' mil according to Hie reader's views on matrimony. 

A "made good" artisi re i i Hie Easl to b 

California in quest of a girl-type with "a slashing face." He 
quests in vain there are no hatchet I this way. 

A St. Louis expert blames patent baby foods for much 

of the infant mortality in summi il is pretty hard to im- 

prove on the infant lunch counter which nature provides. 

After thirty years of bitter hatred. John D. Rockefeller 

lias forgiven his brother Frank. Let the choir in the Euclid 
.Avenue Baptist church sing. "Blest be the Tie that Bin 

San Diego reports the killing inside the city limit! 

wildcat and a wolf, an. I. tor a wonder, no jealous neighbor town 
puts the information in the mining and real estate column. 

Germany need not have taken alarm and deported a col- 
ony of Mormons. With the cost of living where it is. nobody, 
not even a German, wants more than one wife — at a time. 

Missouri's prize cow has given eight tons of milk in six 

months. It wouldn't take nracfa of a herd on that basis to make 
! gold mine resemble a quarter of a dollar plus carfare. 



The kind of noise New Orleans makes as a candidate for 

a summertime exposition is most readily detected with the nose. 

Let us not waste any sympathy on those Eastern heat 

sufferers who are in the well-to-do class. It would cost them less 
than $100 per capita to get to California. 

Pittsburg ladies have been debating the question whether 

or not they should tolerate smoking by their own sex. In any 
other town this would make a foolish item, but in Pittsburg ! ! ! 

Nobody will blame the Native. Sons for declining to let 

into their celebration any verses by that Joaquin Miller who 
called them hoodlums, Joaquin was properly bidden to Joaqout. 

Prohibition wins in the Texas primaries — and the little 

old flask goes to the limbo whither the Lone Star State had al- 
ready sent the little pistol that used to rest in the other hip 
pocket. 

Only six lawful drinkatoriums in all New York after 

1 o'clock in the morning. "Gay Manhattan" is being Gaynored 
into a pretty fair imitation of a desert with few oases and wide 
apart. 

Bryan, according to the Nebraska Democratic machine, 

must eat crow, support the Republican platform or keep silent. 
Well, a man can eat crow or even swallow Republican doctrine, 
and still live. 

Four positions Inst within b year on account of her beauty 

is the sad, sad story of a stenographer in Washington. I >. ( '. Cheer 
up, little one; it won't be long until you have a wbii 
a-workin' for you. 

Down Santa Cruz way the mother-in-law of come. 

liei soif one of those new-fangled automatic revolvers, and went 
in for tragedy. When -be visits daughfc 
will be out in the village cemetery. 

A pair of San Bernardino women sang "\ ><■ • \lv Qod 

in Thee" to a truculent rattlesnake, and BO •banned him that 
they got his skin. The sex his learned a lot of ibiiiL's since that 
irated adventure of Mme. Eve. 

- i thought anything went here." said the unfortunate 

who was being judicially brimmed for smoking a cigarette in a 
San Francisco police court. A good deal depends in such a place 
upon where "anything" is consigned. 

After two days off the map. a Xew York preacher turned 

up badly frazzled and minus his money with a sorrowful tale 
about how he was "drugged with a cigar." Obviously thi 
need of a little practical education in the divinity schools. 

Visiting the "Poet of the Sierra," a delegation from the 

Sequoia Club was told that only those might climb a certain 
path who had violated none of the Ten Commandments. After 
that, every Jack and Jill of them just had to climb the path. 

A canny Scot is training toads -to eat the grasshoppers 

that afflict parts of Colorado, and expects to sell the educated 

hians for If horns are no bar. b 

gilt-edged chance to capitalize one of Arizona's chief pro. 



E ID) E T © R D A L 



COMMENT 



Saloon Regulation 
in Market Street. 



San Francisco does not care for any 

more saloons on the south side of 

Jtarkot street, between Third and 

Fourth. It will not stand for the 

kind of saloon in that block that a James Schwartz might fairly 

be expected to operate. Indeed, the city ran get along very well 

without the Schwartz kind of Baloon in any neighborhood. 

This Schwartz has a reputation in the liquor trade and at police 
headquarters that ought to make it difficult Eor liim to get a 
lieense to do anything except go away and stay there. As the 
keeper of a grossly offensive dive before the lire, he earned dis- 
tinction of Buch a brand that he is now confronted and opposed 
before the Police Commissioners, not only by the merchants of 
the vicinity in which he wants to open a "place," and by the 
saloon keepers of that environment) but by the organization of all 
the. saloon men of the town. It will be bad business tor the pres- 
ent municipal administration if the Commission disregards that 
strong protest. 

The purpose of licensing the liquor business, aside from thai 
of revenue, is to keep out of it people like Schwartz, and to penal- 
ize any imitation of the Schwartz methods: Thai, too, is the 
main purpose of the saloon men's organization. As the liquor in- 
terests of the country have found out, the best way to avoid pro- 
hibition is for the saloon keepers to <■. .-operate with the authori- 
ties in regulating the trade and keeping it clean — keeping out the 
Schwartzes. That is exactly what the saloon men are doing in 
this ease, and they are to be commended for it. Their protest de- 
serves, and will doubtless receive, at the bands of the Commission, 
earnest consideration. They need not go further in producing 
evidence; the record of Schwartz to which they point without 
comment is quite enough. 

San Francisco has a particular pride in Market street, the 
finest thoroughfare in all the world, and will not submit to any 
defilement of it with a Schwartz deadfall or any saloon that is 
not eminently respectable. If the city must tolerate groggi ries 
of the baser sort, they will have to find lodgment on bark Btreets. 
The attempt of Schwartz to open up a ••resort" in one of the bus- 
iest and most conspicuous blocks of the busiest and finest street 
is a remarkable combination of insolence and stugidity. The de- 
nial of the lieense should be prompt, and couched in Buch terms 
as to leaye no doubt in the public mind about the intention of 
the administration to protect both .Market street and the general 
welfare of the community. 



(loon Men W wtiii 
in Justices' Coi rts. 



While the voter in San Frarn tsco 
listens to the tumuli and the shout- 
ing of the candidates Eor the Gov- 
ernorship nomination and for places 

on the tickets thai may lead to other high offices, lei him not for- 
get that one of the worst evils of municipal Government in these 
days has its roots awaj down toward the bottom of the ballot. 
The high and the middle justid are observed by all men and are 
applied — in the civil sense, at least — to the comparatively few. 

It is the Poli.c Court on the ■ hand and the Justice Courl 

on the other that have mosl to do with the community's daily 
life. So let the city voters pay attention to the minor places on 
the primary ballots, particularly to the candidates for nomina- 
tion to the Justice Courts. 

Five Justices of the Peace are to he elected this year in San 
Francisco. For these offices more than twenty men are seeking 
Republican nominations. Some of them are good men: others 
are neuter or unknown; others are possibly bad in a positive way. 
Those among this little army of aspirants who have heretofore 



served the public may be judged by their records. Those who arc- 
unknown as far as such service is concerned are to be considered 
in the light of their public statements of their private careers and 
their declarations and professions, coupled with the endorsements 
they are able to procure from the organizations and the men that 
know them. When the votes are in and counted, it will be found 
that the electors have chosen the men who made open and above- 
board campaigns, and having given little heed to the silent seek- 
ers, the '"gum shoe'' campaigners. 

Fortunately for the great body of small litigants whose causes 
are passed upon in the Justice Courts, there is no lack of men 

desirable for that bench among the score and v of those who 

have filed nominating petitions. The list of aspirants includes 
a gratifying number of men qualified in every way to sit in judg- 
ment in this lowesi court — qualified in legal understanding, in 
experience with men and affairs, and in soundness of character. 
Some of these the News Fetter has already mentioned, and of still 

others it may speak hereafter, with no design to press upon the 
electorate any individual but for the purpose of giving the v. iters 
a selection from the aspiring army out of which they in turn may 
safely make their choice. 

IB- 
It is a reproach upon the judiciary 
Ending THE Farce. of the city and county of San Fran- 

cisco that Messrs. Patrick Calhoun, 
Tirey L. Ford and \\. M. Abbott, after years of effort, to secure 
justice in the court before which they were arraigned at the be- 
hest of a maliciously inspired and privately paid prosecution, 
should have been compelled to seek that justice in the Supreme 
Court of the State The Constitution guarantees every accu ' 

citizen the right to speedy trial. The gentlemen named, charged 
by business rivals and personal enemies with an infringement of 
the law, have sought that trial repeatedly and persistently, but 
it has always been denied two of them, despite the impossibility 
of a conviction, as was shown by the prompt acquittal, twice, of 
the third. Tf personal malice and judicial bias were ever pres- 
ent. I hey were certainly shown here. 

It is pleasing to believe that this prolonged travesty on the law 
is about to end, but not the least pleasing feature of the situation 
is the incidental rebuking of the Lawlors and Dunnes of the 
bench — past, present and future. 

W 
Whi n Porter Charlton, murderer, in 

Tilt: CHARLTON CASE. the yard of Jersey City jail, refused 

to mingle with the other prisoners. 

but stalked apart, loftily making the remark that he "came of 
good slock, ami was not of them," be knew, as it turns out, 
whereof he was speaking. The riff-raff in Jersey City jail — the 

i I of them wrong-doers only in smaller ways, probably, and 

then mostly through want ami the unfair conditions of life im- 
posed upon them — are still "serving time" that the Stale may 
exact its full penalty, and he satisfied; but Porter Charlton, who 
"came of good slock and was not of them;" Porter Charlton, the 
Self-po ed. cold-blooded murderer of the beautiful w an 

whom he married for love, is about to he set free, or sent to an 
asylum by way of temporary excuse for lifted justice. In this 
Dinted States of America such is the distinction of the forum be- 
tween the canaille and the aristocrat. Aristocrat, indeed ! Who is 
Porter Charlton, anyway? There are Indians on the plains of 
Arizona with a longer and prouder lineage; hut. for the matter of 
that, what is iineage either!' For reasons of comparison, bow- 
ever, lei us call 1'oiier Charlton an aristocrat — an American aris- 
locrat who can afford to hire alieiiisu ami as commonly recog- 
nized by our American judiciary. Repeatedly during the last 



Jul? 30, 1010. 



and California Advertiser 



few years have our highest courts gone on record as being pos- 
sessed of a desire to do everything in their power to free the 
murderer of birth ami influence. Nine limes .ml of leu they 
have freed him, too, ami all along the poor man. committing or- 
dinary theft through want, lias taken his three, live. 0T ten years' 

sentence— and wondered. Where is our boasted equality ami de- 
mocracy in a game like this? Am! ii does mil stop there. There 
are men in this country thai our courts wouldn't ami couldn't 
hang, no mailer what they did. Porter Charlton's hands are 
much loo white ami perfectly manicured, forsooth, to be suffered 
lo grip themselves in imposed death. Porter Charlton's nervous 
system is much too highly strung, sensitive ami delicately nur- 
tured to he made to hear the agonies of capital punishment. Por- 
ler Charlton's cultured brain would revolt at such an end. But 
these same white hands heat the life out of a woman whom it 
was their duty to caress; the same nervous system was perfectly 
eool ami self-possessed in carrying out one of the most bloody ami 
shocking crimes in history; ami the same brain to-day, self-cen- 
tered, ami without an insane thought pertaining to it as it hqpes 
and speculates on freedom, does not revolt al the terrible deed it 
committed. But, of course, lie will get off. He cannot be ad- 
judged in this country, and there is too much "influence" in his 
favor at Washington to permit of his extradition by the Italian 
Government. According to a recent despatch — "the State De- 
partment will refuse extradition unless Italy agrees to return to 
.the Fnilod Stales all Italians wanted for crimes in this country." 
At this dale, Italy, of course, would find such a contract impos- 
sible, even if she tried lo carry it out. The State Department is 
well aware of the fact, and so are (he "influences" whose call it 
is obeying. I'orter Charlton, murderer, will probably he sent to 
an insane asylum for a couple of months and come out a free 
man. He may even marry again and get rid of another wife. 
Who knows — witli our State Department willing? 

W 

Not since the Congressional cam- 
Getting Ready tok 1912. paign of 1S-W has public sentiment 

shown a disposition to anticipate the 
issues of the next Presidential contest, ami force them lo the 
front and oblige bolh parlies to begin to show their hand. In 
the great struggle in that year between Lincoln and Douglas 

ior the Illinois United States Sen rship, the Republicans then 

going through the process of organizing themselves into a 
national party, it became necessary for both parlies to outline 
what their issuer would he in I860. It was public sentiment 
thai forced diseas^nm two pears in advance of the possible, if not 
probable, issue of the Presidential campaign two years hence. 
During his debate with Mr. Douglas, Mr. Lincoln made 
clear that the Republican partj would oppose the doctrine of 
stales' rights to the extent of independent sovereigntj separate 
from the compact of the union of tin 9 and also Hie party 

would reject and oppose the tlieorj that the right to introduce 
slavery in the territories simply on the mound that the territories 
Here national domain and free lo be occupied by sla\e~ until they 

became states. Thus two years before the Presidential election 

id' I860, public sentiment had forced the parties to declare whai 
their national polil \ would he alter the next Presidential election. 

As we have said, this is 9 that public sen- 

timent has expressed itseti on future national issue*, and that 

they he clearly defined and discussed before the people. 

Hut however marked and determined public sentiment 
ISoS, that national is-u.~ should he outlined and declared two 
years in advance, it is equally so now. only that ultra v 
rights and slavery are DOW imp Public sentiment 

in 1910 is dictating what the police of the Government shall 
he under the next administration. In fact, the people are making 
lay that the winning party in 1918 will be the 



Advertise Products 
of California. 



party that honestly stands for. without equivocation, downward 

tariff revision, a merchant marine, a better and more elastic cir- 
culating money medium, conservation of public lands, closet 

supervision of public carriers, ami no more billion dollar Con- 
gresses. These are the leading policies and reforms thai public 
sentiment is already demanding shall obtain under the next 
national administration. The parly that fails to give these as- 
surances in a way that commends it to (he confidence of the pub- 
lic will have very little evidence when the vote is counted thai 
it was in the running. The people cannot be fooled or hood- 
winked all the time. They are awakening to a sense of the rights 
and duties of citizenship. 

W 
Coincident with a most commendable 
movement Inward consolidation and 
concentration of San Francisco's 
commercial bodies comes a new cam- 
paign to rebuild and renew the city's manufacturing enterprises. 
It looks like the real thing at last. Perhaps its best promise of 
actual results is delivered by the appointment of a genuine ad- 
vertising man as the head of the special committee on publicity 
and promotion — not a man with advertising to sell, hut a large 
and successful purchaser of the kind of publicity that pays and 
is paid for. B. E. Queen is the man. He has become rich by 
liberal and skillful advertising of a California-made article that 
is exactly what his advertising cracks it up to he. 

The new campaign for the restoration of San Francisco lo 
her old place as a manufacturing center, and then for (he moving 
up of that rank, is conducted under the direction of a new or- 
ganization, the Home Industry League of California. This as- 
sociation, which includes a number of the most active and influ- 
ential men in the community, is doing ami planning to do in a 
large ami general way what has heretofore been undertaken by 
special associations, "revolutionize manufacturing conditions in 
the State. " And Mr. Queen holds by the printed word, the 
newspaper printed word, as the best means of advertising. Lis- 
ten to him: 

"All members of the community are suffering from the un- 
reasonable partiality shown goods of Eastern manufacture. Thou- 
sands are unemployed in this State because the sales of Califor- 
nia-made articles have fallen off. 

"Ft is not that there are better manufactories elsewhere. It 
is because the manufacturers of this state do not Id the people 

know what they have, There are man\' articles of general con- 
sumption manufactured here ol which the public arc in 
ance. Those manufacturers who have established a mar! 

complain of losing it are largely responsible for the falling 
off. 

"I hold that when a manufacturer produces an article equal 
l.i the standard he must let the public know lie is doing so. lie 
mii-l blaze the wav to facilitate it- sale. lie must keep the 

subject before the people constantly. This can only he done juc- 
dly through the newspapers." 

Mr. Queen i> no theorizer. lie has no advertising to sell. He 
is not a seller, hut a buyer of the commodity he so urgentl 

ommends. What advertising has done for him be very naturally 
thinks — nav. knows — it will do for other manufacturers. For 
he can point to a fortune and to a commercial standing that 
make him and bis product rate all over the country with thi 
lie is not shooting in the air. hut he tells the California manu- 
facturers that they are overlooking their best opportunity when 
they neglect their hon . not merely losing the nearest 

and cheapest opportunity to sell goods, but actually sondin. 
where the money they pay out ii I for their own living. 

If Mr. Queen will pardon the liliertv taken with a nan 
titled to the utn er will suggest to the 

California manufacturers that be loot - urnal like 

card to draw to. 



8 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 30, 1910. 



Not all who are afflicted with the 
The Political Vampire, anti-corporation craze, especially the 
anti-railway malady, mean to be 
vultures and feed on the carrion of unwholesome prejudice. They 
simply do not understand, but they are gradually coming to un- 
derstand that a public service corporation cannot be weakened or 
any part of its efficiency crippled without doing violence to every 
interest in the community which it serves, and they are coming 
to understand that public service utilities are permanent fixtures 
and cannot be moved or abandoned to escape hostile attacks. For 
the good of the public and for their own protection, they are 
justified by the written and unwritten law of self-defense to em- 
ploy all necessary means of resistance to protect their own from 
the hand of the spoiler. This resistance is as much due the 
public whom they serve as if is themselves. The law of inter- 
dependence binds the public service utilities to the public by 
ties of mutual interest, and he who would disrupt or weaken these 
ties is an enemy of all concerned, and his suppression is de- 
manded by justice. It is the business of the public carrier to 
supplv its community with ample service at reasonable tolls for 
the service, but it is equally the business and the duty of the com- 
munity to safeguard the utilities of the carrier that his ability 
to serve may not be impaired by violence or conspiracies. This 
view of the natural relation between the public service company 
and the community it serves is coming to be better understood 
and recognized. 

Also reasonable people are coming to understand that the army 
of employees of the public service are consumers and not pro- 
ducer?, and that their ability to be consumers is exactly in ratio 
to the stability of the service and its ability to give liberal re- 
muneration and permanent occupation to its employees. It is 
clear, therefore, that whatever weakens or cripples the carrier's 
facilities reflects disastrously upon the income of the employee 
and reflects disastrously iipon those who provide for his consump- 
tion requirements in that his income is crippled, and conse- 
quently his demand for supplies is correspondingly curtailed. 
Now. this same presentation of economic facts applies with equal 
force and truth to the owners — stock-owners — of that which rep- 
resents the money invested in the public service utilities and con- 
struction of its permanent way and its necessary facilities for 
supplying the public's requirements for transportation facilities. 

But what is it, and who is it, that is conspicuously at the 
front breathing out threatenings against the public service com- 
panies? Everybody knows that it is the political vampire, and 
everybody knows that he does not want "reform" in the Telation 
between the common carrier and the public. He wants to gorge 
himself on the blood of the public service company, and he feasts 
on blood, not to impair the value of the carrier's property, but 
he pays for the feast by seeing to it that it is not impaired. Now, 
if is to minimize the greed for blood as much as possible that the 
public service corporations are "in politics." They know that 
the cry and ravings of the vampire is all "sound and fury, sig- 
nifying nothing." except that it is a warning to the corporation 
that the time has come for it to open its veins and spread the 
table. Is not the public service corporation "in polities" in self- 
defence and to protect the right and opportunity of his army of 
employees to earn a living? No sane man believes that the com- 
mon carrier dabbles in politics for the pleasure of opening his 
veins to feed hungry vampires. But besides that, the common 
carrier knows, too. that it is threats of legislative impairment 
of his property that he is called upon to confront and appease. 
Tn short, the political vampire is the most degraded and heart- 
less of hold-up men. and the amazing thing is, that although the 
public is not ignorant of him or his methods, it. the public, 
listens to his story year after year, and complacently marches to 
'be polls and again commissions him to return to his field of 
blood-sucking. California very much needs a higher standard of 



official integrity, and while working on that, it would be well to 
erect a higher ethical standard for the voting privilege. There 
is no moral difference between holding up and robbing a public 
service train and holding up its owners and blackmailing them. 
If there is any difference, it is political, not ethical. 



Home Industry 
and the Unions 



With from eighteen to twenty thou- 
sand dollars drawn out of San Fran- 
i LSCO every week, and being sent to 
Los Angeles, where it goes to mak- 
ing good business for the Los Angeles merchant, it is very diffi- 
cult t'> make the San Franciscan of average intelligence believe 
that the labor unions are enthusiastically in favor of home in- 
dustry. 

Right in lin" with the above is Hie ail of tin' Labor Council in 
issuing a letter placing the ban of the boycott on each and every 
box-making shop in Sin Francisco. All of the San Francisco 
box factories are "open shop." so the unions are advising the 
consumer not to patronize home industry, but to -end to far-off 
Washington for '''knock down" boxes, and thus thousands more 
of dollars find their way out of San Francisco to other localities. 
1 1 i- only a question of time when the labor union's way of testi- 
fying its love of home industry will reduce San Francisco to the 
standing of an agricultural village, with one blacksmith shop and 
a saloon. The open shop is the only thing that is now keeping 
things alive. 

The Labor Day parade, we arc told, is to be a "home industry" 
parade. Carrying a banner behind a blaring band, the pool' fools 
will walk their legs off in an enthusiasm for home industry, while 
their leaders take their money and send it to other communities 
and advise business men to trade elsewhere. The labor leader is 
always busy shearing some one, and it makes little difference to 
him if it is one of his own followers, providing the shearing yields 
long wool at a good price. 



A friend of mine who was once county clerk of f»es 

Moines, la., told me of an experience he bad while holding the 
office with a woman who made numerous calls upon him in com- 
pany with a man who was always in a slate of intoxication. The 

purpose of their visit was to secure a i riage license. As a 

mallei' oi course; the clerk each time refused the request. The 
last time the woman appeared, as usual leading in her drunken 
friend, the clerk, in a most impatient mood, exclaimed : "My dear 
woman, why do you always bring this man here to get a license 
when he is drunk?" "Because," said she naively, "I can ni" i 
him to come along when he is sober." — Lippincolt's Magazine. 



Banquets and dinners are noi ,■ plete unless the Italian 

Swiss Colony's AST] SPECIAL, DRY, is served. II is a- g 

as the best French champagne at half the price. 



BOTTLED 

IN 
BOND 




BLACK 
LABEL 



July 30, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




ON THE RIGHT TRACK. 

(Artist Harrison Fisher has come West to seek a girl with a 
"slashing head" for his model. — Daily Paper.) 

Will lier hair be the hue of the sunset, 

With a tinge of the red in its gold ? 
Or perhaps they'll be tresses of raven 

And as dark as night's curtains unrolled? 
Will his dream be a matron or maiden? 

Will he find her at one of the teas ? 
Will she turn out a belle in a ball room, 

Or stenographer punching the keys? 
Will he meet her somewhere by the seashore, 

As she plays like a sprite in the surf ? 
Will he find her in cowboy apparel 

As she spurs her swift horse o'er the turf? 
Will he find her outdoors in her motor, 

As she speeds the machine "''on the high ?" 
' Will he find her in aeroplane costume 

As she flutters clear-eyed in the sky? 
Will he find her absorbed at the counter 

As she pensively clamors, "Oh, cash?" 
Will he find her white-robed in a restaurant 

Where she gracefully deals him bis hash? 
Will the beauty be heiress or pauper? 

Will she turn out a co-ed. or dub? 
Will he find her campaigning for suffrage 

And demanding her rights ;ii the club? 
Well, no matter, 'tis certain he'll find her, 

He has started out right in the quest. 
For the girl that the artist is seeking 

Must be surely somewhere in the West. 
5 5 S 
Atmosphere has a decided commercial a> well as an artistic 
value. A no less practical person than an Italian restaurant 
keeper has just admitted that, 'ibis restaurateur had at one 

time among his. guests some of the lesser and greater literary 

lights, such as Jael London, Qillett Burgess, Herman Whittakcr 
and the Dante-escjue (in appearance erling. They, in 

company with other literati and dilettante ill all the arts dined 
at. a center table. Worshipers of the high brows came there 
to watch the "animals" dine, and the restaurateur waxed opulent. 

As be waxed opulent, he began to become indifferent to his 
in guests, whose appetites wen good, but whose meant 
limited. The] consumed so much bread and wine, and other ac- 
cessories thai their trade was hardly profitable. The restaurateur 
began to affront them openly, and gave them to understand thai 
literary trade was not wanted. viler some strong hints, the 
high brows withdrew from the restaurant. 

Almost immediately, other trade began to fall olT. and the res- 
taurateur began to be worried. Finally be asked an opulent cus- 
why be did not come as often as before. He was informed 
that il was because the literary curios had gone. Then it dawned 
upon the restaurateur that it was not the fame of his cuisine 
that drew custom, but the fame of his literan iom he 

had foolishly driven away. 

He hunted some of 'hem up and humbled himself in the dust. 



He adored art, and he was infatuated with literature. He would 
do anything if they would return to that, center table ami lie on 
exhibition at the dinner hour. A compromise was arrived a! 
whereby the restaurateur agreed to make a special rate for liter- 
an persons, a ridiculously low one. The literati arc now back 
at the same old table, and the curious pack the place to see the 
celebrities dine. The restaurateur is all smiles and optimism. 
Certainly atmosphere has a commercial value if you know how 
to handle it. 

5 5 5 
At last the Police Commission has decided that we are to 
have no more additional saloons. This is most excellent judg- 
ment, and they might do still better by exterminating some of 
those we have. The present average is one saloon to every two 
hundred and six people. As a considerable percentage of this 
number do not partake, or only to a slight degree, the rest of 
them are obliged to fairly drink their heads off to keep up the 
saloon. For a saloon, once started, will exist whether its patrons 
do or not. This sort of civic patriotism, whatever else can be 
said for it, is neither good for the complexion nor the bloom of 
posterity. Besides, the trade keeps making a greater demand on 
it all the time by extending itself and serving worse rain-water. 
The lunch counters become slimmer, the bartenders more cor- 
pulent and savage, and the "bums" more frequent. The lower 
the saloon is, the more it will drag out of a low crowd, ft 
is to such a crowd that the majority of these places are obliged 
to appeal. They comprise the fighting force of the two hundred 
and six with the rest of ns stepping in only occasionally to gulp a 
social Scotch. But even at that, the effort is too great — and the 
problem grows. We must either become greater "bums" or 
quit, when by saloon gravitation the "bums" will become greater 
"bums." In any case the saloons are bound to be supported. 
Except through accident, they never die. It is a funny predica- 
ment. Perhaps we should drink our heads off to save our brothers 
to semi-respectability and perhaps we should not. The Looker On 
for one refuses to eat that many cloves. If, on the other hand, 
our Police Commission would take away the licenses of one quar- 
ter of our present number of saloons, and give the fruit - 
a chance, we might try and make it our plea-ant duty to support 
the rest of them without too great a risk to nose and complexion. 
» 5 5 
With such suburbs, and this is no pointed reference to Hills- 
borough, what is the use of San Francisco being virtuous? There 
is nothing to it — our environment is bad. Whenever we deny 
ourselves anything and to throw out our chest and have 

a downy-white opinion of our virtues, we glance upon one or 
other of our extremities to behold a bi ir, or one of some 

other color just as BUgf Perhaps on the whole it would 




Freely Flowing, Simply Snowing, 
Without a Fault, LESLIE SALT. 

IN HERMETICALLY SEALED PACKAGES 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 30, 1910. 



be best not to adopt whiteness at all, but be just our natural 
color, which, considering our present administration, is Irish, 
of course — a very good color when it isn't on the nose. What- 
ever we turn out to be, however, we have at least a reasonable ex- 
cuse to go to the devil. No one is supposed to be better than 
the company he keeps — and South San Francisco has clasped 
to its rakish heart the Jeffries-Johnson fight pictures. Mayor 
Daniel Mac-Sweeney (another in the lion s den) has actually bid 
for them, in fact — having no fear apparently of what may hap- 
pen to him when he dies. Poor MacSweeney! And he even 
dares to jest about it and hand us a knock-out drop. 'Happy 
MacSweeney ! 

Said a friend to him: "You seem to think the Jeffries-Johnson 
pictures 'a good thing?' " 

.Said MacSweeney: "That is the only reason I can imagine 
they were kicked out of San Francisco." 
5 s s- 

Police Judge Edward Shortall, he of the remarkable accusing 
forefinger, is to be married. Any tree man can gel married al 
any time, of course, but in this case ii is slightly different. The 
Judge never looked as though he were considering it. His eyes 
even in brooding, introspective moments, the ecstatic, recurring 
moments of modern courtship, have never shone with the hard 
financial light that tells of present-day Love and its tender con- 
siderations. Ah, but, say his friends — the Judge is really in love. 
In a world of heiresses thai he might have had — should he have 

pointed forth his inimitable finger and -aid "Come!" — « - 

pliment him. The lady, it is whispered, is not one of them. In 
an era so "modern" as this, il is wed to know that a real love 
affair can yet lake place — even if the girl in the ease denies il 
blushingly. But how did Cupid ever get past the dictating, im- 
pregnable Shortall forefinger? How did he escape being prodded 
in his little "tummy" ami laid cold by that satirical, analyzing, 
pointing digit, the wonderful "right"' of the forum? In what 
remarkable manner did he work in his blow to the heart and lay 
the Judge at his feet, or rather at the lady's? However, or 
whatever, it is not out of place to express the wish that this fight, 
like the Jeffries-Johnson affair, will at no time in the future cli- 
max at Reno. Cupid never wins thee. The hast sori of fop- 
brained lawyer plucks his feathers for his nesi. But hen — well, 
he has conquered Judge Shortall. Xone are so mueh surprised 
as the Judge's own friends. One of them .-aid to him: 

••Why. 1 cannot imagine you being in love, Shortall." 

"I don't see why." retorted the Judge; "I have been 'courting' 

all my life." 

o- & ?r 
George Cameron, a well-known sport- 

ing man of New York, and one of the 

unfortunates who left his purse in Reno 

on that memorable day. July 4th last, 

wishing it were his wife, probably, is en- 
gaged at present entertaining the inmates 

of a private asylum for the insane. This 

isn't a result of (icorge's desire to work. 
but his aunt, who manages the institution, 
and with whom G